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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1977

DEREK SINGER and GLORIA SMART

Waste of food has been a concern to MAFF for a considerable period. Recently, because of worries over national and world food supplies, and the necessity for the UK to maintain a…

Abstract

Waste of food has been a concern to MAFF for a considerable period. Recently, because of worries over national and world food supplies, and the necessity for the UK to maintain a healthy import/export balance by making best use of its available materials, there has arisen within academic, industrial, public as well as govrnment circles a wider interest in the manner in which we utilise the basic food materials which we grow and import, and to what extent we actually consume the foodstuffs available. In November 1976, MAFF announced the setting up of a Food Waste Survey Unit “responsible for collecting and collating data on waste as it arises from the point at which food commodities enter into food processing, distribution and consumption, and for reviewing ways in which waste may be reduced or may be re‐cycled within the food chain or otherwise usefully employed”.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science, vol. 77 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

Abstract

Details

Stories and Lessons from the World's Leading Opera, Orchestra Librarians, and Music Archivists, Volume 2: Europe and Asia
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80262-659-9

Article
Publication date: 14 November 2016

Andrew Kuo, Richard J. Lutz and Jacob L. Hiler

This paper aims to investigate the phenomenon of active escapism – a unique form of experiential consumption that engages fantasy and role-play as a means of coping. In contrast…

4624

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to investigate the phenomenon of active escapism – a unique form of experiential consumption that engages fantasy and role-play as a means of coping. In contrast with passive forms of escapism, whereby consumers act as observers (e.g. watching a movie), active escapism provides consumers with the opportunity to directly interact with mediated realities, whether constructed in a virtual space (e.g. a video game) or the real world.

Design/methodology/approach

Within the context of video game consumption, a conceptual framework for active escapism comprised antecedents, processes and consequences is established through literature review, depth interviews and naturalistic inquiry.

Findings

The findings suggest that active escapism functions as a coping mechanism when consumers are confronted with external stressors that threaten either their sense of identity or control. While other forms of emotion-focused coping relieve stress through psychological avoidance (i.e. refocusing of attention away from stressors), active escapism provides the benefits of affirmation and empowerment through projective fantasy (i.e. role-play) and presence (i.e. immersion into a mediated reality).

Originality/value

The conceptual framework established by this analysis gives insight into the structure of active escapism as a theoretical construct, providing a foundation for future research. Managerial implications for consumer escapism (e.g. branded in-game content) are discussed.

Details

Journal of Consumer Marketing, vol. 33 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0736-3761

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 July 1971

BOB USHERWOOD and RONALD HAGLER

PORN IS IN THE NEWS AGAIN. The Bishop of Coventry has suggested that good citizens form vigilante groups (literary lynch mobs?) to fight ‘the rising tide of filth’, while Lord…

Abstract

PORN IS IN THE NEWS AGAIN. The Bishop of Coventry has suggested that good citizens form vigilante groups (literary lynch mobs?) to fight ‘the rising tide of filth’, while Lord Longford has announced the names of the people to serve on his very own enquiry into the subject of pornography. One would suggest that the membership of the committee would invalidate any conclusion that it might reach. A sanctified pop singer, an ageing tv guru and assorted clergymen cannot be said to be a representative selection of the community. Not one member of the unofficial commission appears to have an open mind on the topic.

Details

New Library World, vol. 73 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

Article
Publication date: 1 June 1977

The connotations, associations, custom and usages of a name often give to it an importance that far outweighs its etymological significance. Even with personal surnames or the…

Abstract

The connotations, associations, custom and usages of a name often give to it an importance that far outweighs its etymological significance. Even with personal surnames or the name of a business. A man may use his own name but not if by so doing it inflicts injury on the interests and business of another person of the same name. After a long period of indecision, it is now generally accepted that in “passing off”, there is no difference between the use of a man's own name and any other descriptive word. The Courts will only intervene, however, when a personal name has become so much identified with a well‐known business as to be necessarily deceptive when used without qualification by anyone else in the same trade; i.e., only in rare cases. In the early years, the genesis of goods and trade protection, fraud was a necessary ingredient of “passing off”, an intent to deceive, but with the merging off Equity with the Common Law, the equitable rule that interference with “property” did not require fraudulent intent was practised in the Courts. First applying to trade marks, it was extended to trade names, business signs and symbols and business generally. Now it is unnecessary to prove any intent to deceive, merely that deception was probable, or that the plaintiff had suffered actual damage. The equitable principle was not established without a struggle, however, and the case of “Singer” Sewing Machines (1877) unified the two streams of law but not before it reached the House of Lords. On the way up, judical opinions differed; in the Court of Appeal, fraud was considered necessary—the defendant had removed any conception of fraud by expressingly declaring in advertisements that his “Singer” machines were manufactured by himself—so the Court found for him, but the House of Lords considered the name “Singer” was in itself a trade mark and there was no more need to prove fraud in the case of a trade name than a trade mark; Hence, the birth of the doctrine that fraud need not be proved, but their Lordships showed some hesitation in accepting property rights for trade names. If the name used is merely descriptive of goods, there can be no cause for action, but if it connotes goods manufactured by one firm or prepared from a formula or compsitional requirements prescribed by and invented by a firm or is the produce of a region, then others have no right to use it. It is a question of fact whether the name is the one or other. The burden of proof that a name or term in common use has become associated with an individual product is a heavy one; much heavier in proving an infringement of a trade mark.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 79 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Article
Publication date: 1 April 1980

Not many weeks back, according to newspaper reports, three members of the library staff of the School of Slavonic and East European Studies in London were dismissed. All had…

Abstract

Not many weeks back, according to newspaper reports, three members of the library staff of the School of Slavonic and East European Studies in London were dismissed. All had refused to carry out issue desk duty. All, according to the newspaper account, were members of ASTMS. None, according to the Library Association yearbook, was a member of the appropriate professional organisation for librarians in Great Britain.

