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Article

Lynne Bowker

This paper aims to investigate the potential benefits and limitations associated with aligning accreditation and academic program reviews in post-secondary institutions…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to investigate the potential benefits and limitations associated with aligning accreditation and academic program reviews in post-secondary institutions, using a descriptive case study approach.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper describes two Canadian graduate programs that are subject to both external professional accreditation and institutional cyclical reviews, as they underwent an aligned review. The process was developed as a collaborative effort between the academic units, the professional associations and the university’s graduate-level quality assurance office. For each program, a single self-study was developed, a single review panel was constituted, and a single site visit was conducted. The merits and challenges posed by the alignment process are discussed.

Findings

Initial feedback from the academic units suggests that the alignment of accreditation and program reviews is perceived as reducing the burden on programs with regard to the time and effort invested by faculty, staff and other stakeholders, as well as in terms of financial expenses. Based on this feedback, along with input from reviewers and program evaluation committee members, 14 recommendations emerged for ways in which an aligned review process can be set up for success.

Practical implications

The results suggest that aligned reviews are not only resource-efficient but also allow reviewers to provide more holistic feedback that faculty may be more willing to engage with for program enhancement.

Originality/value

The present study contributes to the existing body of knowledge about conducting aligned reviews in response to external accreditation requirements or institutional needs. It summarizes the potential benefits and limitations and offers recommendations for potential best practices for carrying out aligned reviews for policymakers and practitioners.

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Article

John R. Sparkes

Cyclical fluctuations in the level and rate of growth of economic activity have long been a feature of the British economy. The ability to forecast “turning points” (peaks…

Abstract

Cyclical fluctuations in the level and rate of growth of economic activity have long been a feature of the British economy. The ability to forecast “turning points” (peaks and troughs) in business activity is of crucial importance for changes in companies' stockholding policy, hiring policy, capital budgeting, and many other aspects of corporate appraisal.

Details

Managerial Finance, vol. 7 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4358

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Book part

Guoxiang Song

To raise the quality of regulatory capital, Basel III capital rules recognize unrealized gains and losses on all available-for-sale (AFS) securities in Common Equity Tier…

Abstract

To raise the quality of regulatory capital, Basel III capital rules recognize unrealized gains and losses on all available-for-sale (AFS) securities in Common Equity Tier 1 Capital (CET1). However, by examining the correlations between U.S. GDP growth rate, interest rates and regulatory capital ratios computed using Basel III regulatory capital definition for six U.S. global systemically important banks (G-SIBs) since 2007, this chapter finds that Basel III regulatory capital will enhance the pro-cyclicality of Basel III leverage ratio and Tier 1 capital ratio and their sensitivity to long-term interest rates. Therefore, Basel III capital standards may have significant implications for bank supervision and bank capital risk management in the near future. As banks will hold more high-quality liquid assets (HQLAs) as required by Basel III Liquidity Coverage Ratio (LCR), the weight of unrealized gains and losses arising from fair value accounting will increase in Basel III Tier 1 capital base, the consequent increase of pro-cyclicality in a bank’s regulatory capital ratios may distort the true picture of bank capital adequacy. If an expected loss approach (EL) is used as the provisioning model, such capital risk may be increased further. Moreover, as U.S. monetary policy has started tapering quantitative easing, long-term interest rates will increase inevitably. This may increase the negative impact of unrealized gains and losses on AFS securities on bank capital. As a result, it may be difficult for banks to maintain appropriate capital ratios to meet regulatory requirements and support business activities.

Details

Risk Management Post Financial Crisis: A Period of Monetary Easing
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78441-027-8

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Article

Dov Izraeli

Examines the process of change in marketing channels and its cyclical nature. Looks at the contradictory problems of the needs of small retailers and efficient…

Abstract

Examines the process of change in marketing channels and its cyclical nature. Looks at the contradictory problems of the needs of small retailers and efficient distribution, suggesting possible answers. Explores the implications of the rise of franchising for channels and the economy as a whole. Provides some current options for manufacturers to secure their marketing channels.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 5 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

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Article

Chitra Dey and Ganesh M.P.

