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Article
Publication date: 8 July 2022

Jiahe Chen, Ping-Yu Hsu, Yu-Wei Chang, Wen-Lung Shiau and Yi-Chen Lan

Considering both online and offline service scenarios, this study aims to explore the factors affecting doctors' intention to offer consulting services in eHealth and…

Abstract

Purpose

Considering both online and offline service scenarios, this study aims to explore the factors affecting doctors' intention to offer consulting services in eHealth and compare the factors between the free- and paid-service doctors. The theory of reasoned action and social exchange theory are integrated to develop the research model that conceptualizes the role of extrinsic motivations, intrinsic motivations, costs, and attitudes in doctors' behavioral intentions.

Design/methodology/approach

Partial least square structural equation modeling (PLS-SEM) was leveraged to analyze 326 valid sample data. To provide robust results, three non-parametric multigroup analysis (MGA) methods, including the PLS-MGA, confidence set, and permutation test approaches, were applied to detect the potential heterogeneity between the free- and paid-service doctors.

Findings

The results with overall samples reveal that anticipated rewards, anticipated associations, anticipated contribution, and perceived fee are all positively related to attitude, which in turn positively influences behavioral intention, and that perceived fee positively moderates the relationship between attitude and behavioral intention. Attitude's full mediation is also confirmed. However, results vary between the two groups of doctors. The three MGA approaches return relatively convergent results, indicating that the effects of anticipated associations and perceived fee on attitude are significantly larger for the paid-service doctors, while that of anticipated rewards is found to be significantly larger for the free-service doctors.

Originality/value

eHealth, as a potential contactless alternative to face-to-face diagnoses, has recently attracted widespread attention, especially during the continued spread of COVID-19. Most existing studies have neglected the underlying heterogeneity between free- and paid-service doctors regarding their motivations to engage in online healthcare activities. This study advances the understanding of doctors' participation in eHealth by emphasizing their motivations derived from both online and offline service scenarios and comparing the differences between free- and paid-service doctors. Besides, horizontally comparing the results by applying diverse MGA approaches enriches empirical evidence for the selection of MGA approaches in PLS-SEM.

Article
Publication date: 5 July 2022

Jiaxin Xue, Zhaohua Deng, Tailai Wu and Zhuo Chen

This article aims to explore the factors influencing patients' distrust toward doctors in online health community.

Abstract

Purpose

This article aims to explore the factors influencing patients' distrust toward doctors in online health community.

Design/methodology/approach

This study leveraged the distrust construct model and socio-technical systems theory to establish a research model. The authors used the survey method to validate the research model by developing and distributing questionnaires to online health community users. 518 valid responses were collected.

Findings

The data analysis results showed that patients' distrusting beliefs were significantly related to their distrust toward doctors in online health communities. Meanwhile, social factors included perceived egoism and lack of expertise; whereas technical factors included no structural assurance, and lack of third-party recognition.

Originality/value

This study not only provides a solid and comprehensive theoretical understanding of patient distrust toward doctors in online health communities but also could serve as the basis to relieve the distrust between patients and doctors in online health communities, or even in the offline environment.

Details

Information Technology & People, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-3845

Keywords

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 12 July 2022

Eimear Nolan and Xiaoning Liang

The last decade has seen a significant increase in self-initiated expatriation research across various cohorts; however, limited research exists on the self-initiated…

Abstract

Purpose

The last decade has seen a significant increase in self-initiated expatriation research across various cohorts; however, limited research exists on the self-initiated expatriation of medical doctors despite their high mobility rates. The purpose of this paper is to investigate the determinants of cross-cultural adjustment among self-initiated medical doctors working and living in a host culture.

Design/methodology/approach

A questionnaire was distributed to self-initiated expatriate (SIE) doctors working in Irish hospitals. In total, 193 valid responses were collected. Three linear regression analyses were conducted to explore factors influencing cross-cultural adjustment among SIE medical doctors, along with qualitative insight into their adjustment to working and living in Ireland.

