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Article
Publication date: 1 July 2005

Nina Schuller

Disabled people are a neglected issue in criminology. This article discusses the extent of the population affected, social reactions to impairment and the disadvantages…

Abstract

Disabled people are a neglected issue in criminology. This article discusses the extent of the population affected, social reactions to impairment and the disadvantages faced by disabled people, including higher risk of victimisation. Links that have been made between disability and offending behaviour are also critically assessed. Finally, some practical solutions to include disabled people in community safety strategies are outlined.

Details

Safer Communities, vol. 4 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-8043

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Article
Publication date: 11 April 2011

Chih Hoong Sin, Annie Hedges, Chloe Cook, Nina Mguni and Natasha Comber

This paper aims to discuss the sensible management of risk for disabled people, which can turn into disproportionate steps to attempt to completely eliminate risk, leading…

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551

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to discuss the sensible management of risk for disabled people, which can turn into disproportionate steps to attempt to completely eliminate risk, leading to diminished opportunities across life. Instincts to protect are heightened in the context of disabled people as potential victims of targeted violence and hostility. Individual‐, organisational‐ and systemic‐level responses can often be orientated towards protection and/or the minimisation of risk rather than towards providing access to justice and effective redress.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper draws on evidence generated through a literature review, interviews with disabled people and interviews with representatives from a number of key organisations.

Findings

For many disabled people, incidents can be persistent and ongoing. Common responses by disabled victims include avoidance and/or acceptance strategies. They are also advised by those around them and by agency staff they come in contact with to ignore perpetrators or to avoid putting themselves at risk. Criminal justice agencies may be more concerned about a victim's disability than about taking action to provide access to justice and effective redress. The protectionistic approach underpinning much of policy, legislation and guidance can be at odds with the positive promotion of disability equality.

Originality/value

The paper examines the need to move away from a protectionist paradigm to a rights‐based paradigm. It calls for a more inclusive approach where disabled people are involved meaningfully in the process of risk management and in other decisions around combating targeted violence and hostility against them.

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The Journal of Adult Protection, vol. 13 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1466-8203

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 1992

Colin Barnes

Focuses on institutional discrimination in employment and explainswhy anti‐discrimination legislation is the most likely solution. Definesinstitutional discrimination…

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2027

Abstract

Focuses on institutional discrimination in employment and explains why anti‐discrimination legislation is the most likely solution. Defines institutional discrimination against disabled people, then provides substantive quantitative evidence of institutional discrimination in employment. Examines the main factors which cause that discrimination, and finally evaluates government policies relating to disabled people’s employment.

Details

Personnel Review, vol. 21 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

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Article
Publication date: 21 August 2007

Rita Newton, Marcus Ormerod and Pam Thomas

The aim of this paper is to report on a study undertaken into disabled people's experience of the built environment when attempting to access and stay in employment.

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5163

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this paper is to report on a study undertaken into disabled people's experience of the built environment when attempting to access and stay in employment.

Design/methodology/approach

Narratives were collected using semi‐structured interviews with 38 disabled people, all of whom had experience of paid and unpaid work.

Findings

Analysis of the interview narratives shows that disabled people experience a range of barriers and enablers in the built environment both to gaining employment and to staying in employment, and an accessible environment contributes to a successful employment experience.

Research limitations/implications

This is a small exploratory study of disabled people's experience of the workplace built environment. Future research could focus in more detail on whether specific design features reduce the requirement for reasonable adjustments.

Practical implications

The implications are that disabled people are experiencing discrimination when working environments present barriers and reasonable adjustments, as required by the UK Disability Discrimination Act 1995, and 2005, are not made.

Originality/value

This is exploratory research and provides an insight into the experience of disabled people of the physical workplace environment, presenting examples of good and poor practice.

Details

Equal Opportunities International, vol. 26 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0261-0159

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Book part
Publication date: 8 November 2017

Rebecca Yeo

The reduction in public services since 2008 has undoubtedly affected some groups, such as disabled people, more than others. Many of these cuts, ostensibly imposed in…

Abstract

The reduction in public services since 2008 has undoubtedly affected some groups, such as disabled people, more than others. Many of these cuts, ostensibly imposed in response to recession, bear similarities to measures previously tried and tested on disabled asylum seekers. I argue that the perception of national crisis was used by government as a smokescreen to expand the population affected by such policies, thereby asserting a predetermined neoliberal agenda of public expenditure cuts.

The inequality of this situation is compounded by the entitlements granted to people deemed exceptionally worthy. The Vulnerable Persons Relocation Scheme for Syrian nationals includes disability among the eligibility criteria, offering considerably greater entitlements than available to asylum seekers. If the response to certain people is markedly different to that offered to others, then negative consequences can be anticipated, as from any other example of inequality. Furthermore, this scheme promotes a significant shift in migrant entitlement. The UK government has no legal obligation towards this group; therefore, those people who are selected are recipients of gifts rather than people claiming their rights. I explore the nature and implications of such differences in entitlement, arguing that inequality in all its manifestations must be challenged to reduce deprivation and to avoid negative consequences for the wider population.

Details

Inequalities in the UK
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-479-8

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Article
Publication date: 19 September 2008

Torkild Thanem

The purpose of this paper is to introduce an embodied approach to disability into the field of diversity management research.

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3426

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to introduce an embodied approach to disability into the field of diversity management research.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper critically examines previous diversity management research and it draws on previous disability research in the social sciences to develop an embodied approach to disability for diversity management research.

Findings

The paper argues that an embodied approach is required because previous diversity management research on disability ignores important aspects of disability.

