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Article
Publication date: 13 February 2019

Belén Ruiz and Juan A. García

The purpose of this paper is to explore the moderating role of culture in terms of uncertainty avoidance in the antecedents of customer-based bank reputation in two…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the moderating role of culture in terms of uncertainty avoidance in the antecedents of customer-based bank reputation in two countries with different cultural patterns.

Design/methodology/approach

This study was carried out by surveying 910 bank customers of the main banks in the UK and Spain. The hypotheses employed in this research were developed by contrasting the moderating role of uncertainty avoidance in the relationships between bank reputation and its antecedents, and were then tested through the use of partial least squares modelling.

Findings

Significant differences between British and Spanish bank customers were found with regard to the impact of innovation, workplace and leadership on bank reputation. However, the results obtained when considering uncertainty avoidance as a continuous moderator variable suggested that only the differences found as regards workplace and leadership were owing to this variable, thus providing empirical support for two out of the eight hypotheses developed on the basis of cultural theories.

Originality/value

This is the first study to analyse whether the relative importance of the antecedents of bank reputation differ with regard to customersuncertainty avoidance patterns, which is the cultural variable that is most closely linked in literature to customers’ banking decisions. This study contributes towards reputation research by showing that cultural differences in terms of uncertainty avoidance should be used with caution when establishing business guides for bank managers.

Details

International Journal of Bank Marketing, vol. 37 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-2323

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Article
Publication date: 20 August 2019

Li-Wei Wu, Chung-Yu Wang and Ellen Rouyer

Value has been conceptualized as the result of co-creation involving service firms and customers. Currently, however, little is known about why and how customers engage in…

Abstract

Purpose

Value has been conceptualized as the result of co-creation involving service firms and customers. Currently, however, little is known about why and how customers engage in value co-creation with a service firm. Thus, the purpose of this paper is to explore the role of co-production in value co-creation in the context of banking services from the customers’ viewpoint. The literature has consistently examined the linear effects of trust and decision-making uncertainty on co-production. The study extends this research stream by considering the negative quadratic effects of trust and decision-making uncertainty on co-production. Therefore, this study not only examines the linear and negative quadratic effects of trust and decision-making uncertainty on co-production within a single, simultaneous model but also tests the effect of co-production on value co-creation. Moreover, this study includes and explores the moderating effects of service innovativeness and service effort on co-production in determining value co-creation.

Design/methodology/approach

The hierarchical moderated regression was used to test the hypotheses.

Findings

The findings support the positive linear effects and negative quadratic effects among trust, decision-making uncertainty and co-production. Meanwhile, the results indicate that co-production positively affect value co-creation. Service innovativeness and service effort enhance the effect of co-production on value co-creation.

Originality/value

This study shows the presence of the opportunity of trust and decision-making uncertainty, which confirms the existing literature, and the challenge of trust and decision-making uncertainty, which extends the literature. This study is the first one to shed light on the negative quadratic effects of trust and decision-making uncertainty on co-production. This study also offers insights into value co-creation and thus enhances the current understanding of value phenomena. Academics and practitioners would greatly benefit from a comprehensive understanding of co-production and the associated value co-creation for the parties involved.

Details

International Journal of Bank Marketing, vol. 38 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-2323

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Article
Publication date: 4 January 2013

Olaf Plötner, Jan Lakotta and Frank Jacob

Customer decision‐making uncertainty (DMU) is a persistent phenomenon in business‐to‐business markets. However, there is substantial variation in the degree to which…

Abstract

Purpose

Customer decision‐making uncertainty (DMU) is a persistent phenomenon in business‐to‐business markets. However, there is substantial variation in the degree to which customers perceive DMU and how suppliers should react to it. The purpose of this paper is to explain variation in customer decision‐making uncertainty.

Design/methodology/approach

Based on existing industrial buying typologies, this paper proposes a new classification scheme to explain variance in customer decision‐making uncertainty. Market offering complexity and co‐creation are used as defining dimensions in the construction of four archetypal types of industrial market offerings.

Findings

The paper demonstrates on a theoretical level that customer decision‐making uncertainty is especially prevalent in complex offerings characterized by high degrees of co‐creation.

Practical implications

This typology helps to provide a more nuanced understanding of the effects of co‐creation on customer value. Firms should adapt their selling approaches to the degree of complexity and co‐creation that they offer their customers.

