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Book part
Publication date: 2 December 2016

Joo-Young Park and Dong-One Kim

This paper examines the role of cultural values measured as collectivism, face-saving, and conflict-avoidance, in predicting employee voice behavior. Using data (n = 198…

Abstract

This paper examines the role of cultural values measured as collectivism, face-saving, and conflict-avoidance, in predicting employee voice behavior. Using data (n = 198) collected from automotive-industry employees in the United States (US) and Korea, several interesting findings emerged. First, and most notably, for a “leaver” who chooses the exit option, culture does not matter, such that none of the three cultural values have a significant association with the exit option across countries. Second, for a “stayer,” who chooses the voice, loyalty, or neglect option, culture does matter in that cultural-specific values, such as collectivism, face-saving, and conflict-avoidance were found to affect employees nonexit options in the Korean sample, but not in the U.S. sample. The results of this study suggest that these three cultural values guide and predict employee voice behavior. Additionally, the results of this study confirm that job alternatives are a significant predictor of the exit option across cultures. This study therefore presents strong empirical evidence of the effect of culture on employee voice behavior and increases our understanding of employee voice behavior across cultures.

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Employee Voice in Emerging Economies
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-240-8

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Book part
Publication date: 5 June 2018

Emily C. Bouck and Erin Bone

This chapter reviews the intervention research literature – particularly interventions deemed evidence-based – for students with intellectual disability across academic…

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This chapter reviews the intervention research literature – particularly interventions deemed evidence-based – for students with intellectual disability across academic and life-skills instruction. Although the focus of this chapter is the spectrum of students covered under the term “intellectual disability,” the majority of research on evidence-based interventions for students with intellectual disability focus on students with more moderate and severe intellectual disability, rather than students with mild intellectual disability. The majority of the interventions determined to be evidence-based within the literature for students with intellectual disability – across both academic and life skills – tend to be those that fall within the purview of systematic instruction.

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Viewpoints on Interventions for Learners with Disabilities
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78743-089-1

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1999

Maurice E. Schweitzer and Rachel Croson

This paper investigates the use of deception in two negotiation studies. Study 1 (N = 80) demonstrates that direct questions and solidarity curtail deception. Study 2 (N …

Abstract

This paper investigates the use of deception in two negotiation studies. Study 1 (N = 80) demonstrates that direct questions and solidarity curtail deception. Study 2 (N = 74 dyads) demonstrates that direct questions are particularly effective in curtailing lies of omission, but may actually increase the incidence of lies of commission. These findings highlight the importance of misrepresentation to the negotiation process and suggest approaches for contending with deception.

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International Journal of Conflict Management, vol. 10 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1044-4068

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 1999

Reynold Macpherson

There is a widely accepted myth in New Zealand that the Elam School of Fine Arts in the University of Auckland is an organised anarchy, internally divided and…

Abstract

There is a widely accepted myth in New Zealand that the Elam School of Fine Arts in the University of Auckland is an organised anarchy, internally divided and cantankerously unbiddable, and further, that this is largely inevitable given the nature of artists and designers. Its unique culture, however, is shown in this paper to have been generated and reinforced over decades by the exigencies of environment, partitioned and media‐based curricular structures, intense and volatile relationships, and, occasionally, inappropriate leadership services. Despite this history, Elam has sustained a major role in shaping New Zealand’s cultural identity, and continues to produce some of the country’s most outstanding visual artists and designers. The paradox involved is partially explained by persistent evidence of self‐managing teams, creative problem‐solving, and independent excellence, that suggest deep and plural commitments to a virtue ethic.

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International Journal of Educational Management, vol. 13 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-354X

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1990

K. Swann and W.D. O′Keefe

This article is the second half of a series concerningadvanced decisions. Central to the problem of AMT(advanced manufacturing technology) is thatinvestment is…

Abstract

This article is the second half of a series concerning advanced decisions. Central to the problem of AMT (advanced manufacturing technology) is that investment is uncertainty. Under consideration is a highly expensive innovation, often bringing unprecedented operational routines and organisational impacts. The intangible benefits of AMT are dealt with here, and how to quantify them.