Details

Library Review, vol. 29 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0024-2535

Article
Publication date: 1 June 1992

HOWARD JOHNSON

Alongside the ubiquitous computer games apparently the marketing success of the 1992 toy season was a series of 25 year old puppets who had featured in a repeat showing of the…

Abstract

Alongside the ubiquitous computer games apparently the marketing success of the 1992 toy season was a series of 25 year old puppets who had featured in a repeat showing of the orginal ITV series on BBC — Thunderbirds — more than 70 franchises have been sold to sell goods marked with the International Rescue logo and it is alleged that these products are even bigger than the previous smash marketing hit the Teenage Mutant Ninja turtles, saving thousands of jobs and making substantial profits for the British toy industry. The characters are licensed for right‐owners ITC (originally the international marketing arm of ATV, the ITV company which put out the programme, and now an independent company, ATV having long since lost its ITV franchise) by Copyright Promotions, Europe's largest licensing company (‘Thunderbirds are go to save the toy industry’ Sunday Telegraph 15/11/92).

Details

Managerial Law, vol. 34 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0558

Article
Publication date: 31 August 2010

Michael R. Hyman and Jeremy J. Sierra

Sport celebrities often endorse their team, their sport, and non‐sports‐related products. Increased idolizing of sport celebrities by adolescents is one artifact of this…

4303

Abstract

Purpose

Sport celebrities often endorse their team, their sport, and non‐sports‐related products. Increased idolizing of sport celebrities by adolescents is one artifact of this promotional practice. Although seemingly innocuous, adolescents who idolize sport celebrities may, as adults, come to worship such celebrities; this unhealthy obsession may afflict 10 percent or more of adults. If adolescent hero worship of sport celebrities is a gateway to this adult psychopathology, then alerting parents, as well as encouraging social responsibility among advertisers and sport teams/leagues, is critical. This paper aims to address the issues.

Design/methodology/approach

After a brief review of the literature on adolescent hero worship, the literature on the determinants and effects of celebrity worship are explored.

Findings

Once parents, advertisers, sport team/leagues are sensitized to the problem, adolescent hero worship of sport celebrities can be mitigated as a likely gateway to many adults' unhealthy obsession with celebrities.

Research limitations/implications

Directions for future sport celebrity worship research are suggested.

Practical implications

The incidence of a potentially psychologically damaging affliction can be reduced without harm to advertisers, sport teams/leagues, and athletes.

Social implications

Ways to reduce promotion‐induced sport celebrity worship – without eliminating sport promotion per se – are suggested. Recommendations are targeted for sport‐related and non‐sport‐related products as well as teams and leagues/conferences.

Originality/value

This paper is the first to suggest a link between adolescent hero worship of sport celebrities and psychologically dangerous celebrity worship by adults.

Details

Young Consumers, vol. 11 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1747-3616

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 19 June 2018

Hussain Tariq and Qingxiong (Derek) Weng

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the link between perceived subordinate performance and abusive supervision. From the perspective of moral exclusion theory, the authors…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the link between perceived subordinate performance and abusive supervision. From the perspective of moral exclusion theory, the authors examine cooperative goal interdependence and competitive goal interdependence as key boundary conditions to hypothesize and demonstrate the direct negative relationship between low-performing subordinates and abusive supervision. Within the moral exclusion framework, supervisors may strategically abuse low performers when cooperative goal interdependence is high, or competitive goal interdependence is low. Moreover, this study explores the impact of abusive supervision on subordinate’s objective performance.

Design/methodology/approach

This research employs two independent studies to examine the antecedents and consequences of abusive supervision based on respondents from a Fortune 500 company located in Anhui province of People’s Republic of China (PRC). Study 1 uses a time lagged, single source survey while Study 2 employs multi-source, multi-wave data. The results support the integrated model.

Findings

Across the two studies, the results showed that the direct negative relationship between perceived subordinate performance and abusive supervision was found to be stronger when cooperative goal interdependence was high and when competitive goal interdependence was low. Study 2 also revealed the negative impact of abusive supervision on subordinate’s objective performance and that the conditional indirect effect of subordinate’s perceived performance on objective performance via abusive supervision was contingent on the extent of cooperative and competitive goal interdependence.

Originality/value

The results clearly demonstrate that supervisors are likely to turn to abusive supervision in response to poor performing subordinates but that the tendency to use abuse as an instrumental strategy for improving subordinate performance is dependent on the nature of goal interdependence between the supervisor and subordinates’ goals. The research also shows that although supervisors may turn to abusive supervision under certain goal interdependence conditions, it is not an effective strategy for actually improving subordinate objective performance. In fact, it has the opposite effect.

Book part
Publication date: 12 August 2014

Jeffrey van den Scott

Howard Becker’s theory for the sociology of art (including music) revolves around the simple, and often overlooked fact, “All artistic work, like all human activity, involves the…

Abstract

Howard Becker’s theory for the sociology of art (including music) revolves around the simple, and often overlooked fact, “All artistic work, like all human activity, involves the joint activity of a number, often a large number, of people.” Among Becker’s writing about music, he presents an idea that I find is still relevant today, namely, that sociological and ethnomusicological work seem to be two hands of a single body that have little idea of what each other are doing. Drawing on the work of scholars such as Becker and Kay Kaufman Shelemay, I propose a model for the construction of the music event that highlights the relationship among the many systems behind the musical experience. I provide a case study of Inuit throat singing to demonstrate the effectiveness of this model in trying to explore the relationships among music, culture, and society.

Details

Revisiting Symbolic Interaction in Music Studies and New Interpretive Works
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78350-838-9

Keywords

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