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Book part
Publication date: 23 September 2014

Community perception of climate change is a factor in increasing local awareness of climate disaster risk. This encourages more disaster risk reduction actions by the…

Abstract

Community perception of climate change is a factor in increasing local awareness of climate disaster risk. This encourages more disaster risk reduction actions by the communities themselves, and thus, provides a driver for sustainable community disaster risk management (DRM) initiatives. Using these hypotheses, this chapter assesses whether the communities’ climate change perceptions, awareness of climate hazardous risk, and subsequent actions on DRR enable local DRM capacity to reduce the increasing climate disaster risk. The study conducts household surveys with an original questionnaire in four communities in Cartago City, Costa Rica.

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Local Disaster Risk Management in a Changing Climate: Perspective from Central America
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78350-935-5

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Book part
Publication date: 13 August 2014

Rajib Shaw and Shohei Matsuura

Schools play an important role in Japan by becoming evacuation centers after disasters. Depending on the nature of disaster, the school can be occupied for several days to…

Abstract

Schools play an important role in Japan by becoming evacuation centers after disasters. Depending on the nature of disaster, the school can be occupied for several days to several months. Therefore, schools play a crucial role in disaster risk reduction and can contribute to very strong bonding with the local communities. This chapter describes the experiences of six cities with the roles of schools during disasters. Kamaishi, Kesennuma, and Natori, three cities affected by the tsunami, have shown the important role that schools played in the time of disaster. Although some schools were destroyed in these three cities, people spent significant time in other schools as evacuees. Pre-disaster preparedness of schools and communities helped a lot in this regard. Taking the experiences from the East Japan disaster, Saijo, Owase, and Oobu cities in West Japan demonstrated their preparedness for future disaster. The chapter also shows that school-centered disaster preparedness before the disaster leads to an effective role during the disaster and also facilitates post-disaster recovery with schools as the center.

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Risks and Conflicts: Local Responses to Natural Disasters
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78190-821-1

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Book part
Publication date: 30 March 2011

Takako Izumi and Rajib Shaw

During the period of 2000–2009, a record 402 climate-related disasters occurred in the Southeast Asia region, and the number of geophysical disasters was 61 according to…

Abstract

During the period of 2000–2009, a record 402 climate-related disasters occurred in the Southeast Asia region, and the number of geophysical disasters was 61 according to the International Disaster Database by Center for Research on the Epidemiology (CRED). The number of climate-related disasters is much higher than that of geophysical disasters, but due to small or medium scale of the events, attention and assistance to most of them have been limited. Although many people are affected by these disasters every year, in many cases, they do not have sufficient idea and knowledge on preparedness and disaster risk reduction (DRR).

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Climate and Disaster Resilience in Cities
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-85724-319-5

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Book part
Publication date: 16 September 2014

Abstract

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Hyogo Framework for Action and Urban Disaster Resilience
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78350-927-0

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Book part
Publication date: 16 September 2014

Abstract

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Hyogo Framework for Action and Urban Disaster Resilience
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78350-927-0

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Article
Publication date: 11 June 2021

Yi Lu, Lai Wei, Binxin Cao and Jianqiang Li

Disaster risk reduction (DRR) researchers and practitioners have found that schools can play a critical role in DRR education, with many Non-Governmental Organizations…

Abstract

Purpose

Disaster risk reduction (DRR) researchers and practitioners have found that schools can play a critical role in DRR education, with many Non-Governmental Organizations (NGOs) developing initiatives to actively involve children in DRR education programs. This paper reports on a case study on an innovative Chinese NGO school-based program focused on participatory child-centered DRR (PCC-DRR) education, from which a PCC-DRR education framework was developed so that similar programs could be replicated, especially in developing countries.

Design/methodology/approach

After nearly a year of research involving follow-up interviews, fieldwork and secondary data collection from annual reports, news reports and official websites, a case study was conducted on the PCC-DRR education program developed by the One Foundation (OF), a resource-rich NGO in China, that focused on its education strategies and project practice in Ya'an following the 2013 Lushan earthquake.

Findings

Based on constructivist theory, the OF developed a PCC-DRR education program that had four specific branches: teacher capacity building, child DRR education, campus risk management and campus safety culture, which was then implemented in 115 schools and consequently evaluated as being highly effective.

Originality/value

The innovative OF PCC-DRR education program adds to theoretical and practical DRR education research as a “best practice” case. Because the proposed framework is child-centered, participatory and collaborative, it provides excellent guidance and reference for countries seeking to develop school-based DRR education programs.

