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Book part
Publication date: 10 December 2015

Chun Kit Lok

Smart card-based E-payment systems are receiving increasing attention as the number of implementations is witnessed on the rise globally. Understanding of user adoption…

Abstract

Smart card-based E-payment systems are receiving increasing attention as the number of implementations is witnessed on the rise globally. Understanding of user adoption behavior of E-payment systems that employ smart card technology becomes a research area that is of particular value and interest to both IS researchers and professionals. However, research interest focuses mostly on why a smart card-based E-payment system results in a failure or how the system could have grown into a success. This signals the fact that researchers have not had much opportunity to critically review a smart card-based E-payment system that has gained wide support and overcome the hurdle of critical mass adoption. The Octopus in Hong Kong has provided a rare opportunity for investigating smart card-based E-payment system because of its unprecedented success. This research seeks to thoroughly analyze the Octopus from technology adoption behavior perspectives.

Cultural impacts on adoption behavior are one of the key areas that this research posits to investigate. Since the present research is conducted in Hong Kong where a majority of population is Chinese ethnicity and yet is westernized in a number of aspects, assuming that users in Hong Kong are characterized by eastern or western culture is less useful. Explicit cultural characteristics at individual level are tapped into here instead of applying generalization of cultural beliefs to users to more accurately reflect cultural bias. In this vein, the technology acceptance model (TAM) is adapted, extended, and tested for its applicability cross-culturally in Hong Kong on the Octopus. Four cultural dimensions developed by Hofstede are included in this study, namely uncertainty avoidance, masculinity, individualism, and Confucian Dynamism (long-term orientation), to explore their influence on usage behavior through the mediation of perceived usefulness.

TAM is also integrated with the innovation diffusion theory (IDT) to borrow two constructs in relation to innovative characteristics, namely relative advantage and compatibility, in order to enhance the explanatory power of the proposed research model. Besides, the normative accountability of the research model is strengthened by embracing two social influences, namely subjective norm and image. As the last antecedent to perceived usefulness, prior experience serves to bring in the time variation factor to allow level of prior experience to exert both direct and moderating effects on perceived usefulness.

The resulting research model is analyzed by partial least squares (PLS)-based Structural Equation Modeling (SEM) approach. The research findings reveal that all cultural dimensions demonstrate direct effect on perceived usefulness though the influence of uncertainty avoidance is found marginally significant. Other constructs on innovative characteristics and social influences are validated to be significant as hypothesized. Prior experience does indeed significantly moderate the two influences that perceived usefulness receives from relative advantage and compatibility, respectively. The research model has demonstrated convincing explanatory power and so may be employed for further studies in other contexts. In particular, cultural effects play a key role in contributing to the uniqueness of the model, enabling it to be an effective tool to help critically understand increasingly internationalized IS system development and implementation efforts. This research also suggests several practical implications in view of the findings that could better inform managerial decisions for designing, implementing, or promoting smart card-based E-payment system.

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E-services Adoption: Processes by Firms in Developing Nations
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78560-709-7

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Book part
Publication date: 4 September 2017

Jacquelyn Benson, Steffany Kerr and Ashley Ermer

Research on relational maintenance of long-distance or cross-residential romantic relationships is limited. Moreover, relatively little is known about relational…

Abstract

Research on relational maintenance of long-distance or cross-residential romantic relationships is limited. Moreover, relatively little is known about relational maintenance among non-marital intimate partners in later life, many of whom prefer to live-apart-together (LAT) rather than cohabit. This research paper examines how older adults from the United States maintain their romantic relationships across residences. The authors conducted a grounded theory study drawing on interviews collected from 22 older adults in LAT relationships. The data revealed that older LAT partners engage in a process of safeguarding autonomy to maintain their partnerships and relationship satisfaction. Two broad strategies were identified: upholding separateness and reshaping expectations. While safeguarding autonomy was paramount, participants also emphasized the importance of having a flexible mindset about the physical copresence of their relationships. The findings have implications for practice, suggesting that creating an interdependent couple-identity may undermine, or at least have little bearing on, the relationship stability of older LAT couples. Future research is needed to determine how LAT experiences among racially/ethnically or socioeconomically diverse samples might differ.

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Intimate Relationships and Social Change
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-610-5

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 1953

A.D. Baxter

IT is well known that war gives a great impetus to development in many fields, not least of which is that of aircraft propulsion. Such was the case in World War II, when…

Abstract

IT is well known that war gives a great impetus to development in many fields, not least of which is that of aircraft propulsion. Such was the case in World War II, when great strides were made, but it is interesting to note that the pace has hardly slackened in the years following its conclusion. This is perhaps because of the ‘cold’ war which took its place, or perhaps because the introduction of jet propulsion has stimulated thought and action in realms beyond the dreams of the piston engine era. Whatever the cause, the results are apparent and this is a suitable moment to look back and measure the progress of the past seven or eight years.

