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1 – 10 of 91
Article
Publication date: 1 March 2005

B.D. Ilozor and D.B. Ilozor

Presented is a path analysis of causal connections between several open‐plan attributes and discrete effective facilities space management aspects of commercial offices in…

578

Abstract

Presented is a path analysis of causal connections between several open‐plan attributes and discrete effective facilities space management aspects of commercial offices in Sydney. The aim is to use quantitative estimates to demonstrate in structural equations the effect coefficients of the complex connections between selected open‐plan and effective facilities space management variables. Over one hundred open‐plan offices in the Sydney CBD were examined. Some open‐plan attributes were found to have direct impacts on several effective facilities space management variables, while others exhibited indirect effects through management control aspects. In most cases, management control reduced the effect coefficients. This paper concludes that, with dedicated management control, the impact of open‐plan on facilities space management may be less extensive. The implication of this result is for re‐engineering of work environments to consider aspects of management that invariably moderates and/or intervenes in the relationship of space, people and work process.

Details

Journal of Engineering, Design and Technology, vol. 3 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1726-0531

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 July 2006

B.D. Ilozor and D.B. Ilozor

The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate the effect coefficients of the complex connections between selected open‐plan office and effective facilities space management…

1230

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate the effect coefficients of the complex connections between selected open‐plan office and effective facilities space management variables.

Design/methodology/approach

Data on offices, management control and effective facilities space management measures were collected through questionnaires administered to 102 facilities space managers of 102 randomly selected open‐plan offices in Sydney.

Findings

Some open‐plan attributes were found to have direct impacts on several effective facilities space management variables, while others exhibited indirect effects through management control aspects. In most cases, management control considerably reduced the effect coefficients.

Research limitations/implications

While the study is limited to discrete effective facilities space management aspects of only selected open‐plan commercial offices in Sydney, the research implications though far‐reaching, may not be universally applicable. However, a better understanding of the associations provides directions to where attention would be fruitfully focused in future research replications and practice.

Practical implications

The practical implication of this result is for re‐engineering of work environments to consider aspects of management that invariably moderates and/or intervenes in the relationship of space, people and work process. This paper concludes that, with dedicated management control, the impact of open‐plan on facilities space management may be less extensive.

Originality/value

The paper's utilization of this quantitative approach is novel to understanding the connections between office attributes and effective facilities management. This approach offers a veritable alternative to examining and validating these constructs that are useful to space providers, designers, managers and users in understanding the interactions between space, people and process.

Details

Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management, vol. 13 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-9988

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 July 1999

Benedict D. Ilozor and Jacob O. Oluwoye

Presents findings from research on open‐plan measures in the determination of facilities space management. The aim of the research is to determine the impact of open‐plan…

1479

Abstract

Presents findings from research on open‐plan measures in the determination of facilities space management. The aim of the research is to determine the impact of open‐plan measures on the effectiveness of facilities space management of CBD commercial office buildings ‐ the end‐view being to establish criteria for effective management and re‐engineering of open‐plan workspaces. A review of the literature reveals that this issue has not been definitively investigated. Hence, open‐plan measures remain virtually under‐exploited for the purpose of greater effectiveness of facilities space management. A sample of 102 open‐plan offices was studied, and data analysed using descriptive (such as mean, standard deviation, range) and inferential statistics (such as Spearman’s rho and partial correlations, multiple regression and path analysis). Direct and indirect associations were found between open‐plan and the effectiveness of facilities space management measures. However, some of the relationships were partly and wholly explained by management control measures. Though only multiple regression results are presented here, for reasons of brevity, this study concludes that, in many ways, certain open‐plan measures independently determine the effectiveness of facilities space management. This conclusion serves as a basis for developing criteria for effective management and re‐engineering of open‐plan workspaces.

Details

Facilities, vol. 17 no. 7/8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-2772

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 May 2002

D.B. Ilozor and B.D. Ilozor

This paper reports findings on the significance of management communication strategies to telecommuting, based on a survey of telecommuters at IBM Australia. With…

1878

Abstract

This paper reports findings on the significance of management communication strategies to telecommuting, based on a survey of telecommuters at IBM Australia. With increased adoption of telecommuting, many strategies have been proffered to ensure that telecommuters have appreciable levels of job satisfaction. Low levels of job satisfaction can lead to unduly rapid employee turnover that is detrimental to business operation. The objective of this paper is to ascertain the perceptions of telecommuters at IBM Australia on a number of telecommuting practice measures, and to suggest how job satisfaction can be improved and maintained at high levels by giving greater attention to particular communication management strategies in Australia. Although the management communication strategies proffered in the literature appear to apply generally, this study concludes that a few aspects are distinctively applicable to the Australian environment. Those aspects should be specifically noted by those interested in benefiting from telecommuting practice.

Details

Logistics Information Management, vol. 15 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-6053

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 January 2002

Ben Dozie Ilozor, Peter E.D. Love and Graham Treloar

A current facilities management discourse seeks to discover how the built environment promotes or retards organisational change. However, whether or not significant change…

2455

Abstract

A current facilities management discourse seeks to discover how the built environment promotes or retards organisational change. However, whether or not significant change arises at all is yet to be definitively established. Hence, a contribution to the school of thought in this direction is considered important. This research investigated organisational performance relative to innovative work settings. The aim of the study was to determine whether organisational performance and, hence, change are indeed brought about by innovative work settings. A sample of 102 work settings was studied, and several null hypotheses on innovative work settings and organisational performance were tested using the Kruskal‐Wallis H test. Although subtle shifts were observed in the aspects of organisational performance that seem predicated on innovative work settings, to some extent the proposition that the physical properties and design of the workplace can influence organisational performance was validated.

