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Article
Publication date: 27 August 2020

Mariangela Zanni, Kirti Ruikar and Robby Soetanto

Sustainability considerations are often treated as an add-on to building design, following ad-hoc processes for their implementation. The purpose of this study was to…

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247

Abstract

Purpose

Sustainability considerations are often treated as an add-on to building design, following ad-hoc processes for their implementation. The purpose of this study was to investigate, model and facilitate the early stages of building information modelling (BIM) enabled sustainable building design (SBD) by formalising the ad-hoc working relationships of the best practices in order to standardise the optimal collaboration workflows.

Design/methodology/approach

Four stages of data collection were conducted, including a total of 32 semi-structured interviews with industry experts from 17 organisations. Fourteen “best practice” case studies were identified, and roles and responsibilities, resources, information exchanges, interdependencies, timing and sequence of events and critical decisions were examined.

Findings

The research classified the critical components of SBD into a framework utilising content and thematic analyses. These components were coordinated explicitly into a systematic process, which followed concurrent engineering (CE) principles utilising Integrated DEFinition (IDEF) 3 structured diagramming technique. Then, Green BIM Box (GBB) workflow management prototype tool was developed to analyse communication and delivery of BIM-enabled SBD in a centralised system.

Originality/value

This study represents an improvement to previous attempts to systematically define the BIM-enabled SBD process for the early stages. The results support the idea that a transparent SBD process, which follows specified communication patterns, can assist in achieving sustainability efficiently in terms of time, cost and effort.

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 20 March 2017

Tristan Gerrish, Kirti Ruikar, Malcolm Cook, Mark Johnson and Mark Phillip

The purpose of this paper is to present a review of the implications building information modelling (BIM) is having on the building energy modelling (BEM) and design of…

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7726

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to present a review of the implications building information modelling (BIM) is having on the building energy modelling (BEM) and design of buildings. It addresses the issues surrounding exchange of information throughout the design process, and where BIM may be useful in contributing to effective design progression and information availability.

Design/methodology/approach

Through review of current design procedures and examination of the concurrency between architectural and thermophysical design modelling, a procedure for information generation relevant to design stakeholders is created, and applied to a high-performance building project currently under development.

Findings

The extents of information key to the successful design of a buildings energy performance in relation to its architectural objectives are given, with indication of the level of development required at each stage of the design process.

Practical implications

BIM offers an extensible medium for parametric information storage, and its implementation in design development offers the capability to include BEM parameter-integrated construction information. The extent of information required for accurate BEM at stages of a building’s design is key to understanding how best to record performance information in a BIM environment.

Originality/value

This paper contributes to the discussion around the integration of concurrent design procedures and a common data environment. It presents a framework for the creation and dissemination of information during design, exemplifies this on a real building project and evaluates the barriers experienced in successful implementation.

Details

Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management, vol. 24 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-9988

Keywords

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 3 October 2017

Tristan Gerrish, Kirti Ruikar, Malcolm Cook, Mark Johnson and Mark Phillip

The aim of this paper is to demonstrate the use of historical building performance data to identify potential issues with the build quality and operation of a building, as…

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2289

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this paper is to demonstrate the use of historical building performance data to identify potential issues with the build quality and operation of a building, as a means of narrowing the scope of in-depth further review.

Design/methodology/approach

The response of a room to the difference between internal and external temperatures is used to demonstrate patterns in thermal response across monitored rooms in a single building, to clearly show where rooms are under-performing in terms of their ability to retain heat during unconditioned hours. This procedure is applied to three buildings of different types, identifying the scope and limitation of this method and indicating areas of building performance deficiency.

Findings

The response of a single space to changing internal and external temperatures can be used to determine whether it responds differently to other monitored buildings. Spaces where thermal bridging and changes in use from design were encountered exhibit noticeably different responses.

Research limitations/implications

Application of this methodology is limited to buildings where temperature monitoring is undertaken both internally for a variety of spaces, and externally, and where knowledge of the uses of monitored spaces is available. Naturally ventilated buildings would be more suitable for analysis using this method.

Originality/value

This paper contributes to the understanding of building energy performance from a data-driven perspective, to the knowledge on the disparity between building design intent and reality, and to the use of basic commonly recorded performance metrics for analysis of potentially detrimental building performance issues.

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 11 May 2017

Rizwana Shaheen Hussain, Kirti Ruikar, Marcus P. Enoch, Nigel Brien and David Gartside

Diminishing local government budgets and the need to reduce highway works activities necessitate cost effective and efficient processes. The purpose of this paper is to…

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4884

Abstract

Purpose

Diminishing local government budgets and the need to reduce highway works activities necessitate cost effective and efficient processes. The purpose of this paper is to investigate streamlining road works administrative processes to enhance coordinated working at Derby City Council.

