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Article
Publication date: 1 September 1997

Everett E. Adam, Lawrence M. Corbett, Benito E. Flores, Norma J. Harrison, T.S. Lee, Boo‐Ho Rho, Jaime Ribera, Danny Samson and Roy Westbrook

Investigates what approaches to quality lead to best quality and financial performance across different regions of the world. Reports a survey of 977 firms in Asia/South…

Abstract

Investigates what approaches to quality lead to best quality and financial performance across different regions of the world. Reports a survey of 977 firms in Asia/South Pacific, Europe, and North America. Fifty‐two items that suggest how a firm might improve quality were factor analysed and grouped into 11 factors, each factor a broader approach to quality improvement than any one item. Actual quality was measured eight different ways. Each approach to quality improvement (factor) was correlated to each quality measure, as well as to several financial measures. The results suggest that a company’s approach to quality correlates to actual quality and to a lesser extent to financial performance. The major factors found to influence actual quality were the organization’s knowledge of quality management, its degree of customer focus, and management involvement. When the task was to predict performance outcomes in any region, the specific factors that best predict performance were found to vary from region to region. That is, there were specific models within a region that better predicted performance than the model which predicted performance across all regions.

Details

International Journal of Operations & Production Management, vol. 17 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3577

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 1994

K.E. Maani, M.S. Putterill and D.G. Sluti

Despite a strong research output in quality in recent years, theliterature is still scant in empirical studies of commonly held qualitytheories. Empirically investigates…

Abstract

Despite a strong research output in quality in recent years, the literature is still scant in empirical studies of commonly held quality theories. Empirically investigates the operational and strategic impact of improved process quality and describes the construction of a model of process quality and its correlates in manufacturing. Using empirical data, the study performs a micro assessment of the impact of quality on operations performance. Implications for the business unit as a whole are also considered. Since the research domain of the study is manufacturing industry, the conformance dimension of quality has been adopted as a more precise and measurable definition than those followed in other research. Structural equation modelling (SEM) is used for analysing the magnitude and direction of hypothesized relationships, a rigorous and reliable way of testing multivariate data and path models. Research findings generally support the consensus view that there is a favourable impact of enhanced quality in the form of improvements in productivity, inprocess inventory, on‐time delivery, and manufacturing cost. Flow‐through effects on business performance were also noted though not in all dimensions. This research complements marketing‐oriented evaluation which has been a feature of approaches to date.

Details

International Journal of Quality & Reliability Management, vol. 11 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-671X

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2000

Sime Curkovic, Shawnee K. Vickery and Cornelia Droge

This paper examines the competitive dimensions of quality for first tier suppliers in the automotive industry. A theoretically relevant set of quality variables is…

Abstract

This paper examines the competitive dimensions of quality for first tier suppliers in the automotive industry. A theoretically relevant set of quality variables is identified from the literature. The results of a factor analysis show that quality is a two dimensional construct in the automotive supply industry. The core dimensions of quality are: product quality, which is primarily focused on design superiority and performance of the physical product; and service quality, which comprises both pre‐ and post‐sale service. The study reveals that both product quality and service quality are related to overall firm performance, regardless of whether asset based, investment based, or market based measures are used.

Details

International Journal of Operations & Production Management, vol. 20 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3577

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Article
Publication date: 1 July 2006

Milé Terziovski

There is considerable confusion surrounding the applied role and business value of TQM. Anecdotal evidence and empirical studies in the literature suggest considerable…

Abstract

Purpose

There is considerable confusion surrounding the applied role and business value of TQM. Anecdotal evidence and empirical studies in the literature suggest considerable variability in the performance of TQM. The purpose of the paper is to test the strength of the relationship between quality management practice and two key operational performance measures: productivity improvement and customer satisfaction.

Design/methodology/approach

A large database consisting of 962 responses from Australian manufacturing firms and 379 responses from New Zealand manufacturing firms is used to test the hypotheses.

Findings

The major finding of the paper is that multiple quality management practices when implemented simultaneously have a significant and positive effect on productivity improvement and customer satisfaction.