Details

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology, vol. 25 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0002-2667

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1987

D. Baxter

Infection with the Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) is a public health threat whose significance in the UK has only been generally appreciated over the last 12–18…

Abstract

Infection with the Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) is a public health threat whose significance in the UK has only been generally appreciated over the last 12–18 months. The size of the problem (both current and potential) is difficult to assess, but epidemiological data would suggest that for an urban health district (outside London) one or two residents would have developed Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) in 1986, four will do so in 1987 and six in 1988. The incidence of HIV infections during the same period might be as high as 200, 400 and 600 respectively. This may seem a small number in comparison with overall morbidity and mortality; but between September 1990 and June 1991 the same health district might expect 48 AIDS cases to present if the epidemiological patterns remain constant (ie a doubling time for cases of 10 months).

Details

Journal of Management in Medicine, vol. 2 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-9235

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Abstract

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Handbook of Transport Systems and Traffic Control
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-61-583246-0

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Book part
Publication date: 29 September 2016

Jodi Dworkin, Ellie McCann and Jenifer K. McGuire

The current study was designed to examine how and why divorced parents use computers and the Internet for communication with their coparent and with their child(ren).

Abstract

Purpose

The current study was designed to examine how and why divorced parents use computers and the Internet for communication with their coparent and with their child(ren).

Methodology/approach

The current study utilized the uses and gratification perspective. A subsample of 178 divorced parents with at least one child aged 25 or younger from a larger research project participated. Parents were recruited to participate in a 15-minute online survey through email listservs with a nationwide and demographically diverse reach.

Findings

Analyses revealed that divorced parents are active users of technology, for communicating with their child(ren) as well as with the child(ren)’s other parent. In addition, parents were comfortable using the Internet and accessing online parenting information, citing few barriers to use.

Research limitations/implications

We did not capture the reasons for communicating or the content of communication. Future research should use innovative methodologies and measures to better understand the use of specific technologies and tools to negotiate boundaries between coparents living apart. In addition, a larger, more diverse sample might reveal different patterns of divorced parents’ technology use.

Practical implications

Technology allows for asynchronous communication, staying up to date, making plans, and making decisions with minimal interaction, and thus maintaining boundaries. Our evidence suggests technology could help parents find areas of agreement around their children’s lives in a less contentious environment.

Originality/value

This study provides the essential groundwork for further examination of ways to support coparent communication via technology.

Details

Divorce, Separation, and Remarriage: The Transformation of Family
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-229-3

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Article
Publication date: 13 July 2015

Philip R Magaletta and Alix M McLearen

Delivering suicide risk services (SRS; i.e., assessment and intervention) is an important and demanding aspect of psychological practice in prison settings. Yet the…

Abstract

Purpose

Delivering suicide risk services (SRS; i.e., assessment and intervention) is an important and demanding aspect of psychological practice in prison settings. Yet the authors know from the training literature that supervised opportunities to build skills in this domain are hard to obtain. The unpredictable nature of these crisis events and the seriousness of their consequences make it difficult for psychologists-in-training to gain experience managing them. An effective method for building the foundational base of such skill is through clinical activities during internship. The purpose of this paper is to introduce the topic from the perspective of doctoral psychology internship training in prisons. Conceptualized within a developmental training perspective, three specific supervisory actions that facilitate the practice of SRS for interns are detailed: locating opportunities to monitor the practice of developmentally appropriate SRS skills; utilizing an assessment tool to shape documentation and provide structured feedback on the quality of SRS work; and developing group-based role plays to practice the management skill of verbal interdisciplinary communication.

Design/methodology/approach

Conceptualized within a developmental training perspective, three specific supervisory actions that facilitate the practice of SRS for interns are detailed.

Findings

Findings include three actions: locating opportunities to monitor the practice of developmentally appropriate SRS skills; utilizing an assessment tool to shape documentation and provide structured feedback on the quality of SRS work; and developing group-based role plays to practice the management skill of verbal interdisciplinary communication.

Practical implications

The authors have proposed three clinical supervision activities that can be used to facilitate the SRS learning experience. The strategies proposed are flexible enough to address variability within an individual intern or across a group of interns. While the authors apply the activities to interns, the authors believe it can also be used with early career psychologists as they transition to licensure and/or clinical independence within this practice setting. Ongoing consideration of how supervision is used to transmit the essential skills in this setting is paramount, and the authors hope this paper has provided sufficient justification for beginning the dialogue in this area.

Originality/value

This work has never before been published.