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Management Decision, vol. 28 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

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Book part
Publication date: 19 November 2020

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The Impact of Global Drug Policy on Women: Shifting the Needle
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83982-885-0

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Book part
Publication date: 28 August 2020

Massimiliano M. Pellegrini, Andrea Caputo, Cristiano Ciappei and Léo-Paul Dana

This chapter analyzes how entrepreneurs of a same district, thus dealing with similar sets of resources and accesses to market, respond to innovation pressure. Spread over…

Abstract

This chapter analyzes how entrepreneurs of a same district, thus dealing with similar sets of resources and accesses to market, respond to innovation pressure. Spread over five-year period from 2010 to 2014, this is a longitudinal qualitative multiple case studies conducted in Italy’s Prato textile district, near Florence. The authors adopted a content analysis to reconstruct the perceptions about innovation trajectories adopted by a sample of entrepreneurs. Our findings show that despite equal pre-conditions, we observe firms evolving differently due to their approach to pursing opportunities, based on network configurations and cognitive interpretations of internal support for implementation. This chapter develops an interpretation of the findings adopting a framework based on the effect of strong and weak ties and a cognitive approach based on an effectual or causal entrepreneurial decision-making.

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The Entrepreneurial Behaviour: Unveiling the cognitive and emotional aspect of entrepreneurship
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78973-508-6

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1998

Tony Simons and David L. Corsun

The World of Concrete trade show organizers negotiate a block of approximately 30,000 rooms with a different location each year. The case was developed through interviews…

Abstract

The World of Concrete trade show organizers negotiate a block of approximately 30,000 rooms with a different location each year. The case was developed through interviews with the trade show director. The issues under negotiation include the room rate, cancellation clauses, and amenities for the conference organizers and VIPs. The case is written for a negotiations course and may be used in two ways: as an intermediate exercise for refining student skills at information management and integrative bargaining or as a fairly advanced exercise about appropriate preparation for major negotiations.

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International Journal of Conflict Management, vol. 9 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1044-4068

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Book part
Publication date: 12 November 2018

Tina L. Margolis, Julie Lauren Rones and Ariela Algaze

Films focusing on girls and women with anorexia have not found major producers and distributors in Hollywood, yet movies on subjects such as suicidality and bipolar…

Abstract

Films focusing on girls and women with anorexia have not found major producers and distributors in Hollywood, yet movies on subjects such as suicidality and bipolar disorder have been showcased. Eating disorders affect approximately 30 million people in the United States alone, and it has the highest mortality rate of any mental illness, so this invisibility seems incongruous. The authors theorize that Hollywood avoids this subject because of ontological anxiety. Movie plots are schemas and young females are inextricably associated with fertility and futurity. An anorexic’s appearance contradicts and nullifies this symbolic role because anorexia often leads to infertility and death. Psychological studies and philosophical arguments claim that a belief in an afterlife and the regeneration of humankind create coherence and meaning for individuals. An anorexic’s appearance and behavior represent images of self-destruction – images that inflame the viewer’s unconscious and primordial fears about the annihilation of the species. By avoiding the topic of anorexia, Hollywood defends against its symbolic fears of mortality but diminishes the importance of the subject through its absence; it ignores its place in women’s social history and erases its place in American history. Because of Hollywood’s social reach and because greater visibility is correlated with a reduction in stigma, the authors conjecture that a film on this subject would inspire necessary attention to women’s roles, public mores, public policies, and the social good.

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Gender and the Media: Women’s Places
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78754-329-4

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Article
Publication date: 1 July 2008

Filipe Sobral, Eugenio Carvalhal and Filipe Almeida

Culture profoundly influences how people think, communicate, and behave. Successful cross‐cultural negotiations require an understanding of the negotiation style of those…

Abstract

Culture profoundly influences how people think, communicate, and behave. Successful cross‐cultural negotiations require an understanding of the negotiation style of those on the other side of the table, and the acceptance and respect of their cultural beliefs and norms. The focus of this paper is to identify the styles of negotiation that tend to be adopted by Brazilian negotiators. Participants were 683 experienced negotiators from 22 Brazilian states. The Brazilian style of negotiation is described based on seven culturally sensitive dimensions that are present in negotiations: the nature of the activity, the role of the individual, uncertainty and time, communication, trust, protocol, and outcomes.

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Management Research: Journal of the Iberoamerican Academy of Management, vol. 6 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1536-5433

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