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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1986

DUDLEY LEIGH

The object of the Investment Profiles is to expose the bidden assumptions which lie behind valuations of investment properties, and in doing so to provide a more objective…

Abstract

The object of the Investment Profiles is to expose the bidden assumptions which lie behind valuations of investment properties, and in doing so to provide a more objective platform for debate and argument about any particular valuation. The traditional approach to valuation is to apply an ‘all risks’ yield to the flow of income from any property, reflecting the advantages and disadvantages of that investment. However, there is no sound objective basis on which to justify the ‘all risks’ yield used. In reality, the valuer arrives at the yield by making a number of subconscious mental adjustments to the yield based on the particular features or disadvantages of the property under consideration. Investment Profiles arrive at the same ‘all risks’ yield by an explicit approach, the valuer making a series of adjustments to the yield. These adjustments can then be debated and argued. The need to resort to unscientific cliches like ‘prime’, ‘semi‐prime’ and ‘secondary’ can be much reduced or avoided. The paper considers a number of example valuations, and demonstrates that the technique is easy to understand and simple to use.

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Journal of Valuation, vol. 4 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-7480

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1982

John Dawson and Leigh Sparks

The idea that “anything goes” in enterprise zones certainly is not the case, particularly as regards retailing. Floorspace size limits on new retail developments…

Abstract

The idea that “anything goes” in enterprise zones certainly is not the case, particularly as regards retailing. Floorspace size limits on new retail developments, stringent in some cases, are commonplace. John Dawson and Leigh Sparks look at the various schemes and compare the restrictions, which have been set to exclude superstores, hypermarkets, discount stores and the like.

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Retail and Distribution Management, vol. 10 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-2363

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1995

Leigh Danks

Electroplated coatings of zinc have been successful in protecting steel components against corrosion for many years. However, with the introduction of more exacting…

Abstract

Electroplated coatings of zinc have been successful in protecting steel components against corrosion for many years. However, with the introduction of more exacting standards, the performance of the traditional zinc finish has not been considered up to the mark. Alternative protective systems have been offered as replacements but none has been entirely able to compete cost‐effectively with the electroplating process.

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Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology, vol. 67 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0002-2667

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1986

In the matter of food purity and control Hospital Catering Services have been outside the law, a privileged position where the general law of food and drugs have never…

Abstract

In the matter of food purity and control Hospital Catering Services have been outside the law, a privileged position where the general law of food and drugs have never applied and the modern regulatory control in food hygiene has similarly not applied. In the eyes of the general public hospital catering standards have always been high above the general run of food preparation. As the NHS continued, complaints began gradually to seep out of the closed community, of dirt in the kitchens and prevalent hygiene malpractices. The general standard for most hospitals remained high but there were no means of dealing with the small minority of complaints which disgusted patients and non‐cater‐ing staff, such as insect and rodent infestations, and an increase in the frequency of food poisoning outbreaks.

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British Food Journal, vol. 88 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1954

Aarhus Kommunes Biblioteker (Teknisk Bibliotek), Ingerslevs Plads 7, Aarhus, Denmark. Representative: V. NEDERGAARD PEDERSEN (Librarian).

Abstract

Aarhus Kommunes Biblioteker (Teknisk Bibliotek), Ingerslevs Plads 7, Aarhus, Denmark. Representative: V. NEDERGAARD PEDERSEN (Librarian).

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Aslib Proceedings, vol. 6 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0001-253X

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Book part
Publication date: 14 August 2014

Julita Haber, Jeffrey M. Pollack and Ronald H. Humphrey

This chapter introduces the concept of “competency labor” and illustrates its important role in organizational life for both researchers and practitioners. In the…

Abstract

This chapter introduces the concept of “competency labor” and illustrates its important role in organizational life for both researchers and practitioners. In the contemporary workplace environment individuals face increasing expectations of competence. However, demonstrating competence is no simple task – rather, to demonstrate competence requires a concerted effort in terms of individuals’ affect, cognition, and behavior. Accordingly, new models are needed that can explain these emergent processes. The present work integrates the literatures related to emotional labor and impression management, and builds a theory-based framework for investigating the processes (affective, cognitive, and behavioral) of making desired impressions of competency at work and how these processes impact critical individual and organizational outcomes. Our conceptual model proposes how growing demands in the workplace for individuals to display competence affect how they think, feel, as well as act. In sum, our work advocates that a new research stream is needed to better understand the “competency labor” phenomenon and its theoretical as well as practical implications.

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Emotions and the Organizational Fabric
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78350-939-3

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1947

THIS journal is not devoted exclusively to public libraries; they are only part of the library fabric but, because the preponderant number of workers in our craft are in…

Abstract

THIS journal is not devoted exclusively to public libraries; they are only part of the library fabric but, because the preponderant number of workers in our craft are in public libraries, they and their work naturally occur more often in our pages than do those of others. We have always urged that the profession is indivisable and that a librarian is a person who, in his fundamental training, should be equipped to serve in any kind of library. The tendency to create distinctions, based upon slight—and they usually are slight—differences of work, are unfortunate and have led to bickerings and sometimes recriminations. Even between the two arms of the public library service, the county and the urban, there has been an emphasis on the differences rather than the likenesses; and every wise librarian knows that the services of a fully‐engaged library in a town are exactly the same as those of a county except that the county has to cover longer distances. The emphasis is even stronger where public and nonpublic libraries are in question.

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New Library World, vol. 49 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1992

Andrew Myers, Mairi Bryce and Andrew Kakabadse

That competitiveness in the single European market is recognized bysome companies as a challenge providing opportunities, that it is seenby others to be a threat, has been…

Abstract

That competitiveness in the single European market is recognized by some companies as a challenge providing opportunities, that it is seen by others to be a threat, has been the message communicated in numerous publications. Contributes further knowledge by identifying the various active pursuits of companies in making their visions of successfully competing in Europe a reality, and by highlighting the requirements for a company to become successful post‐1992. Successful management is required to establish a long‐term strategic intent for Europe in order to be competitive and for a company to be a “winner” post‐1992. The “winners” so far are the companies which have pan‐European organizational infrastructure, and can manage manufacturing, brands and distribution, on a European‐wide basis.

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Journal of European Industrial Training, vol. 16 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0590

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 1983

This Food Standards Committee Report has been with us long enough to have received careful appraisal at the hand of the most interested parties — food law enforcement…

Abstract

This Food Standards Committee Report has been with us long enough to have received careful appraisal at the hand of the most interested parties — food law enforcement agencies and the meat trade. The purposes of the review was to consider the need for specific controls over the composition and descriptive labelling of minced meat products, but the main factor was the fat content, particularly the maximum suggested by the Associaton of Public Analysts, viz., a one‐quarter (25%) of the total product. For some years now, the courts have been asked to accept 25% fat as the maximum, based on a series of national surveys; above that level, the product was to be considered as not of the substance or quality demanded by the purchaser; a contention which has been upheld on appeal to the Divisional Court.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 85 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1987

LPP solve problem of acidic effluent storage. Laminated Plastic Products were approached by a company who manufacture castings and pressings in aluminium and other non…

Abstract

LPP solve problem of acidic effluent storage. Laminated Plastic Products were approached by a company who manufacture castings and pressings in aluminium and other non ferrous metals. One of their processes involves the use of various very corrosive acids. Specifically these include nitric, hydrofluoric, sulphuric and chromic acids at concentrations of up to 30%. After use these acids are run to an effluent pit where they are held prior to their removal by tanker for disposal.

Details

Anti-Corrosion Methods and Materials, vol. 34 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0003-5599

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