Research limitations/implications

The embodied approach to disability proposed in this paper expands the understanding of disability in diversity management research, and it discusses implications for future research and for organizations.

Originality/value

The paper is unique in proposing an embodied approach to disability in diversity management research.

Details

Equal Opportunities International, vol. 27 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0261-0159

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Article
Publication date: 24 September 2019

Geraldine Brady and Anita Franklin

In the UK, the Children and Families Act aims to create one assessment process for children with special educational needs or disability, through Education, Health and…

Abstract

Purpose

In the UK, the Children and Families Act aims to create one assessment process for children with special educational needs or disability, through Education, Health and Care Plans. It also aims for greater participation from children and young people in decisions about their own lives. Current evidence suggests that children’s needs and desires across education, health and social care are not being fully met, partly because adult agendas drive policy, practice and standards of care. Furthermore, little attention is paid to the way in which disabled children and young people are included either within decisions about their own support or within research processes. The purpose of this paper is to present a research process designed to address these issues.

Design/methodology/approach

Six disabled young people co-led this participatory research project; for the first time, disabled young people had the opportunity to define a research agenda which spoke to what “quality” might look like in planning for their own future and that of other disabled children and young people.

Findings

This paper presents findings from this process, addressing important ethical issues relevant for policy, practice and research, identified through this rights based, collaborative way of working in partnership. Three key issues were identified and are explored here. They include first, tensions between young people becoming leaders and dominant ideas about safeguarding and child protection; second, being empowered through engagement within the project yet restricted in other areas of personal life and, finally, the emotional impact on new researchers of gathering evidence of a continuing lack of autonomy for disabled children and young people. We argue that challenging dominant notions concerning the participation and protection of disabled children is required in order to ensure that they access their right to be decision-makers in their own lives, and to being empowered within research processes.

Originality/value

This is the first disabled young people-led study to investigate quality and rights for disabled children and young people using this rights-based methodology.

Details

Journal of Children's Services, vol. 14 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-6660

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 1987

Brian Doyle

Contemporary interest in vulnerable employment groups has focused on women, ethnic minorities and the secondary labour market. Social discrimination, marginal employment…

Abstract

Contemporary interest in vulnerable employment groups has focused on women, ethnic minorities and the secondary labour market. Social discrimination, marginal employment and low pay are the badges of vulnerability of these groups. As Section 2 shows, labour law's response to employment vulnerability has been piecemeal and tangential with the result that progress towards the enjoyment of basic employment rights by vulnerable workers has been slow and fortuitous. People with disabilities possess many of the traits of vulnerability shared by other disadvantaged groups but receive only a footnote in the pages of labour law. This article records the developing debate on the employment rights of disabled people and places it in the context of the current analysis of employment vulnerability.

Details

Employee Relations, vol. 9 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0142-5455

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 2006

Vesper Owei, Abiodun O. Bada and Manny Aniebonam

Developing countries are endeavoring to advance into the 21st century information age. Their progress, however, is hamstrung by the dire lack of trained, skilled and…

Abstract

Developing countries are endeavoring to advance into the 21st century information age. Their progress, however, is hamstrung by the dire lack of trained, skilled and knowledgeable IS workers who are able to interact with online and off‐line information sources. These countries can tap from the rich intellectual capital lying dormant within the ranks of disabled people to boost the pool of IS workers in their societies. However, before developing countries can draw on the information systems capabilities of disabled workers, these workers themselves must be able to function at par with their able‐bodied counterparts as information workers. This presupposes the availability of special‐purpose information systems devices and approaches developed for disabled users. In this paper, therefore, we examine several issues that are pertinent to IS and disabled people in developing countries, and propose an integrated infrastructure to enhance the interaction of disabled people with on‐line information sources. The study includes issues related to the suitability of different interaction methodologies and technologies for people with disabilities. Additionally, we propose the design of customized interfaces that can be used by disabled people to develop Web‐based database applications and to access and query on‐line databases.

Details

Journal of Information, Communication and Ethics in Society, vol. 4 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-996X

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Book part
Publication date: 15 October 2013

Susie Balderston

Disabled women are reported to be between twice and five times more likely to experience sexual violence than non-disabled women or disabled men; when these are hate…

Abstract

Background

Disabled women are reported to be between twice and five times more likely to experience sexual violence than non-disabled women or disabled men; when these are hate crimes they compound harms for both victims and communities.

Purpose

This user-led research explores how disabled and Deaf victims and Survivors most effectively resist the harm and injustice they experience after experiencing disablist hate crime involving rape.

Design/methodology/approach

Feminist standpoint methods are employed with reciprocity as central. This small-scale peer research was undertaken with University ethics and supervision over a five year period. Subjects (n=522) consisted of disabled and Deaf victims and Survivors in North of England.

Findings

The intersectional nature of violence against disabled women unsettles constructed macro binaries of public/private space violence and the location of disabled women as inherently vulnerable. Findings demonstrate how seizing collective identity can usefully resist re-victimization, tackle the harms after disablist hate crime involving rape and resist the homogenization of both women and disabled people.

Practical implications

The chapter outlines inequalities in disabled people’s human rights and recommends service and policy improvements, as well as informing methods for conducting ethical research.

Originality/value

This is perhaps the first user-led, social model based feminist standpoint research to explore the collective resistance to harm after experiencing disablist hate crime involving rape. It crossed impairment boundaries and included community living, segregated institutions and women who rely on perpetrators for personal assistance. It offers new evidence of how disabled and Deaf victims and Survivors can collectively unsettle the harms of disablist hate crime and rape and achieve justice and safety on a micro level.

Details

Gendered Perspectives on Conflict and Violence: Part A
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78350-110-6

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