Findings

This study found that age, marital status, cultural novelty, previous international work experience, length of time working in the host culture did not influence the cross-cultural adjustment of SIE doctors. However, gender, language ability and perceived fair treatment were found to influence their cross-cultural adjustment in the study. Specifically, female SIE doctors reported higher levels of general adjustment to that of SIE male doctors. SIE doctors' language ability was found to influence their work adjustment, and those who perceived unfair treatment in the host culture reported lower levels of general adjustment.

Originality/value

This paper contributes to the limited knowledge and understanding surrounding the self-initiated expatriation of medical doctors and their cross-cultural adjustment to the host hospital and host culture.

Details

Journal of Global Mobility: The Home of Expatriate Management Research, vol. 10 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2049-8799

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 4 August 2022

Korina Katsaliaki

The purpose of this study is to investigate and compare the views of doctors, nursing staff and hospitalized patients on the level of information they provide and receive…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to investigate and compare the views of doctors, nursing staff and hospitalized patients on the level of information they provide and receive respectively in public hospitals, focusing on the factors that affect their communication.

Design/methodology/approach

The study used a cross-sectional survey with a sample of 426 participants from two general hospitals in Greece–Pella and KAT Attica. Data were collected through a questionnaire in March–May 2020 and was analyzed with mean comparisons and correlations.

Findings

The results showed discrepancy in the satisfaction rate, with 67.3% satisfied patients from doctors' communication vs. 83.7% satisfied doctors. Improvements in hospital staff – patient communication are required especially on alternative therapies' discussion and time spent on communication. All respondents agreed that staff shortage is a deterrent factor for effective communication. Seamless for all respondents' groups, the factors that affect the communication satisfaction level are the duration of communication, time allowed for expressing questions and interest in patients' personal situation.

Practical implications

Strengthening the communication skills of medical staff and providing clear guidelines on when and how to inform patients are essential.

Originality/value

This study contributes to the growing body of research on doctor–patient communication. Its originality lies on the fact that communication satisfaction level was examined simultaneously for doctors, nurses and patients. The study provides additional evidence supporting the link among satisfaction and duration of communication and personalized relationship. The study's findings are important in the training of medical staff and the management of patients' expectations.

Details

International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance, vol. 35 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0952-6862

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 27 January 2012

Jayne Greening

This article aims to review some of the literature relating to the concept of effective engagement of doctors with health service redesign and delivery and discuss the…

878

Abstract

Purpose

This article aims to review some of the literature relating to the concept of effective engagement of doctors with health service redesign and delivery and discuss the relevance in light of recent developments from the Academy of Medical Royal Colleges.

Design/methodology/approach

This article is a literature overview and personal reflection. It contains elements of personal reflection on the recent historical policy changes that have the potential to lead to frontline changes in the development of managerial training for doctors and how this could benefit healthcare systems

Findings

For services to be effective doctors need to be engaged in their design. Historically the engagement of doctors in this process has been haphazard and often taken on by doctors who have been provided with little management training. This has led to internal and external conflict and possibly been a contributing factor to lack of clinical engagement. The recent suggestions by the Academy of Medical Royal Colleges and NHS Institute for Innovation and Improvement around mandatory management training for doctors throughout all stages of their training as doctors has the potential to improve effective clinical engagement of doctors in service redesign and delivery and therefore their potential for success.

Originality/value

This paper has been written by a consultant psychiatrist who is involved with frontline delivery of services, medical management and training of doctors and medical students.

Details

Leadership in Health Services, vol. 25 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1751-1879

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 October 1996

John Øvretveit

Notes that medical participation in organization‐wide quality programmes and leadership of quality is commonly viewed as the key to a successful programme. Reviews and…

521

Abstract

Notes that medical participation in organization‐wide quality programmes and leadership of quality is commonly viewed as the key to a successful programme. Reviews and reports research into doctors’ involvement in such programmes as distinct from doctors’ involvement in medical quality activities. Reveals the lack of systematic evidence on the subject, suggests areas for future research, and summarizes what is known. Gives recommendations based on reported research and experience for quality training for doctors and how medical managers might engage their colleagues and other professions in quality programmes.

