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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1990

D. Wayne Taylor

Previous studies of business‐government relations have tended totake either a macro approach (using a single theoretical framework toexplain all business‐government…

Abstract

Previous studies of business‐government relations have tended to take either a macro approach (using a single theoretical framework to explain all business‐government relations) or a micro approach (one that fails to explain why business‐government relations have not improved over time). This article applies Lowi′s four‐part typology of policy types. In order to test the typology′s usefulness, a survey of business executives and government officials was carried out. The findings confirmed the thesis: business satisfaction with its relationship to government will be highest in the case of distributive policies, and decline to lowest in the case of constituent policies. A “meso‐level” theoretical framework is recommended to provide not only a better understanding of the multi‐levelled character of business‐government relations, but also future research with a practical orientation.

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International Journal of Public Sector Management, vol. 3 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-3558

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 1998

D. Wayne Taylor and Allan A. Warrack

Government’s continuum of policy instrument choices historically has included nationalization of enterprise. Today, the additional choice exists of the privatization of…

Abstract

Government’s continuum of policy instrument choices historically has included nationalization of enterprise. Today, the additional choice exists of the privatization of state enterprises. Canada is examined as a country in the process of switching from growing state enterprises (Crown corporation) to privatizing them. Although ideology, accountability, efficiency and/or financing were all reasons for creating state enterprise ‐ financing is the most prevalent driver of privatization.

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International Journal of Public Sector Management, vol. 11 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-3558

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 2000

D. Wayne Taylor

As in many countries today, health services across Canada are being restructured. Most jurisdictions within Canada are also restructuring and experimenting with the…

Abstract

As in many countries today, health services across Canada are being restructured. Most jurisdictions within Canada are also restructuring and experimenting with the governance function of health‐delivery organizations. However, much of this governance reorganization is being done in a vacuum. New governance models have appeared lately that defy the first principles of good corporate governance. Identifies and examines the nine principles of good organizational governance as well as the five benchmarks of excellence in governance. An example of a governance “monster” – one of the latest experiments in corporate leadership in Canadian health care – is also critiqued. Presents conclusions, lessons and warnings which all health‐services managers – indeed, all public sector managers – should heed.

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International Journal of Public Sector Management, vol. 13 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-3558

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 1994

D. Wayne Taylor and Faith Nesdoly

Using several frameworks for public policy analysis, documents howmidwifery in Ontario evolved from being illegal in 1982 to being aself‐regulated health profession in…

Abstract

Using several frameworks for public policy analysis, documents how midwifery in Ontario evolved from being illegal in 1982 to being a self‐regulated health profession in 1990. In 1985, the Ontario Government agreed that midwifery should be “legalized”; but how to do it was the question. The lobbying efforts of two coalitions armed with research‐based evidence influenced the policy decision process. Coalition A favoured midwifery becoming a self‐regulated health profession based on their beliefs that: (1) childbirth should be “de‐medicalized” and (2) the parents have a right to choose. Coalition B favoured the medical model and believed that “treatment was better”; it opposed home births, in general, and midwifery being self‐regulated, in particular. Also examines future implications of the Midwife Act.

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Health Manpower Management, vol. 20 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0955-2065

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Book part
Publication date: 13 August 2018

Robert L. Dipboye

Abstract

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The Emerald Review of Industrial and Organizational Psychology
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78743-786-9

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 2004

James H. Dulebohn, Brian Murray and Gerald R. Ferris

Interest in the nature of influence attempts in the performance evaluation process has increased in recent years. Researchers have conducted a number of important and…

Abstract

Interest in the nature of influence attempts in the performance evaluation process has increased in recent years. Researchers have conducted a number of important and revealing cross‐sectional investigations, but there remains virtually no longitudinal work in this area. The present study attempted to address this need by conducting a multi‐period investigation of influence tactics use and affect that addressed three questions: (1) Are individuals consistent in their use of influence tactics across evaluation periods? (2) Are prior‐period performance ratings reflected in subsequent influence tactic use? (3) What role does affect, both supervisor and subordinate, play in this process? A latent variable structural model was tested using longitudinal data from managers and employees of food services units. Our results indicated that there is a cycle of continued influence tactic use across time periods, performance ratings help to determine subsequent tactic use, and both supervisor and subordinate affect play a role in the influence‐evaluation process. Implications of these results and directions for future research are discussed.