The purpose of this paper is an examination of the literature on team boundary activity to trace how team boundary activity has evolved as a construct and examine the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is an examination of the literature on team boundary activity to trace how team boundary activity has evolved as a construct and examine the dimensions of team boundary activity and their relationships. It highlights the need for a deeper examination of the dimensions of buffering and reinforcement, and why buffering and reinforcement are required. It presents the case of why it is important to study this topic and maps out areas for future research.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper reviews conceptual and empirical papers published on team boundary activity in reputed journals between the years 1984 and 2016.

Findings

The focus of research in team boundary activity has been on external interactions of the team (boundary spanning), and very few papers have studied the activities through which the team defines and defends its borders (boundary strengthening). These boundary-strengthening activities can be equally important for innovation and learning in externally dependent teams. Further, there is a need to clearly distinguish these constructs from other variables like team identification. Another area that has here-to not been researched is the relationships between the dimensions of team boundary activity. Last, there is a need to consider a wider range of antecedents, outcomes and moderators of team boundary activity.

Research limitations/implications

This paper is based on past empirical and conceptual papers, identified using search terms such as team boundary activity, team boundary spanning and external communication. Other related areas can also be explored for identifying variables of interest.

Originality/value

As opposed to previous reviews which focused mainly on team boundary spanning, this paper considers all dimensions of team boundary activity, with special focus on buffering and reinforcement. It proposes a 2 × 2 framework to explain the effect of boundary-spanning and boundary-strengthening activities on the achievement of team objectives. It examines the cyclical nature of relationship between team boundary activity and team performance. It highlights measurement issues in the area of team boundary activity.

Details

Team Performance Management: An International Journal, vol. 23 no. 5/6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-7592

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Article

Lynne Bowker and César Villamizar

This paper aims to explore the benefits of embedding a records manager into a team of university administrators to help them address their information management needs.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to explore the benefits of embedding a records manager into a team of university administrators to help them address their information management needs.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper describes an experience that was inspired by reports of successful experiences with embedded librarianship. The literature on records management culture and embedded librarianship is reviewed to identify best practices and criteria for success. These criteria are used to design and implement a pilot project where, rather than hiring a consultant, a records manager is embedded into a quality assurance team working at a large university in Canada.

Findings

The project is a success in conventional terms (e.g. active files reduced; duplicates deleted; inactive files archived; naming conventions, version control and access rights applied); however, similar results could have been achieved using a consultant. More interesting are the added benefits achieved through embedding. Added benefits included identifying workflow inefficiencies, identifying terminological inconsistencies, iterative training opportunities and useful knowledge sharing outside the project’s scope. The argument is made that an embedded information professional is better able to appreciate the organizational culture, which in turn facilitates the establishment of trusted relationships and produces an overall added value for the entire team.

Originality/value

There is very little, if any, current literature that explores the value of embedding a records manager into a team, rather than simply hiring a consultant to address information management needs. The outcome of this pilot project will benefit those who are seeking to develop a model for embedding an information professional into their organization to gain an added value.

Details

Records Management Journal, vol. 27 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0956-5698

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Article

Ching‐Jong Liao and Chien‐Yuan Kao

Suggests that with the shortage of nursing personnel, hospital administrators have to pay more attention to the needs of nurses to retain and recruit them. Also asserts…

Abstract

Suggests that with the shortage of nursing personnel, hospital administrators have to pay more attention to the needs of nurses to retain and recruit them. Also asserts that improving nurses’ schedules is one of the most economic ways for the hospital administration to create a better working environment for nurses. Develops an algorithm for scheduling nursing personnel. Contrary to the current hospital approach, which schedules nurses on a person‐by‐person basis, the proposed algorithm constructs schedules on a day‐by‐day basis. The algorithm has inherent flexibility in handling a variety of possible constraints and goals, similar to other non‐cyclical approaches. But, unlike most other non‐cyclical approaches, it can also generate a quality schedule in a short time on a microcomputer. The algorithm was coded in C language and run on a microcomputer. The developed software is currently implemented at a leading hospital in Taiwan. The response to the initial implementation is quite promising.