Details

Journal of Management in Medicine, vol. 10 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-9235

Keywords

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 6 October 2015

Erwin Loh

The purpose of this paper is to review the current literature and summarises the benefits and limitations of having doctors in health management roles in today’s complex…

8307

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to review the current literature and summarises the benefits and limitations of having doctors in health management roles in today’s complex health environment.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper reviews the current literature on this topic.

Findings

Hospitals have evolved from being professional bureaucracies to being managed professional business with clinical directorates in place that are medically led.

Research limitations/implications

Limitations include the difficulty doctors have balancing clinical duties and management, restricted profession-specific view and the lack of management competencies and/or training.

Practical implications

The benefits of having doctors in health management include bottom-up leadership, specialised knowledge of the profession, expert knowledge of clinical care, greater political influence, effective change champions to have on-side, frontline leadership and management, improved communication between doctors and senior management, advocacy for patient safety and quality, greater credibility with public and peers and the perception that doctors have more power and influence compared to other health professionals can be leveraged.

Originality/value

Overall, there are more benefits than there are limitations to having doctors in health management but there is a need for more management training for doctors.

Details

Journal of Work-Applied Management, vol. 7 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2205-2062

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 October 1994

Allan Bruce and Sandra Hill

Based upon empirical research conducted in 1993, attempts to illustratethe implications of efforts to bring doctors into management. Itaddresses in particular the role of…

514

Abstract

Based upon empirical research conducted in 1993, attempts to illustrate the implications of efforts to bring doctors into management. It addresses in particular the role of key appointments such as the medical director and clinical directors and the perceptions of these roles. Doctors continue to demonstrate themselves to be reluctant managers and this continues to pose problems for the aspirations contained in Working for Patients. Crucial questions must be asked about whether management represents a productive use of doctors′ time and whether the NHS can afford premium rates for largely inexperienced managers. Identifies changes that have taken place to date and indicates that doctors are, for the most part, still lukewarm about a career in medical management.

Details

Journal of Management in Medicine, vol. 8 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-9235

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 March 2005

Thomas Plochg and Niek S. Klazinga

To explore theoretically the reasons for the modest uptake of clinical governance practices by taking the literature on the origin of tensions between doctors and managers…

2099

Abstract

Purpose

To explore theoretically the reasons for the modest uptake of clinical governance practices by taking the literature on the origin of tensions between doctors and managers as the starting‐point.

Design/methodology/approach

The approaches of doctors and managers to the division and coordination of medical work are analysed theoretically from a twofold perspective that combines insights from sociologists' theories on “professionalism” and administrative scientists' theories on “management science”.

Findings

The combined perspective theoretically explains the problems between doctors and managers that frustrate the uptake of clinical governance practices. By inference from this theoretical analysis, a twofold agenda for a constructive dialogue is proposed. Doctors and managers must develop a shared vision of the division and coordination of medical work as well as discussing the values, norms and goals underlying patient care. It is questionable, however, whether this agenda is currently adequately addressed.

Originality/value

This paper provides a theoretical underpinning for the dialogue between doctors and managers. It may be enlightening for all doctors and managers working in the field.

Details

Clinical Governance: An International Journal, vol. 10 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7274

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 27 October 2005

Janice McCabe

Medicalization is the increasing social control of the everyday by medical experts. It is a key concept in the sociology of health and illness because it sees medicine as…

Abstract

Medicalization is the increasing social control of the everyday by medical experts. It is a key concept in the sociology of health and illness because it sees medicine as not merely a scientific endeavor, but a social one as well. Medicalization is a “process whereby more and more of everyday life has come under medical dominion, influence, and supervision” (Zola, 1983, p. 295); previously these areas of everyday life were viewed in religious or moral terms (Conrad & Schneider, 1980; Weeks, 2003). More specifically, medicalization is the process of “defining a problem in medical terms, using medical language to describe a problem, adopting a medical framework to understand a problem, or using a medical intervention to ‘treat’ it” (Conrad, 1992, p. 211). Sociologists have used this concept to describe the shift in the site of decision-making and knowledge about health from the lay public to the medical profession.

Details

Sociological Studies of Children and Youth
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-76231-256-6

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