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Organizational Analysis, vol. 12 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1551-7470

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Article
Publication date: 28 October 2010

Jenell L.S. Wittmer, James E. Martin and Amanuel G. Tekleab

This study extends previous literature on social exchange by investigating the mediating effects of leader‐member exchange on the relationship between procedural justice…

Abstract

This study extends previous literature on social exchange by investigating the mediating effects of leader‐member exchange on the relationship between procedural justice, job attitudes and turnover in a unionized setting. Past research has shown that procedural justice and subordinate/supervisor exchanges are related to job attitudes and turnover. These relationships have normally been studied in non‐union settings, in which union contextual variables are not considered. The current study uses hierarchical linear modeling to test theoretical models of these relationships in a unionized setting, where procedures and managerial treatment are more clearly defined and regulated. Results reveal that both procedural justice and leader‐member exchange are related to organizational commitment and job satisfaction and leader‐member exchange is related to actual turnover. Leadermember exchange partially mediates the relationship between procedural justice and these job attitudes after accounting for the effects of union commitment (at the individual level) and union‐management relations (at the store level). From a managerial perspective, our results emphasize the importance of proper selection, training and performance appraisal of supervisors, with treatment and support of employees as a main focus.

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American Journal of Business, vol. 25 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1935-5181

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Book part
Publication date: 24 July 2020

Wayne A. Hochwarter, Ilias Kapoutsis, Samantha L. Jordan, Abdul Karim Khan and Mayowa Babalola

Persistent change has placed considerable pressure on organizations to keep up or fade into obscurity. Firms that remain viable, or even thrive, are staffed with…

Abstract

Persistent change has placed considerable pressure on organizations to keep up or fade into obscurity. Firms that remain viable, or even thrive, are staffed with decision-makers who capably steer organizations toward opportunities and away from threats. Accordingly, leadership development has never been more critical. In this chapter, the authors propose that leader development is an inherently dyadic process initiated to communicate formal and informal expectations. The authors focus on the informal component, in the form of organizational politics, as an element of leadership that is critical to employee and company success. The authors advocate that superiors represent the most salient information source for leader development, especially as it relates to political dynamics embedded in work systems. The authors discuss research associated with our conceptualization of dyadic political leader development (DPLD). Specifically, the authors develop DPLD by exploring its conceptual underpinnings as they relate to sensemaking, identity, and social learning theories. Once established, the authors provide a refined discussion of the construct, illustrating its scholarly mechanisms that better explain leader development processes and outcomes. The authors then expand research in the areas of political skill, political will, political knowledge, and political phronesis by embedding our conceptualization of DPLD into a political leadership model. The authors conclude by discussing methodological issues and avenues of future research stemming from the development of DPLD.

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Research in Personnel and Human Resources Management
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80043-076-1

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2002

Barrie O. Pettman and Richard Dobbins

This issue is a selected bibliography covering the subject of leadership.

Abstract

This issue is a selected bibliography covering the subject of leadership.

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Equal Opportunities International, vol. 21 no. 4/5/6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0261-0159

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Book part
Publication date: 24 July 2020

Francis J. Yammarino, Minyoung Cheong, Jayoung Kim and Chou-Yu Tsai

For many of the current leadership theories, models, and approaches, the answer to the question posed in the title, “Is leadership more than ‘I like my boss’?,” is “no,”…

Abstract

For many of the current leadership theories, models, and approaches, the answer to the question posed in the title, “Is leadership more than ‘I like my boss’?,” is “no,” as there appears to be a hierarchy of leadership concepts with Liking of the leader as the primary dimension or general factor foundation. There are then secondary dimensions or specific sub-factors of liking of Relationship Leadership and Task Leadership; and subsequently, tertiary dimensions or actual sub-sub-factors that comprise the numerous leadership views as well as their operationalizations (e.g., via surveys). There are, however, some leadership views that go beyond simply liking of the leader and liking of relationship leadership and task leadership. For these, which involve explicit levels of analysis formulations, often beyond the leader, or are multi-level in nature, the answer to the title question is “yes.” We clarify and discuss these various “no” and “yes” leadership views and implications of our work for future research and personnel and human resources management practice.

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Research in Personnel and Human Resources Management
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80043-076-1

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