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Article
Publication date: 6 May 2021

Cem Sen, Ibrahim Sani Mert and A. Mohammed Abubakar

A traditional view of an ideal workplace is an organization with a justice climate and a supportive atmosphere. Over the past years, justice and support practices in the…

Abstract

Purpose

A traditional view of an ideal workplace is an organization with a justice climate and a supportive atmosphere. Over the past years, justice and support practices in the workplace have received significant scholarly, practical and even political attention. Unfortunately, theoretical underpinnings and literature associated with these themes vary across multiple disciplines, cultural and contextual settings. To fill the void from the Turkish contextual perspective, the present study aims to examine the association among perceived organizational support (POS), organizational justice and cynicism.

Design/methodology/approach

The sample was chosen from the public employees in the central organization of two ministries in Ankara Province. Data through questionnaires were collected by the conveniency method from a total of 326 public employees. The proposed model is analyzed withvariance-based structural equation modeling technique.

Findings

Results suggest that POS and organizational justice exert a negative impact on cynicism. In particular, as employees-POS and organizational justice increases, the tendency for organizational cynicism decreases.

Originality/value

In today’s dynamic environment, controlling and reducing the cynicism, which emerges as an important threat to the success of organizations, of employees has become essential in obtaining a sustainable competitive advantage. The originality of this research stems from its ability to put forward how to manage and control cynicism, with the help of organizational support and organizational justice and hence have a power that increases personal and organizational efficiency and performance from the Turkish contextual perspective. There is limited research examining the relationship among organizational POS, organizational justice and cynicism in the Turkish context.

Details

International Journal of Organizational Analysis, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1934-8835

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 27 March 2006

Pamela Brandes and Diya Das

In this article, we situate organizational cynicism at the nexus of the related constructs of burnout, stress, and antisocial behavior. We expand Dean, Brandes, and…

Abstract

In this article, we situate organizational cynicism at the nexus of the related constructs of burnout, stress, and antisocial behavior. We expand Dean, Brandes, and Dharwadkar's (1998) notion of behavioral cynicism to include cynical humor and cynical criticism. We also propose that cynical behavior has important, non-linear effects on employee work performance. Finally, we suggest that cynical behavior may act as a coping mechanism for employees and that such behavior moderates the stress–performance relationship.

Details

Employee Health, Coping and Methodologies
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-76231-289-4

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Book part
Publication date: 7 June 2016

Henri Kuokkanen and William Sun

Many consumer-focused corporate social responsibility (CSR) studies suggest a positive link between the responsibility demonstrated by a company and consumers’ intention…

Abstract

Purpose

Many consumer-focused corporate social responsibility (CSR) studies suggest a positive link between the responsibility demonstrated by a company and consumers’ intention to favor the company in their purchases. Yet an analogous causal effect between corporate social and financial performances is not evident. This chapter conceptualizes how social desirability and cynicism contribute to the discrepancy between consumers’ attitudes and their actual purchase behavior, and analyzes why consumer choices indicated in surveys do not consistently convert into actions.

Methodology/approach

We develop a conceptual framework based on hybrid choice modeling to estimate the impact of two new variables, Corporate Social Desirability and Corporate Social Cynicism, on CSR research. The model presented synthesizes research findings from the fields of CSR and psychology with a discrete choice methodology that allows inclusion of psychological aspects as latent variables.

Findings

The goal of the framework is to bridge the gap between choices stated by consumers in CSR surveys and their actual choices by quantifying and extracting the effects of biases that otherwise threaten the validity of such survey results. As the next step, the practical value of the model must be evaluated through empirical research combining a CSR choice study with social desirability and cynicism measurement.

Originality

The framework proposes a novel way of controlling CSR surveys for potential biases created by social desirability and cynicism and enables quantification of this impact, with potential application to other fields where psychological aspects may distort research results. Future empirical evidence based on the framework may also offer new insights into the mechanisms by which the two biases distort findings.

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Article
Publication date: 8 December 2020

Indirah Indibara and Sanjeev Varshney

This paper aims to examine the effect of social cynicism on consumer cynicism. The negative inferred motive is tested as a mediator between social cynicism and consumer…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examine the effect of social cynicism on consumer cynicism. The negative inferred motive is tested as a mediator between social cynicism and consumer cynicism; whereas, negative affectivity is tested as a moderator between social cynicism and negative inferred motive.

Design/methodology/approach

The study was carried out in India using a mixed-method approach. In the first stage, a survey was conducted to test the moderated mediation model, followed by in-depth interviews in the second stage. The survey was analysed using structural equation modelling, while themes were generated from the data collected through interviews.