Details

Facilities, vol. 20 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-2772

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 28 March 2008

B.D. Ilozor

This paper aims to identify and discuss those architectural and building features associated with certain faults and defects, and by implication, impact preservation of…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to identify and discuss those architectural and building features associated with certain faults and defects, and by implication, impact preservation of buildings' structural and fabrics integrity.

Design/methodology/approach

Building condition survey and analysis was conducted.

Findings

It was observed that the differing structural and fabrics integrity of these buildings overtime was connected most significantly to their different roofing styles and features.

Research limitations/implications

Investigation was limited to two distinct buildings located on the same block at Hampton University, Virginia, USA.

Practical implications

This finding underscores the importance of choosing and designing features of buildings with their operation, maintainability, and life‐cycle preservation in mind, if structural and fabrics integrity must be maintained, and sustainability achieved, while restoration dollars are saved.

Originality/value

Ilozor et al.'s building defects cause‐effects model was applied in understanding the contributions of various architectural and building features to certain faults, defects or failures that impact the preservation of buildings' structural and fabrics integrity.

Details

Journal of Engineering, Design and Technology, vol. 6 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1726-0531

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 January 2002

M.I. Okoroh, P.P. Gombera and B.D. Ilozor

This paper presents research findings of 365 NHS Trust executives in the UK and builds on work carried out on risk perceptions and treatment in facilities management…

3748

Abstract

This paper presents research findings of 365 NHS Trust executives in the UK and builds on work carried out on risk perceptions and treatment in facilities management operations and business support activities in the NHS Trusts. The research utilises a business approach of viewing healthcare facilities not only as fixed “assets” occupying hospital sites and space, but it also considers them as that “tangible” part of the service chain process underpinning the provision of clinical services to both internal (departments or directorates) and external customers. The research found that customer satisfaction, service delivery certainty, customer involvement, service quality reliability, health and safety are highly rated by the NHS executives. The paper classifies healthcare related risk constructs into seven elements namely: customer care, corporate, legal, commercial finance and economics, business transfer, and facilities transmitted.

Details

Facilities, vol. 20 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-2772

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 July 2002

M.I. Okoroh, C. Jones and B.D. Ilozor

When applied to hotels, the terms “facilities management” and “hotel management” are in many ways synonymous. Certainly effective management of the physical aspects in the…

4410

Abstract

When applied to hotels, the terms “facilities management” and “hotel management” are in many ways synonymous. Certainly effective management of the physical aspects in the hotel business is essential for maximum efficiency. This paper presents a research into facilities management operations in medium sized hotels (11‐50 rooms) in the UK. Medium sized hotels were selected for this research, since 90 per cent of UK hotels have fewer than 50 bedrooms. The key objective is to establish any trends that suggest a relationship between the application of facilities management techniques and the success of hotel businesses. Financial measures were not identified as being of critical importance and there seemed to be more of an interest in cost reduction than in income growth.

Details

Facilities, vol. 20 no. 7/8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-2772

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 December 2001

B.D. Ilozor, G.J. Treloar, P.O. Olomolaiye and M.I. Okoroh

Presents analytical findings of sick building situations in Sydney’s open‐plan offices. Aims to ascertain facilities managers’ perceptions of sick building impacts on…

1142

Abstract

Presents analytical findings of sick building situations in Sydney’s open‐plan offices. Aims to ascertain facilities managers’ perceptions of sick building impacts on discrete aspects of workspace management, with a view to raising general awareness. A total of 100 open‐plan offices in the Sydney CBD were studied, and collated data analysed using partial correlation. Significant associations were found between sick building syndrome and certain aspects. However, management control played moderating roles in some of the associations. Concludes that, with management control, sick building syndrome may be perceived as critical to only a limited workspace aspect. The implication is for sick building syndrome to be largely generalised as inconsequential to many aspects of work environment in Sydney, probably following the Hawthorne management ideology.

Details

Facilities, vol. 19 no. 13/14
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-2772

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 11 July 2008

Barry P. Haynes

The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the impact office layout has on office occupiers' productivity.

11794

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the impact office layout has on office occupiers' productivity.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper evaluates the literature that claims to make a linkage between the office layout and the effect on office occupiers' productivity. Two main themes are developed. First, the literature that links office layout to work patterns is evaluated, and second, the open‐plan office vs cellular office debate is developed.

Findings

The review of the literature reveals that the connection between the three major components of office layout, office occupiers' work patterns and productivity is not clearly established.

Originality/value

The paper establishes that there is a requirement to link together office layout to the work patterns of office occupiers. It is only when the connection is made between the office layout and the office occupiers' work patterns that productivity gains can be achieved. To support the different work patterns undertaken, the facilities manager can create office environments that consist of a balance between private space and communal shared space. The amount of balance will be very much dependent on the mix of the work patterns in the office.

Details

Journal of Facilities Management, vol. 6 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1472-5967

Keywords

1 – 10 of 91