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Article

Shouxu Wang, Li Feng, Yuanming Chen, Wei He, Zhihua Tao, Shijing Chen and Huan Xu

The purpose of this paper is to form good cutting qualities in glass-epoxy material for opening flexible areas of rigid-flex printed circuit boards (PCB) by ultraviolet…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to form good cutting qualities in glass-epoxy material for opening flexible areas of rigid-flex printed circuit boards (PCB) by ultraviolet (UV) laser cutting.

Design/methodology/approach

The cut width and cut depth of glass-epoxy materials were both observed to evaluate their cutting qualities. The heat affected zone (HAZ) of the glass-epoxy material was also investigated after UV laser cutting. The relationships between the cut width and the parameters of various factors were analyzed using an orthogonal experimental design.

Findings

The cut width of the glass-epoxy material gradually increased with the increment of the laser power and Z-axis height, while cutting speed and laser frequency had less effect on the cut width. Optimal parameters of the UV laser process for cutting glass-epoxy material were obtained and included a laser power of 6W, a cutting speed of 170 mm/s, a laser frequency of 50 kHz and a Z-axis height of 0.6 mm, resulting in an average cut width of 25 μm and small HAZ.

Originality/value

Flexible areas of rigid-flex PCBs are in good agreement with the cutting qualities of the UV laser. The use of a UV laser process could have important potential for cutting glass-epoxy materials used in the PCB industry.

Details

Circuit World, vol. 40 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0305-6120

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Article

Marco Anilli, Ali Gökhan Demir and Barbara Previtali

The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate the use of selective laser melting for producing single and double chamber laser cutting nozzles. The main aim is to assess a…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate the use of selective laser melting for producing single and double chamber laser cutting nozzles. The main aim is to assess a whole production chain composed of an additive manufacturing (AM) and consecutive finishing processes together. Beyond the metrological and flow-related characterization of the produced nozzles, functional analysis on the use of the produced nozzles are carried out through laser cutting experiments.

Design/methodology/approach

SLM experiments were carried out to determine the correct compensation factor to achieve a desired nozzle diameter on steel with known processibility by SLM and using standard nozzle geometries for comparative purposes. The produced nozzles are finished through electrochemical machining (ECM) and abrasive flow machining (AFM). The performance of nozzles produced via additive manufacturing (AM) are compared to conventional ones on an industrial laser cutting system through cutting experiments with a 6 kW fibre laser. The produced nozzles are characterized in terms of pressure drop and flow dynamics through Schlieren imaging.

Findings

The manufacturing chain was regulated to achieve 1 mm diameter nozzles after consecutive post processing. The average surface roughness could be lowered by approximately 80 per cent. The SLM produced single chamber nozzles would perform similarly to conventional nozzles during the laser cutting of 1 mm mild steel with nitrogen. The double chamber nozzles could provide complete cuts with oxygen on 5 mm-thick mild steel only after post-processing. Post-processing operations proved to decrease the pressure drop of the nozzles. Schlieren images showed jet constriction at the nozzle outlet on the as-built nozzles.

Originality/value

In this work, the use of an additive manufacturing process is assessed together with suitable finishing and functional analysis of the related application to provide a complete production and evaluation chain. The results show how the finishing processes should be allocated in an AM-based production chain in a broader vision. In particular, the results confirm the functionality for designing more complex nozzle geometries for laser cutting, exploiting the flexibility of SLM process.

Details

Rapid Prototyping Journal, vol. 24 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-2546

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Article

Brian Rooks

The current state in the application of lasers for cutting and welding is reviewed. Most cutting operations are performed on specifically developed laser machine tools…

Abstract

The current state in the application of lasers for cutting and welding is reviewed. Most cutting operations are performed on specifically developed laser machine tools such as the Trumpf Lasercell and its application in the development of trim shapes and low volume panel production at a sub‐contract toolmaker is described. Robots are mainly used with lasers for welding, particularly of vehicle body components where laser welds are found to be advantageous in reducing material weight and improving body strength. One example is the production of differing thickness panels and a robotic installation for producing car door inners is described. The benefits of the new generation of Nd:YAG power lasers are listed, including the ability to transmit the laser beam via fibre optic cables. This is particularly advantageous when robots are used to manipulate the “torch” and a new robot cell from Trumpf is described. Finally, the role of gases in laser processing is discussed.

