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Article

David M. Lascelles and Barrie G. Dale

The UMIST Quality Management Centre is involved in four main activities: (i) research into Total Quality Management, (ii) the operation of a TQM Multi‐Company Teaching…

Abstract

The UMIST Quality Management Centre is involved in four main activities: (i) research into Total Quality Management, (ii) the operation of a TQM Multi‐Company Teaching Programme involving eight industrial collaborators at any one time, (iii) the Centre houses the Ford Motor Company Regional Training Centre for training suppliers in total quality excellence and statistical process control, and (iv) TQM consultancy, including the Q‐Share initiative. This latter activity is carried out by Q‐MAS Ltd. (a campus based company in which UMIST has a significant shareholding).

Details

Management Research News, vol. 14 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0140-9174

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Article

D.M. Lascelles and B.G. Dale

This monograph presents some findings, based on four pieces of workfunded by the Department of Trade and Industry, on the influence of theNational Quality Campaign on UK…

Abstract

This monograph presents some findings, based on four pieces of work funded by the Department of Trade and Industry, on the influence of the National Quality Campaign on UK industry. Amongst the main conclusions are that the campaign material has been relatively successful in reaching its prime target of senior management, the majority of respondents have found the material to be useful and believe that the campaign has benefited their organisation in terms of increased awareness of the importance of total quality management and that few chief executives are actively involved in the process of quality improvement. It is also pointed out that respondents have been selective in their choice of material and chief executives were more discriminating than their subordinates. The selection of material appears to be dependent upon brochure content, respondents′ position in the organisational hierarchy and respondents′ perception of the relevance of material. There is little doubt that people have high expectations of Government in continuing to promote national awareness of quality management and disseminating quality‐related information. The monograph goes on to explore possible future initiatives along the lines of a Pan‐European dimension.

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International Journal of Operations & Production Management, vol. 9 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3577

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Article

D.M. Lascelles and B.G. Dale

A three‐year study, partly funded by the Quality, Design and Education Division of the Department of Trade and Industry, has been carried out on the general subject of…

Abstract

A three‐year study, partly funded by the Quality, Design and Education Division of the Department of Trade and Industry, has been carried out on the general subject of quality improvement. As part of this work a literature survey of the English language papers was conducted on such issues as the effects of international competition, the nature of quality management, organisations and change, leadership, how companies set about quality improvement and supplier development. In order to examine topics pertinent to the research subject, the search covered not only the general literature on quality management but also the literature on corporate strategy, marketing, organisational psychology and operations management. The main findings from the literature search are presented and guidance is provided on some authoritative reading on quality improvement.

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International Journal of Quality & Reliability Management, vol. 5 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-671X

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Article

M. Li and J.B. Yang

In response to the criticism on the measurement system of self‐assessment against the European Foundation for Quality Management (EFQM) model, this paper reports the…

Abstract

In response to the criticism on the measurement system of self‐assessment against the European Foundation for Quality Management (EFQM) model, this paper reports the development of a more scientific and accurate scoring method. The decision model constructed has focused on the “processes” criterion of the EFQM model and can perform three main tasks: to score the self‐assessment submission document; to identify strengths and areas for improvement; and to simulate different scenarios for improvement planning. The model was implemented and tested using two award simulation documents from an electricity distribution utility and a water‐supply company. The results for one of the companies are reported and analysed in this paper. The analysis of the results has proved the reliability and accuracy of the new model. Using the decision model, two systematic methods were developed to identify strengths and areas for improvement and the findings are reported. The model's ability to link self‐assessment with the strategic‐planning process is also commented upon.

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International Journal of Quality & Reliability Management, vol. 20 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-671X

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Article

D.M. Lascelles and B.G. Dale

The barriers to supplier development are examined under the broad headings of: poor communication and feedback, supplier complacency, misguided supplier improvement…

Abstract

The barriers to supplier development are examined under the broad headings of: poor communication and feedback, supplier complacency, misguided supplier improvement objectives, the credibility of the customer as viewed by their suppliers, and misconceptions regarding purchasing power. Key steps involved in a supplier development programme are listed.