Design/methodology/approach

Case study research of a local authority was undertaken using business process mapping. Specifically, Swimlane analysis enabled re-engineering of business processes from design stage, to works permit issuance. Process improvement recommendations were validated by nine industry experts through a focus group and semi-structured interviews. A logic map was developed for transferability to other councils, identifying key attributes for a successful administrative road works management process.

Findings

Research revealed inherent silo working and processes built around fragmented IT systems creating process inefficiency. Validation found numerous practices and management styles were culturally embedded and common across councils. Peer reviewed recommendations are made to improve working practices, including improving IT systems, removing process bottlenecks, and training staff.

Research limitations/implications

Whilst road works management policy is generally under-researched, its strategic and negative impacts are widely acknowledged. This study highlights the day-to-day operational problems which are interconnected to the strategic impact, bridging an important gap in knowledge, as well as adding to business process re-engineering literature.

Originality/value

The research adds to a limited body of road works management policy research, and also presents a high-level logic map for councils to adopt as appropriate.

Details

Built Environment Project and Asset Management, vol. 7 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2044-124X

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 4 May 2010

J.R. Henderson and K. Ruikar

This paper aims to present an overview of the findings of a study aimed at investigating industry‐specific factors that influence the success of technology implementation…

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3139

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to present an overview of the findings of a study aimed at investigating industry‐specific factors that influence the success of technology implementation in construction organisations. These include: the identification of a need, proposal procedures, benefit identification/evaluation, formulation of implementation strategies, implementation barriers, change management and overall implementation evaluation.

Design/methodology/approach

A semi‐structured interview‐based approach is adopted to identify the industry‐specific factors that influence the success of technology implementation in construction organisations. The findings are discussed and recommendations to industry for potential improvements are given.

Findings

The extent to which successful technology implementation can be achieved, ultimately depends on the degree to which changes are planned, managed and evaluated. Therefore, technology implementation within construction organisations is not so much a technological problem as it is a human behavioural one.

Practical implications

As technology implementation ultimately consists of changes in practices being made, the fundamental issues regarding technology implementation strategies are well aligned with those of change management. As a result, it is vital that human behavioural and emotional issues are addressed if successful technology implementation is to be achieved.

Originality/value

An investigation into the industry‐specific factors which have resulted in the perception that the construction industry is lagging behind other industries in the uptake of new technologies.

Details

Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management, vol. 17 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-9988

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 26 April 2013

James R. Henderson, Kirti D. Ruikar and Andrew R.J. Dainty

The purpose of this paper is to report the empirical findings of a survey aimed to investigate the need to improve cross‐phase learning between design and construction…

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1973

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to report the empirical findings of a survey aimed to investigate the need to improve cross‐phase learning between design and construction. Through exploring the need to introduce a design‐construction feedback loop, combined with the barriers against its development, an expansion of knowledge surrounding the deficiencies of current practice is provided.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper reports the results from an online survey conducted in spring 2011 targeted at experienced personnel in the planning, design, construction and facilities management phases of healthcare infrastructure projects.

Findings

The current approach of detecting and correcting errors is significantly hindering the extent to which learning from previous experiences is taking place. It is shown that improved integration between design and construction is required in the form of improved feedback if continuous improvement in the areas of efficiency, quality, value and general learning from previous experiences/projects is to be achieved.

Research limitations/implications

The focused population of this study limits the extent to which the findings can be generalised. However, it is viewed that this context is potentially one of the most complex and unique project participant arrangements to overcome. Therefore if the need and ability to share learning outcomes across such a complex arrangement can be achieved, then it may be easier within traditional arrangements.

Practical implications

The practical implications of moving away from single‐loop learning towards a double‐loop learning approach are provided.

Originality/value

This paper identifies that there is a distinct need for further efforts to be applied in the area of improving feedback between the phases of design and construction.

Details

Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management, vol. 20 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-9988

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 7 January 2014

Mesut Pala, Francis Edum-Fotwe, Kirti Ruikar, Nathan Doughty and Chris Peters

The purpose of this paper is to examine how contractor firms manage their relationships with extended supply chain tiers and investigate the range of ICT technologies used…

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3210

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine how contractor firms manage their relationships with extended supply chain tiers and investigate the range of ICT technologies used to facilitate such practices.

Design/methodology/approach

An on-line questionnaire survey was conducted to gather information about supply chain management operations, supplier relationship management and the ICT technologies used by contractor firms to manage their extended supply chain tiers.

Findings

The extended supply chain relationships of contractor firms are primarily composed of contractual, technical and financial entities, but findings suggest that the vision to consider extended supply chain firms when selecting suppliers are still myopic. Majority of ICT technologies are used between Tier 1 supply chain firms and there is an inconsistency in the number of technologies adopted with the extended supply chain tiers. Despite having a high involvement relationship with Tier 2 downstream firms, findings indicate a lack of use of ICT technologies to manage the organisational, personal and technological interactions with these firms.