Findings

The study established the effect of social cynicism on consumer cynicism. Negative inferred motive mediated the relationship between social cynicism and consumer cynicism. Negative affectivity moderated the influence of social cynicism on negative inferred motive.

Research limitations/implications

With rising anti-consumption behaviours, it is imperative to understand why consumers turn cynical towards marketers. The study indicates that consumer cynicism is influenced by previous experiences of the consumer with the society and is not merely a reaction to arm-twisting by firms. As social cynicism cannot be changed drastically, understanding how it impacts consumer cynicism would help a firm handle its marketing efforts better.

Originality/value

The study empirically validates the relationship between social cynicism and consumer cynicism. The mediating effect of negative inferred motive on consumer cynicism was also validated. The study is also the first to point out the moderating role of negative affectivity on the relationship between social cynicism and negative inferred motive.

Details

Journal of Consumer Marketing, vol. 38 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0736-3761

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 8 December 2020

Noufou Ouedraogo and Mohammed Laid Ouakouak

Organisations implement changes either to address real business imperatives or to follow trends in their industries. But frequent changes in an organisation often lead to…

Abstract

Purpose

Organisations implement changes either to address real business imperatives or to follow trends in their industries. But frequent changes in an organisation often lead to employee change fatigue and change cynicism. The purpose of this study is to investigate the impact of the change logic of appropriateness and the logic of consequences on change fatigue and change cynicism and the impact of change fatigue and change cynicism on change success.

Design/methodology/approach

To carry out this study, the authors collected data on a sample of 320 participants from diverse organisations, and they used structural equation modelling (SEM) techniques to test our hypotheses depicted in the research model.

Findings

The authors found that the change logic of consequences reduces both change fatigue and change cynicism, whereas the change logic of appropriateness increases change fatigue. The authors also found that change fatigue does not have any direct effect on change success, although it maintains an indirect negative effect on change success through change cynicism.

Practical implications

Along with other practical implications, the authors recommend that change managers help employees understand any logic of consequences that sustain their change initiatives. Additionally, change managers should work to prevent change fatigue from turning into change cynicism, which is the real precursor of reduced change success.

Originality/value

This study is among the first to show that employees experience change fatigue and change cynicism differently, depending on the reason underlying the change. It is also among the first to show that change fatigue does not affect change success directly but does so through the interplay of change cynicism.

Details

Journal of Organizational Change Management, vol. 34 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0953-4814

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 2 April 2020

Yuxia Qian and Guowei Jian

This study aims to construct and empirically test a theoretical model of a mediated relationship between ethical leadership and organizational cynicism.

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to construct and empirically test a theoretical model of a mediated relationship between ethical leadership and organizational cynicism.

Design/methodology/approach

From a communication perspective, this study examines the underlying mechanism of the association between ethical leadership and organizational cynicism. A cross-sectional survey was sent to participants in different occupations. Path analysis was used to test the overall model fit.

Findings

The results indicate that ethical leadership has both a direct and indirect effect on organizational cynicism through the mediating role of leader-member exchange (LMX) and organizational identification. However, a surprising finding is that the mediating mechanisms of LMX and organizational identification are not in a parallel structure, but in a serial pattern. That is, the mediating role of LMX is further mediated by organizational identification.

Originality/value

This study contributes to the literature in several aspects. First, the study sheds light on leadership as an important source of organizational cynicism. In particular, the theoretical model presents pathways that show how the predictive effects of ethical leadership on organizational cynicism are mediated through leader-member relationships and organizational identification. Second, the theoretical analysis on the mediating process highlights the role of communication in facilitating the influence of leadership and constructing organizational identification. Third, the mediating model offers concrete guidance for organizations in their attempt to mitigate organizational cynicism.

Details

Corporate Communications: An International Journal, vol. 25 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1356-3289

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 21 August 2020

Henri Kuokkanen and William Sun

Previous studies support the notion that corporate social responsibility (CSR) initiatives can have a positive effect on customers in the hospitality and tourism industry…

Abstract

Purpose

Previous studies support the notion that corporate social responsibility (CSR) initiatives can have a positive effect on customers in the hospitality and tourism industry. However, most of these studies have ignored response biases and none have incorporated them into their analyses numerically. This study aims at closing this research gap.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors utilized a hybrid choice model to test for the hypothesized effects of social desirability (SD) and cynicism biases on reported purchase intention. The authors further compared the results with those of analyses that ignore these biases to demonstrate their distorting influence.

Findings

The results indicate that SD and cynicism biases have a moderating effect on reported purchase intention. Older generations and frequent travelers seem particularly prone to bias, and the biases have a distorting effect on the overall survey results.