Research limitations/implications

The results presented in this paper are drawn from one industry at one point in time. Generalising the results to other industries should be done with caution. This study, therefore, aims to motivate further research on the link between quality strategies and organisational performance.

Practical implications

The main implication that emerges from the paper is that managers in manufacturing firms should place more emphasis on “soft” quality management practices (e.g. unity of purpose/elimination of barriers between individuals and departments) and less emphasis on “hard” practices (e.g. process control).

Originality/value

The paper fulfils an identified need on the value of quality practice and offers practical implications to managers and stimulates further research on the relationship between quality practice and operational performance in non‐manufacturing industries.

Details

Management Research News, vol. 29 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0140-9174

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 1999

P. Mandal, K. Shah, P.E.D. Love and H. Li

Previous surveys on quality management have shown that increasingly firms in Australia are adopting and implementing quality control tools and a total quality management…

Abstract

Previous surveys on quality management have shown that increasingly firms in Australia are adopting and implementing quality control tools and a total quality management philosophy. This paper attempts to determine the effectiveness of quality initiatives that have been implemented and integrated within Australian manufacturing firms. The authors used a combination of questionnaire surveys and interviews to gather information from quality professionals about the different types of quality tools being implemented by firms. The findings of this study are compared with other national and international surveys. A major finding of this study is that the trend of quality initiatives being implemented has been increasing since the early 1980s and the increase is observed in all functional areas of manufacturing. In addition, it reported that manufacturing firms are more conscious about quality and customer satisfaction than ever before. This paper attempts to establish relationships between the adoption of quality initiatives and its benefits with respect to reducing rejects and labour disputes, and increasing revenue.

Details

International Journal of Quality & Reliability Management, vol. 16 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-671X

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Book part
Publication date: 14 September 2007

Paul Rouse, Martin Putterill and Z.F. LI MICHAEL

Abstract

Details

Handbook of Transport Modelling
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-08-045376-7

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 2001

Shams‐ur Rahman

Recently, a highly credible report suggested that the quality philosophy and quality standards have not effectively reached the core of Australia’s commercial base …

Abstract

Recently, a highly credible report suggested that the quality philosophy and quality standards have not effectively reached the core of Australia’s commercial base – 780,000 small and medium enterprises (SMEs). Drawing on this critical finding, this study aims at providing empirical evidence on the differences in total quality management (TQM) implementation and organisational performance of SMEs in Western Australia, with and without ISO 9000 certification. Using the criteria of the Australian Business Excellence (ABE) framework as a guide, a questionnaire with 36 items was developed, checked for reliability and validity and applied to create a self‐assessment measure of TQM practices. The results showed that there was no significant difference between SMEs with and without ISO 9000 certification with respect to TQM implementation and organisational performance. This result concurs with the findings of studies conducted in the context of large organisations in Australia.

Details

International Journal of Quality & Reliability Management, vol. 18 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-671X

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Article
Publication date: 20 September 2011

Tipparat Laohavichien, Lawrence D. Fredendall and R. Stephen Cantrell

This study aims to examine the effects of leadership behaviors on quality management (QM) practices and their effects on quality performance of manufacturing companies in…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to examine the effects of leadership behaviors on quality management (QM) practices and their effects on quality performance of manufacturing companies in Thailand. The hypotheses were that leadership leads to infrastructure practices, which in turn support quality practices. These quality practices improve quality performance. This was tested using a structural equation model. In general, the model was supported although all of the individual practices examined here were not statistically significant.

Design/methodology/approach

A survey of quality managers of firms located within Thailand was conducted and analyzed using structural equation modeling (SEM) to determine how leadership affected quality practices which in turn affected quality performance. The interactions of leadership with infrastructure and core variables were tested and found to be insignificant.