Details

Journal of Aggression, Conflict and Peace Research, vol. 7 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-6599

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Article
Publication date: 14 March 2016

Mustafa Gülfen and Abdil Özdemir

Seeds and nuts include many dietary minerals as well as trace metals. It is very important to determine the nutritional mineral values in seeds and nuts. Many minerals can…

Abstract

Purpose

Seeds and nuts include many dietary minerals as well as trace metals. It is very important to determine the nutritional mineral values in seeds and nuts. Many minerals can be analyzed simultaneously in low concentrations by using inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy. This paper aims to evaluate nutritional values of dietary and trace minerals in selected seeds and nuts.

Design/methodology/approach

Dietary minerals in the sunflower seed (Helianthus annuus), pumpkin seed (Cucurbita pepo L.), peanut (Arachis hypogaea) and corn (Zea mays L.) samples collected from the markets in Sakarya city of Turkey have been analyzed. Two digestion procedures were applied by using hydrochloric acid solution and the mixture of nitric acid and hydrogen peroxide solution.

Findings

In the evaluation of the mineral contributions of the nuts, the micro-mineral contributions (Cu, Fe, Zn, Mn and Se) were found at higher values than the macro-minerals (Ca, Mg, K and Na). Potassium was determined as the most abundant mineral, and sodium was found at lower levels. The results showed that nuts are trace mineral suppliers and possible Na-K regulator foods in human nutrition.

Social/implications

The obtained results for the mineral profile and daily intake values provide useful information that could sensitize the people on the consumption of seeds and nuts.

Originality/value

Findings from the digestion procedures and the assessments based on the recommended daily intakes have got valuable impact.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science, vol. 46 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 21 May 2018

Devrim Murat Yazan, Davide Cafagna, Luca Fraccascia, Martijn Mes, Pierpaolo Pontrandolfo and Henk Zijm

This paper aims to understand the implementation of a circular economic business where animal manure is used to produce biogas and alternative fertilizer in a regional…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to understand the implementation of a circular economic business where animal manure is used to produce biogas and alternative fertilizer in a regional network of manure suppliers and biogas producers and to reveal the impacts of five variables (manure quantity, transportation distance, manure dry content, manure price and manure discharge price) on the economic sustainability of manure-based biogas supply chains.

Design/methodology/approach

An enterprise input-output approach is used to model physical and monetary flows of the manure-based biogas supply chain. Computational experiments are performed on all variables to identify under which conditions the cooperation is beneficial for all actors.

Findings

The cooperation is profitable for a large-scale farm (>20,000 t/year) if biogas producer (b) pays farmer (f) to receive its manure (5 €/t) or if f sells manure for free and manure disposal costs are >10 €/t. Cooperation is always profitable for b if f pays b to supply its manure (5€/t). If b receives manure for free, benefits are always positive if b is a medium-large-scale plant (>20,000 t/year). For a small-scale plant, benefits are positive if manure dry content (MDC) is ≥12 per cent and transportation distance is ≤10 km.

Originality/value

The paper adds value to the biogas production research, as it makes holistic analysis of five variables which might change under different policy and geographical conditions. The investors in biogas production, suppliers and transportation companies can find correspondence to empirical findings for their own site-specific cases.

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Book part
Publication date: 4 January 2013

Lynn E. Shanahan, Mary B. McVee, Jennifer A. Schiller, Elizabeth A. Tynan, Rosa L. D’Abate, Caroline M. Flury-Kashmanian, Tyler W. Rinker, Ashlee A. Ebert and H. Emily Hayden

Purpose – This chapter provides the reader with an overview of a reflective video pedagogy for use within a literacy center or within professional development contexts…

Abstract

Purpose – This chapter provides the reader with an overview of a reflective video pedagogy for use within a literacy center or within professional development contexts. The conceptual overview is followed by two-case examples that reveal how literacy centers can serve as rich, productive research sites for the use and study of reflective video pedagogy.

Methodology/approach – The authors describe their ongoing work to develop and integrate a reflective video pedagogy within a literacy center during a 15-week practicum for literacy-specialists-in-training. The reflective video pedagogy is not only used by the clinicians who work with struggling readers twice a week, but it is also used by the researchers at the literacy center who study the reflective video pedagogy through the same video the clinicians use.

Practical implications – Literacy centers are dynamic sites where children, families, pre/in-service teachers, and teacher educators work together around literacy development. Reflective video pedagogies can be used to closely examine learning and teaching for adult students (i.e., clinicians) and for youth (i.e., children in elementary, middle, and high school) and also for parents who want their children to find success with literacy.

Research implications – In recent years “scaling up” and “scientific research” have come to dominate much of the literacy research landscape. While we see the value and necessity of large-scale experimental studies, we also posit that literacy centers have a unique role to play. Given that resources are scarce, literacy scholars must maximize the affordances of literacy centers as rich, productive research sites for the use and study of a reflective video pedagogy.

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