Research limitations/implications

On the basis of different relationship types this study develops an initial framework for management of supply chains that are facilitated by relevant ICT technologies.

Originality/value

This paper provides insights into the management of extended supply chain firms by contractor firms from a relationship-centric perspective and develops an initial framework for relationship-centric supply chain management.

Details

Supply Chain Management: An International Journal, vol. 19 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-8546

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 23 October 2007

D. Ruikar, C.J. Anumba, A. Duke, P.M. Carrillo and N.M. Bouchlaghem

This paper has the purpose of exploring the use of the semantic web to support project information management. It aims to discuss the development of a semantic web based…

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3464

Abstract

Purpose

This paper has the purpose of exploring the use of the semantic web to support project information management. It aims to discuss the development of a semantic web based framework for shared definitions of terms, resources and relationships within a construction project. These can be used to help and support intelligent collaboration.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper explores the scope of using the semantic web to manage information management processes in the construction industry. It develops the hypothesis that information can be managed using appropriate tools and techniques and develops a roadmap that shows the way in which a solution can be achieved.

Findings

The discussion provides information on the technology that can be used to manage construction project information and the development of ontology is provided in detail.

Originality/value

The paper makes an original contribution of exploring an area (information management tools and techniques) that is at the forefront of discussion in academe and industry in the UK.

Details

Facilities, vol. 25 no. 13/14
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-2772

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 9 October 2009

Kirti Ruikar, Lauri Koskela and Martin Sexton

At the heart of knowledge management (KM) are the people – an organisation's important knowledge asset. Although this is widely acknowledged, businesses seldom understand…

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1371

Abstract

Purpose

At the heart of knowledge management (KM) are the people – an organisation's important knowledge asset. Although this is widely acknowledged, businesses seldom understand this axiom in terms of the communities through which individuals develop and share the capacity to create and use knowledge. It is the collective learning that takes place within the social systems, i.e. communities of practice (CoP) that are of particular significance to an organisation from a KM perspective. This paper aims to review, critique, and raise some pertinent questions on the role of CoPs; and with the help of case studies shed light on the “goings‐on” in construction practices.

Design/methodology/approach

After critically reviewing the literature on CoPs and querying some underlying assertions, this research investigates how these issues are addressed in practice. A case study approach is adopted. Three organisations operating in the construction sector are interviewed for the purpose of this paper.

Findings

Case study findings highlight the potential challenges and benefits of CoPs to a construction organisation, the role they play in generating and delivering value to the organisation and their contribution towards the collective organisational intelligence. From the findings, it is clear that the question is not whether communities exist within organisations, but how they deliver value to the organisation. From an organisational perspective, the key challenge is to provide an environment that is conducive to developing and nurturing such communities as opposed to merely creating them.

Practical implications

Challenges and benefits demonstrated through the case studies should be taken in context. The findings are not intended to be prescriptive in nature, but are intentionally descriptive to provide contextual data that allow readers to draw their own inferences in the context of their organisations. They should be applied taking into account an organisation's unique characteristics and differentiators, the dynamics of the environment in which it operates and the culture it harbours within.

Originality/value

Investigating the role of CoPs in the context of case study construction organisations forms the prime focus of this paper.

Details

Construction Innovation, vol. 9 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1471-4175

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 28 December 2021

Sonali Alankarage, Nicholas Chileshe, Raufdeen Rameezdeen, David J. Edwards and Aparna Samaraweera

Building information modelling (BIM) has had a considerable impact on the socio-technical aspects of construction organisations. Culture has been considered an essential…

Abstract

Purpose

Building information modelling (BIM) has had a considerable impact on the socio-technical aspects of construction organisations. Culture has been considered an essential element in BIM practice. Hence, this paper aims to explore existing research relates to culture in the BIM context.

Design/methodology/approach

A systematic literature review (SLR) was conducted based on the PRISMA guidelines using 104 articles published between 2011 and 2020 and directed with a descriptive and content analysis.

Findings

The SLR results give evidence that culture in the BIM context is still an under-researched topic. Culture has been considered as both a dependent and independent factor in the BIM domain. Organisational BIM culture is a collection of fundamental beliefs established in a BIM using organisation and passed to new employees with the use of BIM. BIM using organisations are have either weak or strong BIM cultures. Proper analysis and understanding of the BIM culture of different organisations are necessary to realise the strategies of transformation from a weak BIM culture to a strong BIM culture.

Originality/value

To the best of the author's knowledge, this is the first SLR in BIM research that investigates the role of culture in the BIM setting. This study contributed to the existing body of knowledge by proposing a conceptual framework to understand and change a weak BIM culture of an organisation to a strong, matured BIM culture. This SLR serves as a future research basis in BIM-triggered culture.

Details

Construction Innovation , vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1471-4175

Keywords

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