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Disaster Prevention and Management: An International Journal, vol. 30 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0965-3562

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Book part
Publication date: 16 September 2014

Abstract

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Hyogo Framework for Action and Urban Disaster Resilience
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78350-927-0

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 2010

Roshani Palliyaguru, Dilanthi Amaratunga and Richard Haigh

The literature emphasises that integration of disaster risk reduction (DRR) into planning processes is a key to reduce natural disaster losses, boost socio‐economic…

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Abstract

Purpose

The literature emphasises that integration of disaster risk reduction (DRR) into planning processes is a key to reduce natural disaster losses, boost socio‐economic development needs and ensure sustainability in development gains. But linking DRR to the infrastructure reconstruction sector has become a challenge in developing country settings. Therefore, the purpose of the main research, of which this paper is based on, is to explore how integration of DRR into infrastructure reconstruction should be done in such a way to contribute to socio‐economic development process. As a part of this main aim, this paper focuses on exploring the existing gap in the concept of DRR at the policy‐making level and the infrastructure reconstruction project level. Thus, the paper seeks to review the current policies on post‐disaster reconstruction and DRR at the national and intermediate‐organisational level in Sri Lanka and integration of DRR concept within these policies. Not limiting to the policies, DRR processes were assessed on their success through the level of implementation of DRR strategies at the post‐disaster infrastructure reconstruction projects.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper is based on the data collated from a case study conducted in a water supply and sanitation reconstruction project in Sri Lanka supported by expert interviews among national and intermediate‐organisational level policy makers those who are involved in the development of policies related to disaster management and construction activities.

Findings

The results highlight the lack of individual policies on reconstruction and DRR of reconstruction at the national and intermediate‐organisational level except certain sections within certain policies. It was found that integration of DRR within these policies is lower than the level of importance of such integration. Further, the level of implementation of these policies in practise is average as it is averted by required speed and quality of reconstruction, availability of finances for reconstruction, the scale of reconstruction projects, reliability and practicability of policies, legitimacy of policies and adequacy of authority delegated to the relevant bodies, the consistency of various policies, detail explanations on relationships with other policies, the level of awareness about policies by the relevant bodies, attitude of construction professionals and experience of reconstruction bodies in the field of disaster reconstruction.

Research limitations/implications

The findings of this paper is not limited to one specific policy related to disaster management or construction in Sri Lanka. It represents an overall view of most of the existing policies in the field. Furthermore, the data collection was limited to the Sri Lanka context.

Practical implications

The findings of this paper will be useful to relevant policy makers to understand the areas needed further attention within the policies in terms of integration of DRR concept within them.

Originality/value

The paper is unique in its findings as it discovers overall gaps in the concept of DRR within the policies and actual infrastructure reconstruction project practises.

Details

International Journal of Disaster Resilience in the Built Environment, vol. 1 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-5908

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Article
Publication date: 3 April 2019

R.E.A. Ashu and Dewald Van Niekerk

The purpose of this paper is to analyze the status quo of disaster risk reduction (DRR) policy and legislation in Cameroon.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to analyze the status quo of disaster risk reduction (DRR) policy and legislation in Cameroon.

Design/methodology/approach

Using a qualitative method, this paper examines historical data from sectoral administrative reports, plans, declarations, commitments and speeches, texts and peer-reviewed journals on disaster and risk management in Cameroon for the period 1967-2017. Empirical data from ten selected government sectors were used to analyze the status quo, together with quantitative data collected by using four instruments (i.e. HFA Priority 1 & 4, USAID Toolkit, GOAL Resilience Score and the Checklist on Law and DRR).

Findings

Findings show that Cameroon largely still practices disaster response through the Department of Civil Protection. Transparency and accountability are the sine qua non of the state, but the lack thereof causes improper implementation of DRR within development institutions. DRR is seen as an ad hoc activity, with the result that there is not effective institutional capacity for implementation. The need to develop a new national DRR framework is evident.

Originality/value

Analyzing the status quo of DRR in Cameroon could assist with the review and reevaluation of a new DRR framework within the Cameroonian territory.

Details

foresight, vol. 21 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-6689

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 2014

Ksenia Chmutina and Lee Bosher

Employing a case study of Barbados, the purpose of this paper is to highlight key stakeholders involved in the construction sector, discusses the roles of construction…

Abstract

Purpose

Employing a case study of Barbados, the purpose of this paper is to highlight key stakeholders involved in the construction sector, discusses the roles of construction stakeholders in disaster risk reduction (DRR) and the key stages of the construction process where proactive DRR inputs could be made, The following objectives are addressed: to describe the main natural hazards in Barbados; to reveal key stakeholders involved in the decision making during the design, construction and operation process (DCOP) and DRR process; to discuss the roles of construction stakeholders in DRR and the key stages of the DCOP where proactive DRR inputs could be made; to emphasise the main barriers to the implementation of DRR in the Barbados’ construction sector.

Design/methodology/approach

A qualitative case study methodology, that includes semi-structured interviews with construction stakeholders in Barbados, a critical review of relevant literature and media coverage of natural hazards, and construction site visits.

Findings

The key construction stakeholders that should be responsible for DRR integration in construction process are identified. The main barriers to the implementation of DRR in the Barbados’ construction sector are also discussed; these include the absence of an enforced building code and complacency towards natural hazards from the general population as well as construction stakeholders.

Originality/value

Whilst some attempts have been made in mainstreaming DRR into construction projects in Barbados, many of the measures are not effectively implemented due to various constraints. In addition, little research has been done on the state of the construction sector and its use of DRR in the Caribbean. This paper aims to fill this research gap.

Details

Disaster Prevention and Management, vol. 23 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0965-3562

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