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Book part
Publication date: 12 August 2009

Daryl M. Guffey, D. David McIntyre and Jeffrey J. McMillan

We examine the influence of two treatments on students’ perceptions of earnings management. We find that student reading assignments on earnings management and…

Abstract

We examine the influence of two treatments on students’ perceptions of earnings management. We find that student reading assignments on earnings management and professionalism topics followed by individual testing do not alter student-reported beliefs. However, when the same students process and report their beliefs about earnings management practices in a group setting, the results are different from their initially reported individual beliefs. These statistically significant results suggest that a group dynamic that involves students in the learning process, may be effective in influencing the ethical judgments and perceptions of our future business professionals.

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Advances in Accounting Education
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84855-882-3

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Book part
Publication date: 12 August 2009

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Advances in Accounting Education
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84855-882-3

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1985

David Knights and John Moore

Since individual and/or sectional interests are embedded in organisational relations, the meaning and significance of manpower plans will depend very much on the political…

Abstract

Since individual and/or sectional interests are embedded in organisational relations, the meaning and significance of manpower plans will depend very much on the political and career systems of which they are both a condition and a consequence. Manpower planning can never be seen simply as a technical solution to practical problems for insofar as it reflects and reinforces power‐knowledge practices within organisations, it is as much part of the problem as of the solution. The post‐Griffith climate of industrial management in the NHS is leading to the imposition of an artificial consensus through bureaucratic and technicist means, rather than identifying and developing new ways to mobilise the creative collective power of the majority, who at present remain peripheral to, and disinterested in, their organisation.

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International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy, vol. 5 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-333X

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Book part
Publication date: 17 December 2015

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Knowing, Becoming, doing as Teacher Educators: Identity, Intimate Scholarship, Inquiry
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78441-140-4

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Book part
Publication date: 17 December 2015

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Knowing, Becoming, doing as Teacher Educators: Identity, Intimate Scholarship, Inquiry
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78441-140-4

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Book part
Publication date: 17 December 2015

Abstract

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Knowing, Becoming, Doing as Teacher Educators: Identity, Intimate Scholarship, Inquiry
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78441-140-4

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 17 December 2015

Abstract

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Knowing, Becoming, Doing as Teacher Educators: Identity, Intimate Scholarship, Inquiry
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78441-140-4

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Book part
Publication date: 4 June 2021

Briony Anderson and Mark A. Wood

This chapter examines the phenomenon of doxxing: the practice of publishing private, proprietary, or personally identifying information on the internet, usually with…

Abstract

This chapter examines the phenomenon of doxxing: the practice of publishing private, proprietary, or personally identifying information on the internet, usually with malicious intent. Undertaking a scoping review of research into doxxing, we develop a typology of this form of technology-facilitated violence (TFV) that expands understandings of doxxing, its forms and its harms, beyond a taciturn discussion of privacy and harassment online. Building on David M. Douglas's typology of doxxing, our typology considers two key dimensions of doxxing: the form of loss experienced by the victim and the perpetrator's motivation(s) for undertaking this form of TFV. Through examining the extant literature on doxxing, we identify seven mutually non-exclusive motivations for this form of TFV: extortion, silencing, retribution, controlling, reputation-building, unintentional, and doxxing in the public interest. We conclude by identifying future areas for interdisciplinary research into doxxing that brings criminology into conversation with the insights of media-focused disciplines.

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The Emerald International Handbook of Technology-Facilitated Violence and Abuse
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83982-849-2

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Article
Publication date: 12 February 2018

Heather Skinner, David Sarpong and Gareth R.T. White

The purpose of this paper is to present a conceptual framework based on an understanding of the principles of popular mobile-enabled games, indicating how organisations in…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to present a conceptual framework based on an understanding of the principles of popular mobile-enabled games, indicating how organisations in the tourism sector could meet the needs of Millennials and Generation Z through engaging with the existing gamified location-based practice of geocaching as an information and communication technology enabled gamified enhancement to the destination experience.

Design/methodology/approach

As a primarily conceptual paper, the authors take an inductive qualitative approach to theory building based on the understanding of an existing practice (geocaching) that is undertaken among a community of practitioners (geocachers), which results in the presentation of a conceptual framework, which is the theory itself that the authors have constructed from the understanding of what is going on and which principles can then be applied across other tourism practices.

Findings

Findings indicate that through engaging with geocaching, smaller entrepreneurial businesses even in non-urban destinations that fall outside of the remit of smart city developments, and in tourism destinations on the less technologically enabled or resource-rich side of the digital divide, can reap the benefits associated with employing the principles and practices associated with smart tourism to meet the needs of this new generation of tourism consumers who seek richer digital and often gamified tourism experiences.

Originality/value

This paper fills a gap in the literature regarding the way many different types of tourism destinations could meet the needs of Millennials and Generation Z tourists.

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Journal of Tourism Futures, vol. 4 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2055-5911

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Article
Publication date: 30 August 2021

David W. Atkinson

Much has been written about the crisis in the Humanities even as student interest in the Humanities continues to decline. In the so-called “post-truth,” “post-COVID19”…

Abstract

Purpose

Much has been written about the crisis in the Humanities even as student interest in the Humanities continues to decline. In the so-called “post-truth,” “post-COVID19” period,” however, the Humanities deserve attention for the important role they must play in preparing students for the world during a period of dramatic change.

Design/methodology/approach

Discussion focuses on the “post-truth” period and how the Humanities have a role in confronting misinformation and “fake news.” It provides specific actions for how those in the Humanities might address the current situation. It relies on the author’s considerable background as a university Dean and President over a period of over 40 years and draws on a variety of written material addressing the future of the Humanities.

Findings

In a period when the world confronts unprecedented change, when misinformation is confused with the truth and when social media exercises so much influence, students more than ever need the insight and context of the Humanities to mitigate the cant, bogus claims and questionable ethics that so much shape the world. Responsibility falls to faculty as they must make clear to their students how the Humanities provide a perspective that allows students to work through the big questions of their time.

Research limitations/implications

Much has been written about the challenges facing the Humanities. It is hoped that this paper will generate additional discussion on how the Humanities might assert themselves during what are troubling times in higher education.

Originality/value

The author’s long experience as a senior university administrator provides a perspective that faculty and administrators might find useful as they consider the future of the Humanities at their institutions.

Details

On the Horizon , vol. 29 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1074-8121

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