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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2001

D. Jane Bower, John Hinks, Howard Wright, Cliff Hardcastle and Heather Cuckow

The paper discusses the potential impact of videoconferencing on practices and processes within the construction industry, based on analyses carried out on its use and…

Abstract

The paper discusses the potential impact of videoconferencing on practices and processes within the construction industry, based on analyses carried out on its use and impact in the healthcare sector – which like construction involves technology‐intensive processes which are dependent upon cross‐professional and cross‐disciplinary relationships and communications, operate within an increasingly regulatory and litigious climate, and involve organizationally fluid, virtual, teams spanning several subindustries. Recently published research evidence from the healthcare sector suggests that whilst videoconferencing and other advanced information and communication technologies (ICTs) have pervasive capabilities, successes in their application may be shortlived and modest in achievement. In use, their actual uptake and application have been found to be fundamentally affected by a range of social and operational issues, such as fears over a new formalization and trackability of previously informal conversations; a rebalancing of power relationships (between professionals using the ICTs as well as between doctor and patient); pressures on social/cultural and procedural alignment between participants; and personal and corporate attitudes to the technologies (including simply disliking the ICT). There is also evidence from the healthcare sector to suggest that ICTs increase the complexity of the delivering healthcare, and that the limitations of the technologies emphasise an existing dependency of communications and processes on tacit knowledge which is not readily formalized for communication via ICTs. However, the paper also notes an increasing pressure on the construction industry to respond to the globalizing potential that ICTs offer for the supply and delivery of knowledge‐based services, and discusses the implications of the issues found in the healthcare sector for the use and potential abuse of ICTs in the construction industry that will have to be successfully addressed in order to avoid ICTs being perceived as threatening and to allow their use to help organizations address the globalising marketplace.

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Article
Publication date: 1 July 1994

D. Jane Bower

This study examined te impact of the changing structural and regulatory environment on the process of biomedical innovation management within the NHS.

Abstract

This study examined te impact of the changing structural and regulatory environment on the process of biomedical innovation management within the NHS.

Details

Management Research News, vol. 17 no. 7/8/9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0140-9174

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 1994

D. Jane Bower

Essential parts of the R&D in virtually all UK biomedical innovations areexecuted within teaching hospitals, which are undergoing majororganizational changes as part of…

Abstract

Essential parts of the R&D in virtually all UK biomedical innovations are executed within teaching hospitals, which are undergoing major organizational changes as part of the ongoing NHS reforms. Examines the impact of the changing structural and regulatory environment on the process of biomedical innovation management of two groups of technologically novel projects within the NHS. Finds that regulatory changes were tending to centralize and formalize innovation management, but that end users were playing an active role in directing the course of new treatment development. Problems of allocation of R&D resources within teaching hospitals were still unresolved, although some evidence from the London teaching hospitals suggested that hospital managers were able to deal with conflicting demands where they perceived that research excellence could be an asset rather than a cost.

Details

Journal of Management in Medicine, vol. 8 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-9235

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1994

Daniel Hanne and Martin Zeller

The process by which technological innovations developed in one institution are discovered, acquired, and adapted for use by another institution.

Abstract

The process by which technological innovations developed in one institution are discovered, acquired, and adapted for use by another institution.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 22 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 2008

Jane Briddon, Clare Baguley and Martin Webber

This paper highlights the social context of common mental disorders in primary care and the paucity of evidence relating to effective social interventions. It introduces…

Abstract

This paper highlights the social context of common mental disorders in primary care and the paucity of evidence relating to effective social interventions. It introduces the ABC‐E Model of Emotion, which combines social interventions with psychological therapy, and discusses how the implementation of the new role of graduate primary care mental health worker (GPCMHW) provides an opportunity for holistic practice in helping individuals experiencing mild to moderate mental health difficulties in primary care. It provides a case example of the implementation of the ABC‐E model and makes recommendations for further research including the evaluation of the model and GPCMHW training programmes.

Details

The Journal of Mental Health Training, Education and Practice, vol. 3 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-6228

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 31 March 1997

Robert Caves and Geoffrey Gosling

Abstract

Details

Strategic Airport Planning
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-58-547441-0

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1980

Not many weeks back, according to newspaper reports, three members of the library staff of the School of Slavonic and East European Studies in London were dismissed. All…

Abstract

Not many weeks back, according to newspaper reports, three members of the library staff of the School of Slavonic and East European Studies in London were dismissed. All had refused to carry out issue desk duty. All, according to the newspaper account, were members of ASTMS. None, according to the Library Association yearbook, was a member of the appropriate professional organisation for librarians in Great Britain.

Details

Library Review, vol. 29 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0024-2535

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Article
Publication date: 4 January 2017

Sjur Børve, Tuomas Ahola, Bjorn Andersen and Wenche Aarseth

The purpose of this paper is to evaluate to which extent partnering practices observed in earlier research focussing on the construction industry are applied in offshore…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to evaluate to which extent partnering practices observed in earlier research focussing on the construction industry are applied in offshore development drilling projects.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper reviews earlier research on project partnering and the relationship-based procurement (RBP) taxonomy. The taxonomy is then empirically applied to describe partnering practices in an incentive-based drilling project in Norway.

Findings

Many elements of project partnering observed earlier in construction projects were found to characterize offshore development drilling projects. However, as assessed using the RBP framework, the authors found that partnering elements in observed context rated consistently lower than elements previously reported in the construction industry, indicating a lower maturity of partnering practices in the studied context.

Practical implications

The present study provides a multi-dimensional and systematic description of partnering practices in offshore drilling projects. Project owners can utilize this information to identify partnering elements requiring particular emphasis when initiating and managing drilling projects. Based on the findings, such elements include transparency and open-book auditing, integrated risk mitigation and insurance practices and establishment of authentic leadership. The findings further imply that partnering models cannot be directly applied across industry boundaries but must be tailored to fit the salient characteristics of each context.

Originality/value

The paper systematically describes to which extent specific partnering elements of the RBP taxonomy are applied in offshore drilling projects.

Details

International Journal of Managing Projects in Business, vol. 10 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8378

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1974

Frances Neel Cheney

Communications regarding this column should be addressed to Mrs. Cheney, Peabody Library School, Nashville, Tenn. 37203. Mrs. Cheney does not sell the books listed here…

Abstract

Communications regarding this column should be addressed to Mrs. Cheney, Peabody Library School, Nashville, Tenn. 37203. Mrs. Cheney does not sell the books listed here. They are available through normal trade sources. Mrs. Cheney, being a member of the editorial board of Pierian Press, will not review Pierian Press reference books in this column. Descriptions of Pierian Press reference books will be included elsewhere in this publication.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 2 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

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Book part
Publication date: 10 April 2019

Jane K. Lê and Torsten Schmid

While qualitative work has a long tradition in the strategy field and has recently regained popularity, we have not paused to take stock of how such work offers…

Abstract

While qualitative work has a long tradition in the strategy field and has recently regained popularity, we have not paused to take stock of how such work offers contributions. We address this oversight with a review of qualitative studies of strategy published in five top-tier journals over an extended period of 15 years (2003–2017). In an attempt to organize the field, we develop an empirically grounded organizing framework. We identify 12 designs that are evident in the literature, or “designs-in-use” as we call them. Acknowledging important similarities and differences between the various approaches to qualitative strategy research (QSR), we group these designs into three “families” based on their philosophical orientation. We use these designs and families to identify trends in QSR. We then engage those trends to orient the future development of qualitative methods in the strategy field.

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