Details

Health Manpower Management, vol. 23 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0955-2065

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Article

Lynne Bowker

Using a descriptive case study approach, this paper aims to validate academic librarians’ perceptions that they are marginalized by faculty during academic program reviews

Abstract

Purpose

Using a descriptive case study approach, this paper aims to validate academic librarians’ perceptions that they are marginalized by faculty during academic program reviews, and recommends ways for the two groups to collaborate more effectively to make program reviews more meaningful.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper describes a case study at a Canadian university where the six types of documents produced as part of the program review process for ten graduate programs were analyzed using corpus analysis tools and techniques, such as keyword generation and key word in context analysis. For each program, documents were examined to determine the volume and nature of the discussion involving libraries in the self-study, library report annex, site visit itinerary, external reviewers’ report, academic program’s response and final assessment report.

Findings

The empirical evidence from the corpus analysis validates the findings of previous perception-based studies and confirms that librarians currently have a minor role in program reviews. Best practices and gaps emerged, prompting five recommendations for ways in which academic librarians can play a more meaningful role in the program review process.

Practical implications

The results suggest that programs are not currently putting their best foot forward during program reviews, but this could be improved by including librarians more fully in the program review process.

Originality/value

The present study contributes to the existing body of knowledge about the role of academic librarians in the program review process by providing direct and empirical measures to triangulate previous perception-based investigations that rely on surveys and interviews. It summarizes limitations of the current institutional quality assurance process and the benefits to be gained by involving librarians more in the process. It offers recommendations for policymakers and practitioners with regard to potential best practices for facilitating librarian involvement in academic program reviews.

Details

Quality Assurance in Education, vol. 26 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0968-4883

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Article

Robert A. Ellis, Nerida Jarkey, Mary Jane Mahony, Mary Peat and Stephen Sheely

This paper seeks to discuss the characteristics that shape a model to manage eLearning in a large, predominantly campus‐based university. It focuses on how such a model…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper seeks to discuss the characteristics that shape a model to manage eLearning in a large, predominantly campus‐based university. It focuses on how such a model can provide a sustainable approach to supporting eLearning for more than 40,000 students while still managing basic quality assurance for the University executive and the individual disciplinary needs of faculties.

Design/methodology/approach

Prior research and theoretical issues related to a generalised course development and teaching process are discussed followed by an analysis of a case‐study from a large metropolitan Australian university. The case‐study illustrates key aspects of the management model providing insights into how staff are empowered and supported to develop meaningful eLearning resources for students, how quality improvement is managed, and how organizational learning takes place.

Findings

Following the analysis of how key aspects of the model relate to the university discussed in the case study, several challenges for quality improvement at the level of both course and university are identified. The case‐study reveals the complexity of quality improvement strategies, which (mainly due to the fact that eLearning complements the face‐to‐face learning experience) require a relational and embedded approach. Key principles for managing eLearning development and evaluation for campus‐based universities are abstracted from the case‐study and offered as a guide to universities who face similar challenges

Research limitations/implications

Although not all aspects of the case‐study can be applied to other contexts, the key principles of the proposed management model are likely to apply to other campus‐based universities which share the same focus on integrating eLearning in sustainable ways but also wish to foreground quality assurance issues.

Originality/value

The paper integrates the discussion of theoretical approaches and models for eLearning management in higher education with the description of a case‐study from a large, diverse, campus‐based university, while highlighting the complexity and practical challenges of implementing such a model.

Details

Quality Assurance in Education, vol. 15 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0968-4883

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Article

Jim Murphy

Aims to provide a theoretical basis for, and overview of,self‐evaluation as a beneficial practice. Discusses six issues: (1)types of entrepreneurial organizations and…

Abstract

Aims to provide a theoretical basis for, and overview of, self‐evaluation as a beneficial practice. Discusses six issues: (1) types of entrepreneurial organizations and metaphors which may be used to think about them; (2) how self‐evaluation is usefully seen as a learning process; (3) common problems which trigger learning by organizations; (4) Self‐Evaluation and Effectiveness Review Model (SEER) as a proposed learning process; (5) how learning can help firms to overcome problems and improve members′ effective performance; and (6) the utility of the SEER concept in a world with variable national management cultures. Hopes to persuade an influential entrepreneur of the need to plan a process which will network members′ learning for the benefit of their organization.

Details

Leadership & Organization Development Journal, vol. 13 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7739

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