Details

Industrial Robot: An International Journal, vol. 27 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-991X

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Article

Chris Williams

Looks at the various applications of the CO2 gas laser in industrial material processing. Describes how the CO2 laser beam interacts with particular materials and…

Abstract

Looks at the various applications of the CO2 gas laser in industrial material processing. Describes how the CO2 laser beam interacts with particular materials and highlights the laser system configuration, system characteristics and attributes. Details CO2 laser cutting, welding and surface modification and briefly touches on some emerging aerospace application areas.

Details

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology, vol. 69 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0002-2667

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Article

Clive Montague‐Brown

Laser cutting of sheet metal in both the flat and pressed form is a well‐established technique which has been used for many years. The limitations of this process are a…

Abstract

Laser cutting of sheet metal in both the flat and pressed form is a well‐established technique which has been used for many years. The limitations of this process are a relatively slow speed of operation and the high capital and running costs of operating lasers. The quality of edge finish and dangers of working with lasers are additional disadvantages of the technology. Contour Cutting Technology Limited have now developed a multi‐axis plasma cutting system which produces a high‐quality finish at speeds three or four times the speed of lasers, and at around 40 per cent of the capital cost of a comparable laser system. Material from 0.8mm up to about 6mm can be successfully cut with a good quality edge finish.

Details

Assembly Automation, vol. 19 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-5154

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Article

Brian Rooks

This paper focuses on some of the presentations given at a technical workshop on “Laser processing of polymer‐based materials”, organised by Association of Industrial Laser

Abstract

This paper focuses on some of the presentations given at a technical workshop on “Laser processing of polymer‐based materials”, organised by Association of Industrial Laser Users. Applications in cutting and welding are discussed and specifically how different combinations of polymer materials and laser types produce different results. Applications are described that include pre‐weakening of car trims for integrated airbags and “on the fly” scribing of web materials used in packaging. In several of these applications, robots play an important role in manipulating the laser beam.

Details

Industrial Robot: An International Journal, vol. 31 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-991X

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Article

M.R. Jackson and M.E. Preston

The problems of pattern cutting as applied to flexible elastic mesh fabrics (lace) are described within the context of the total manufacturing process. While the design…

Abstract

The problems of pattern cutting as applied to flexible elastic mesh fabrics (lace) are described within the context of the total manufacturing process. While the design and knitting stages of lace manufacture are highly computerised, providing associated benefits, the cutting room operates with conventional, slow, labour intensive machinery, leading to substantial processing bottlenecks and dependent costs. A new system is presented which uses machine vision to determine the required cutting path on the lace fabric in real‐time via sophisticated, yet high speed, image processing algorithms. The determined cutting path data are used to direct a high speed CO2 laser beam to the correct cutting point with beam velocities of typically 6 m/sec. Simultaneous dual edge cutting is now possible using this new system, leading to lace throughput being increased by a factor of ten typically, with the possibility of processing more sophisticated designs and achieving higher cut edge quality.

Details

Integrated Manufacturing Systems, vol. 9 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-6061

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Article

Ian Kirkpatrick

Lasers are currently the technological flavour of the month. The dazzling versatility of light at work tends to blind the onlooker both in its deficiencies and the…

Abstract

Lasers are currently the technological flavour of the month. The dazzling versatility of light at work tends to blind the onlooker both in its deficiencies and the availability of credible alternatives. This paper compares laser cutting and plasma cutting technologies. It concludes that careful appraisal of manufacturing requirements would probably reveal that equally satisfactory productivity was possible, and higher acceptable dimensional accuracy and edge finish, by opting for high definition plasma profiling. In doing so a lot of money would be saved.

Details

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology, vol. 70 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0002-2667

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Article

Robert Bogue

The purpose of this paper is to provide a review of robotic cutting techniques and applications.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to provide a review of robotic cutting techniques and applications.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper firstly describes the main cutting techniques used with robots and subsequently discusses robotic cutting applications, giving examples of specific uses.

Findings

This paper shows that robotic laser, water‐jet, ultrasonic, plasma and oxy‐gas cutting techniques are used in a wide range of industries on materials which include plastics, metals, fabrics, foodstuffs and even human tissues. The use of a particular technique reflects application‐specific factors such as material, thickness, precision, cut quality and cutting speed.

Originality/value

Provides an introduction to robotic cutting techniques and their applications.

Details

Industrial Robot: An International Journal, vol. 35 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-991X

Keywords

Content available

Abstract

Details

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology, vol. 71 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0002-2667

Keywords

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