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International Journal of Quality & Reliability Management, vol. 7 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-671X

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Article

D.M. Lascelles and B.G. Dale

Research carried out at the University of Manchester Institute of Science & Technology over a ten‐year period has led to the authors identifying six levels of TQM…

Abstract

Research carried out at the University of Manchester Institute of Science & Technology over a ten‐year period has led to the authors identifying six levels of TQM adoption. The article examines all six in detail, moving from level one: uncommitted, through to level six‐ world‐class. Agues that the levels are not inevitable for every organization as it progresses through a TQM project, but they do indicate common characteristics and behaviour in relation to TQM. Focuses on Uncommitted, Drifters, Tool pushers, Improvers, Award winners and World‐class organisations, giving examples of activity typical to each category. Concludes by inviting managers to consider the six levels of TQM adoption and place their organization in one of them.

Details

The TQM Magazine, vol. 3 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0954-478X

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Article

B.G. Dale and D.M. Lascelles

Describes six levels of TQM adoption (or lack of it) which are termed uncommitted, drifters, tool pushers, improvers, award winners and world‐class. The levels are not…

Abstract

Describes six levels of TQM adoption (or lack of it) which are termed uncommitted, drifters, tool pushers, improvers, award winners and world‐class. The levels are not necessarily the stages which organizations pass on their TQM journey, rather they are characteristics and behaviour which organizations display in relation to TQM at one point in time. Finds that the levels can be used as a positioning model to aid organizations in identifying their weaknesses and help them in taking the next steps forward in the continual challenge of continuous improvement. The characteristics underpinning the six levels are also helpful in highlighting different perceptions of progress at different levels of the organization, with respect to continuous improvement. Argues that the characteristics of the more advanced adoptions should provide the requisite inspiration to those less advanced to highlight the type of issues to which attention needs to be given.

Details

The TQM Magazine, vol. 9 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0954-478X

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Article

Kevin Bright and Cary L. Cooper

Examines the management of quality from the perspective oforganizational culture change. Discusses the nature of quality and theevolution of the management of quality in…

Abstract

Examines the management of quality from the perspective of organizational culture change. Discusses the nature of quality and the evolution of the management of quality in relation to key issues arising from the literature on organizational culture. It is found that total quality management (TQM) makes a number of assumptions about organizational culture. Adopts an integrationist perspective, with culture defined in terms of something an organization has, as opposed to something an organization is. Presents a tentative model of the relationship implied between TQM and organizational culture. A number of questions emerge, not least of which concern the strength and direction of this relationship. The culture perspective is likely to challenge some of the basic assumptions found in the TQM literature. In so doing, it may inform organizational attempts to raise levels of quality.

Details

Journal of Managerial Psychology, vol. 8 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-3946

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Book part

Giovanna Culot

The foundations of quality management have been laid throughout the history of civilization. Since the dawn of industrialization, as a consequence of an increasing…

Abstract

The foundations of quality management have been laid throughout the history of civilization. Since the dawn of industrialization, as a consequence of an increasing division of labor, the approach has evolved dramatically in terms of analytical tools and organizational practices. This evolution is outlined in this chapter. Starting from an overview of the different possible meanings of quality, the phases characterizing modern quality management (e.g., quality control, quality assurance, etc.) are described. Geopolitical and macroeconomic considerations are factored in to account for an uneven development across countries (e.g., Japan vs US). A general trajectory is traced as the scope of quality has constantly broadened to encompass not only the product, but also interorganizational processes and the impact on the environment and the society of the company activities. Against this backdrop, the current phase is seen as a polarization between a “classic” engineering approach and a more holistic view, questioning the same boundaries of the discipline.

Details

Quality Management: Tools, Methods, and Standards
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78769-804-8

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Book part

Abstract

Details

(Dis)Honesty in Management
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78190-602-6

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