Findings

The SEM established that leadership behaviors supported one infrastructure practice – human resource management, which in turn supported one core QM practice – statistical process control. While six dimensions of transformational and two dimensions of transactional analysis were tested, only two dimensions of transformational and one dimension of transactional leadership were retained. However, these did load onto one leadership second‐order factor. The interactions of leadership with infrastructure and core practices were not significant. The core practices significantly affected three quality performance measures – product returns, product rework and scrap levels.

Research limitations/implications

Further investigation is needed to understand how the Thai culture affects the use of quality practices. Since there was only one respondent per company, the study needs additional validation. Further investigation of the transformational and transactional leadership constructs is necessary.

Practical implications

This suggests to international managers that many of the quality techniques are useful in both developing countries and developed countries. It also suggests that transactional leadership was more effective than prior literature expected it be.

Originality/value

This paper demonstrates that leadership in Thailand is important to the implementation of quality practices. The findings indicate that leadership is an important component of QM and affects infrastructure practices which in turn affect core quality practices. Finally, these core practices affect quality performance. This confirms prior QM models. A major finding is the importance of the contingent punishment dimension of transactional leadership. The confirmatory factor analysis suggests that the individual dimensions of transformational and transactional leadership are not reliable as currently operationalized and further work is needed to develop reliable leadership scales.

Details

International Journal of Operations & Production Management, vol. 31 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3577

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 1997

Ross L. Chapman, Peter Charles Murray and Robert Mellor

Despite the increasing international evidence that has identified quality of product and service and a culture of continuous improvement to be essential for long‐term…

Abstract

Despite the increasing international evidence that has identified quality of product and service and a culture of continuous improvement to be essential for long‐term competitive advantage, many Australian firms apparently remain unconvinced of the substantial gains available through a focused commitment to quality and continuous improvement. Anecdotal evidence and limited previous research suggest that this is at least partly due to the often touted cost barrier and the failure of firms to integrate quality improvement developments with their strategic planning activities. Discusses specific outcomes of a survey of medium‐sized manufacturing and service firms in Australia. Categorizes questions relating to strategic aspects of quality and continuous improvement into five major indicator groups, related to their commitment to the integration of quality and strategic planning initiatives. Compares mean scores for these indicators to standard financial performance and productivity measures, to test the hypothesis that there is a definite link between a firm’s commitment to quality improvement and its financial and marketplace performance. Also compares individual question responses relating to continuous improvement and strategic planning to selected performance indicators in an attempt to identify quality‐improvement activities which may have a particularly influential impact on performance.

Details

International Journal of Quality & Reliability Management, vol. 14 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-671X

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Article
Publication date: 16 January 2007

Thawatchai Jitpaiboon and S. Subba Rao

The manufacturing community has embraced the concept of total quality management (TQM) but little research has been published on how each aspect of quality is measured…

Abstract

Purpose

The manufacturing community has embraced the concept of total quality management (TQM) but little research has been published on how each aspect of quality is measured. This paper provides a deeper understanding of current quality measures and recommendations for appropriate TQM practices. This article adopts meta‐analysis approach to study issues concerning reliability of TQM measures and find consensus on the relationship between TQM practices and organizational performance across studies. The research findings and managerial implications are discussed.

Design/methodology/approach

A meta‐analysis approach was used to study 421 items relating to TQM practices in 50 refereed articles.

Findings

Items were categorized according to Malcolm Baldrige National Quality Award (MBNQA) categories. A total of 77 items were not matched and eliminated. Findings reveal that the mean value of reliability coefficients (α) is 0.84 in TQM research compared to 0.77 in marketing and 0.81 in MIS. The mean values of α are significantly different across studies based on years and nations. The mean values of α from the nations of North America, South America, Africa, and Asia are significantly higher than those of Europe and Australia. Top management support shows the highest mean effect size of the relationship between TQM practices and organizational performance compared to other relationships.

Originality/value

Meta‐analysis is used to enhance the understanding, applicability, and generalizability of a comparable research with diverse results. It does not require the original data. Using data from already published TQM research, meta‐analysis can be used to improve the understanding of current TQM issues manufacturing firms are facing.

Details

International Journal of Quality & Reliability Management, vol. 24 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-671X

Keywords

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