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Article
Publication date: 22 November 2011

Younghee Noh

This paper seeks to rediscover the most suitable efficiency evaluation variables (input and output variables) for digital libraries and to employ the data envelopment…

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Abstract

Purpose

This paper seeks to rediscover the most suitable efficiency evaluation variables (input and output variables) for digital libraries and to employ the data envelopment analysis (DEA) model to measure the resource utilization efficiency of university libraries.

Design/methodology/approach

In order to analyze and evaluate university library efficiency, the paper introduces the DEA‐CCR Model and the DEA‐BCC Model. Based on these research tools, the Technical Efficiency (CCR*BCC) was determined. First, a reference group was created with a 100 percent efficiency rate, then the factors contributing to inefficient DMUs were analyzed, and the difference in the efficiency rate compared according to the different governing bodies of the libraries. Finally, the difference of efficiency according to the introduction and rejection of electronic resources was analyzed. It was possible to measure the technical efficiency, pure‐technical efficiency, and scale efficiency.

Findings

The results showed that the efficiency of university libraries varied significantly according to whether or not electronic resources were included in the evaluation. In addition, the findings confirmed decision making units (DMUs) have a 100 percent efficiency rate and a low efficiency rate as well as proposed benchmarking DMUs for inefficient DMUs and a direction for future improvements.

Originality/value

The paper identifies that there was a significant difference in efficiency, according to the presence of electronic resources in university libraries.

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 2008

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339

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Details

Journal of Consumer Marketing, vol. 25 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0736-3761

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Book part
Publication date: 6 August 2018

Eliav Danziger and Leif Danziger

This chapter analyzes the effects of introducing a graduated minimum wage in a model with optimal income taxation in which a government seeks to maximize social welfare…

Abstract

This chapter analyzes the effects of introducing a graduated minimum wage in a model with optimal income taxation in which a government seeks to maximize social welfare. It shows that the optimal graduated minimum wage increases social welfare by increasing the low-productivity workers’ consumption and bringing it closer to the first-best. The chapter also describes how the graduated minimum wage in a social welfare optimum depends on important economy characteristics such as the government’s revenue needs, the social welfare weight of low-productivity workers, and the numbers and productivities of the different types of workers.

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Transitions through the Labor Market
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78756-462-6

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Book part
Publication date: 26 August 2015

Andrew E. Clark, Conchita D’Ambrosio and Simone Ghislandi

We consider the link between poverty and subjective well-being, and focus in particular on the role of time. We use panel data on 49,000 individuals living in Germany from…

Abstract

We consider the link between poverty and subjective well-being, and focus in particular on the role of time. We use panel data on 49,000 individuals living in Germany from 1992 to 2012 to uncover three empirical relationships. First, life satisfaction falls with both the incidence and intensity of contemporaneous poverty. Second, poverty scars: those who have been poor in the past report lower life satisfaction today, even when out of poverty. Last, the order of poverty spells matters: for a given number of years in poverty, satisfaction is lower when the years are linked together. As such, poverty persistence reduces well-being. These effects differ by population subgroups.

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Measurement of Poverty, Deprivation, and Economic Mobility
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78560-386-0

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Article
Publication date: 24 June 2021

Mahmoud Shahin

Through portfolio diversification, the author identifies the risk sharing deposit contract in a three-period model that maximizes the ex ante expected utility of depositors.

Abstract

Purpose

Through portfolio diversification, the author identifies the risk sharing deposit contract in a three-period model that maximizes the ex ante expected utility of depositors.

Design/methodology/approach

In this paper, the author extends the study by Allen and Gale (1998) by adding a long-term riskless investment opportunity to the original portfolio of a short-term liquid asset and a long-term risky illiquid asset.

Findings

Unlike Allen and Gale, there are no information-based bank runs in equilibrium. In addition, the model can improve consumers' welfare over the Allen and Gale model. The author also shows that the bank will choose to liquidate the cheaper investments, in terms of the gain-loss ratios for the two types of existing long-term assets, when there is liquidity shortage in some cases. Such a policy reduces the liquidation cost and enables the bank to meet the outstanding liability to depositors without large liquidation losses.

Originality/value

The author believe that the reader would be interested in this article because it is relevant to real world where depositors rush to withdraw their deposits from a bank if there is negative information about future prospect of the bank asset portfolio and bank investment. Economists and financial analysts need to determine the suitable mechanism to improve the stability of the bank and the depositor welfare.

Details

Journal of Economic Studies, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3585

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Book part
Publication date: 30 September 2014

Jürgen Faik and Uwe Fachinger

In the wake of the Stiglitz Commission, we assess German economic well-being by considering income, wealth and consumption. A decomposition approach is used to test for…

Abstract

In the wake of the Stiglitz Commission, we assess German economic well-being by considering income, wealth and consumption. A decomposition approach is used to test for corresponding inequality differences of these well-being dimensions. Total inequality is decomposed into within- and between-group inequality (via a normalised coefficient of variation). The decompositions are categorised into those that refer to socio-demographic characteristics (place of residence, age, household type) and those belonging to different well-being (sub-)categories (potential and net income, expenditure and wealth categories). The empirical analyses are performed for Germany using the 2008 German Sample Survey of Income and Expenditure. By decomposing German well-being inequality in great detail, we shed light on its dimensions. Our analyses illustrate that it is necessary to consider all well-being dimensions to make statements about the material well-being of private households or individuals.