Research limitations/implications

Traditional analyses that exclude biases, incorrectly, suggest several aspects of CSR that are significant (or insignificant) to purchase intention, provide unreliable results. The authors did not generalize bias-prone respondent segments but urge future research to investigate this.

Practical implications

Hotel managers aspiring to gain competitive advantage through CSR investment must consider biases in their market research. Otherwise, they risk developing CSR initiatives that do not instigate positive customer behaviors, leading to the failure of the investment.

Originality/value

The authors quantified SD and cynicism as significant causes of response bias, which distorts survey results. Previous studies have conceptualized SD without quantifying its impact, while cynicism has been identified as a novel source of bias in the industry. This study further introduces hybrid choice modeling as a novel approach to address response bias that could extend itself beyond the industry studied here.

Details

Journal of Hospitality and Tourism Insights, vol. 3 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2514-9792

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 16 April 2020

Saima Naseer, Usman Raja, Fauzia Syed and Muhammad Usman Anwar Baig

Using conservation of resources theory (COR), the authors test the combined effects of cynicism and psychological capital on counterproductive work behaviors (CWBs…

Abstract

Purpose

Using conservation of resources theory (COR), the authors test the combined effects of cynicism and psychological capital on counterproductive work behaviors (CWBs) mediated through emotional exhaustion.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors use a time-lagged independent source sample (N = 181) consisting of employee–peer dyads from service industry in Pakistan.

Findings

Moderated mediated regression analyses indicated that emotional exhaustion mediates the relationship between organizational cynicism and counterproductive work behaviors. Psychological capital moderates the relationship between organizational cynicism and emotional exhaustion such that organizational cynicism is positively related to exhaustion when psychological capital is low. Furthermore, conditional indirect effects show that emotional exhaustion mediates the relationship between organizational cynicism and counterproductive work behaviors only when employees' psychological capital is low.

Originality/value

The study suggests new mechanisms and boundary conditions through which cynicism triggers CWBs. The authors discuss the implications of the study’s findings and suggest possible directions for future research.

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Article
Publication date: 19 February 2020

Kristyn A. Scott and David Zweig

Adopting a social exchange framework, this article examines the relationship between organizational cynicism and leader–member exchange (LMX) using two different methodologies.

Abstract

Purpose

Adopting a social exchange framework, this article examines the relationship between organizational cynicism and leader–member exchange (LMX) using two different methodologies.

Design/methodology/approach

Study 1 utilizes a longitudinal panel design (N = 291) to examine the reciprocal relationships between organizational cynicism and LMX over time. Study 2 (N = 348) positions loyalty as a possible mechanism through which organizational cynicism might impair LMX.

Findings

Study 1 provides evidence for the existence of some reciprocity in the relationships between organizational cynicism and LMX; however, organizational cynicism appears to be a stronger predictor of LMX than the obverse. The results of Study 2 suggest that cynical employees are less loyal to their supervisors, and this cynicism can interfere with the reciprocity process inherent in the creation and maintenance of high-quality social exchanges at work.

Originality/value

This is the first study to examine the relations between organizational cynicism and LMX in a longitudinal design. Additionally, the inclusion of loyalty and demonstration that organizational cynicism impacts loyalty to supervisors negatively represents a novel direction in organizational cynicism research.

Details

Personnel Review, vol. 49 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 16 October 2018

Mohamed Mousa

This paper aims to discover the effect of cultural diversity challenges (organizational communication, work- related discrimination and training) on physicians’ cognitive…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to discover the effect of cultural diversity challenges (organizational communication, work- related discrimination and training) on physicians’ cognitive, affective and behavioral cynicism in the context of public hospitals, Menoufia (Egypt).

Design/methodology/approach

A total of 360 physicians at public hospitals in Menoufia (Egypt) were contacted and all of them received a set of questionnaires. After five follow ups, a total of 240 responses were collected with a response rate of 66.67 per cent.

Findings

The findings suggest that only communication is considered the main and significant predictor for cognitive, affective and behavioral cynicism. Accordingly, when physicians perceive well-coordinated and balanced communication, they feel that their hospital has an adequate level of integrity and consequently will have a positive attitude toward it.

Practical implications

Through well-formulated organizational communication, the hospital administration can decrease the organizational cynicism among physicians and subsequently their unwanted behavior. It is needless to say that when physicians experience an open-door communication climate, they experience a sense of psychological safety and give their very best.

Originality/value

This paper contributes by filling a gap in management and organization literature, in which empirical studies on cultural diversity and organizational cynicism were limited until now.

Details

Journal of Global Responsibility, vol. 9 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2041-2568

Keywords

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