Details

Economic Well-Being and Inequality: Papers from the Fifth ECINEQ Meeting
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78350-556-2

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Book part
Publication date: 16 November 2016

Oded Stark and Marcin Jakubek

Let there be two individuals: “rich,” and “poor.” Due to inefficiency of the income redistribution policy, if a social planner were to tax the rich in order to transfer to…

Abstract

Let there be two individuals: “rich,” and “poor.” Due to inefficiency of the income redistribution policy, if a social planner were to tax the rich in order to transfer to the poor, only a fraction of the taxed income would be given to the poor. Under such inefficiency and a standard utility specification, a Rawlsian social planner who seeks to maximize the utility of the worst-off individual will select a different allocation of incomes than a utilitarian social planner who seeks to maximize the sum of the individuals’ utilities. However, when individuals prefer not only to have more income but also not to have low status conceptualized as low relative income, and when this distaste is incorporated in the individuals’ utility functions with a weight that is greater than a specified critical level, then a utilitarian social planner will select the very same income distribution as a Rawlsian social planner.

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Article
Publication date: 4 January 2021

Vikram Kumar and Srivastava Granthi

The purpose of this study is to understand the basics of interactions of groundwater and surface water, which is needed for effective management of water resources.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to understand the basics of interactions of groundwater and surface water, which is needed for effective management of water resources.

Design/methodology/approach

The experimental setup was framed using curved flume and the straight flume, which simulates the model of river and groundwater storage, respectively. The model set up further consists, downstream, central and upstream sections where 14 observation wells, which are arranged at a measured distance from the canal side.

Findings

Exit gradient is higher at downstream when the average head differences between canal and river are 31.9 cm and 35.7 cm. Free seepage height is more in the downstream wells than upstream and central wells. At the downstream section, there is a greater chance of instability of the riverbank.

Research limitations/implications

Results will be used for better planning of hydraulic structural design.

Practical implications

Results will help in storing the large water and better irrigation planning for the water acute states and locations.

Originality/value

The originality is own developed physical model and its own first type to understand the basic of interaction and effects.

Details

World Journal of Engineering, vol. 18 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1708-5284

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Article
Publication date: 12 October 2020

Tolulope Osinubi and Simplice Asongu

This study examines the effect of globalization on female economic participation (FEP) in MINT (Mexico, Indonesia, Nigeria and Turkey) and BRICS (Brazil, Russia, India…

Abstract

Purpose

This study examines the effect of globalization on female economic participation (FEP) in MINT (Mexico, Indonesia, Nigeria and Turkey) and BRICS (Brazil, Russia, India, China and South Africa) countries between 2004 and 2018.

Design/methodology/approach

Four measures of globalization are employed and sourced from KOF globalization index, 2018, while the female labour force participation rate is a proxy for FEP. The empirical evidence is based on the Pooled Mean Group (PMG) estimator.

Findings

The findings of the PMG estimator from the Panel ARDL method reveal that political and overall globalization in MINT and BRICS countries have a positive impact on FEP, whereas social globalization exerts a negative impact on FEP in the long-run. It is observed that economic globalization has no long-run effect on FEP. Contrarily, all the measures of globalization reflect no short-run effect on FEP. This supports the argument that globalization has no immediate effect on FEP. Thus, it is recommended that both MINT and BRICS countries should find a way of improving the process of globalization generally to empower women to be involved in economic activities.

Originality/value

This study complements the extant literature by focusing on how globalization dynamics influence FEP in the MINT and BRICS countries.

Details

Journal of Economic Studies, vol. 48 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3585

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Article
Publication date: 9 April 2018

Sarbajit Chaudhuri and Anindya Biswas

Some recent empirical studies have found that developing countries are more prone to external terms-of-trade shocks compared to developed nations. With this background…

Abstract

Purpose

Some recent empirical studies have found that developing countries are more prone to external terms-of-trade shocks compared to developed nations. With this background, the purpose of this paper is to the question of whether developing countries possess any built-in mechanism that can cope with external terms-of-trade (TOT) shocks both theoretically and empirically.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper uses a two-sector, full-employment general equilibrium model with endogenous labour market distortion to conduct its theoretical analysis and then uses an annual panel dataset of 13 small developing countries over the recent time period of 2000-2012 to substantiate its theoretical findings.

Findings

Theoretically, this study finds that developing countries possess an inherent shock-absorbing mechanism that stems from their peculiar institutional characteristics and can lessen the gravity of detrimental welfare consequence of exogenous TOT movements. This analytical result has been found to be empirically valid based on a panel dataset of 13 countries from 2000-2012.

Originality/value

The authors’ analyses suggest that that the developing countries should take utmost caution before adopting the policy of labour market reform because these might impair the effectiveness of their in-built shock-absorbing mechanism against adverse international price movements.

Details

Indian Growth and Development Review, vol. 11 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8254

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