Originality/value

The originality of the paper rests in explaining customer decision‐making uncertainty in relation to complexity and co‐creation. Thus, it sheds light on the dark side of co‐creating market offerings.

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Article
Publication date: 31 March 2020

Chris Meyer, David Cohen and Sudhir Nair

The paper aims to fill this gap by positing a framework that considers the service automation decision as a matter of knowledge management: a choice between human resident…

Abstract

Purpose

The paper aims to fill this gap by positing a framework that considers the service automation decision as a matter of knowledge management: a choice between human resident and codified knowledge assets.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper is a conceptual paper, grounded in the knowledge-based view.

Findings

The paper uses the information processing theory, which argues that the level of uncertainty in a process should dictate the type of knowledge deployed, as the contingency for the automation choice, and customer interaction uncertainty as the driver of that contingency. From these ideas, propositions are generated relating customer interaction uncertainty and service automation. Further implications for artificial intelligence (AI) are also explored.

Originality/value

The framework illuminates and informs the strategic choices regarding service automation, including the use of AI in professional services, a timely and highly important topic. It offers a valuable model for practitioners and contributes to the academic literature by pointing the way for future directions for scholarly research.

Details

Journal of Service Management, vol. 31 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-5818

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Article
Publication date: 6 March 2017

Melanie E. Kreye

Relational uncertainty determines how relationships develop because it enables the building of trust and commitment. However, relational uncertainty has not been explored…

Abstract

Purpose

Relational uncertainty determines how relationships develop because it enables the building of trust and commitment. However, relational uncertainty has not been explored in an inter-organisational setting. The purpose of this paper is to investigate how organisations experience relational uncertainty in service dyads and how they resolve it through suitable organisational responses to increase the level of service quality.

Design/methodology/approach

The author applies the overall logic of organisational information-processing theory and presents empirical insights from two industrial case studies collected via semi-structured interviews and secondary data.

Findings

The findings suggest that relational uncertainty is caused by the partner’s unresolved organisational uncertainty, i.e. their lacking capabilities to deliver or receive (parts of) the service. Furthermore, the author found that resolving the relational uncertainty increased the functional quality while resolving the partner’s organisational uncertainty increased the technical quality of the delivered service.

Originality/value

The author makes two contributions: first,the author introduces relational uncertainty to the OM literature as the inability to predict and explain the actions of a partnering organisation due to a lack of knowledge about their abilities and intentions; and second, the author presents suitable organisational responses to relational uncertainty and their effect on service quality.

Details

International Journal of Operations & Production Management, vol. 37 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3577

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1996

William L. Smith

We often know what comes next from the first few words of a conversation or interaction. If the interaction is in the context of a service encounter, whether for the…

Abstract

We often know what comes next from the first few words of a conversation or interaction. If the interaction is in the context of a service encounter, whether for the customer or the service provider, those first few words may lead to satisfactory or unsatisfactory perceptions of service quality. This paper presents a communications perspective on the initial interaction of the service encounter in order to suggest a new way service quality issues may be addressed It examines the service encounter from the perspective of uncertainty reduction (UCR) theory. Interpersonal communication theories can inform service system designers and service managers with regard to the service encounter. Reducing uncertainty between customers and service workers in the service encounter should increase perceived service quality experiences. The twelve propositions presented represent the types of issues that might be addressed by future empirical studies.

Details

The International Journal of Organizational Analysis, vol. 4 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1055-3185

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2001

Qingyu Zhang and William J. Doll

While managers and researchers agree that the fuzzy front end of new product development (NPD) is critical for project success, the meaning of the term “front‐end…

Abstract

While managers and researchers agree that the fuzzy front end of new product development (NPD) is critical for project success, the meaning of the term “front‐end fuzziness” remains vague. It is often used broadly to refer to both the exogenous causes and the internal consequences of fuzziness. This imprecise language makes it difficult for managers to separate cause and effect and thus identify specific prescriptive remedies for “fuzziness” problems. The vagueness of the concept and the lack of a framework for defining “front‐end fuzziness” also impede empirical research efforts. Building upon uncertainty theory, we define front‐end fuzziness in terms of environmental uncertainties. Front‐end fuzziness has consequences for a project’s team vision. It reduces the team’s sense of shared purpose and causes unclear project targets and priorities. Describes how foundation elements of a firm’s overall product development program can help project teams cope with front‐end fuzziness.

Details

European Journal of Innovation Management, vol. 4 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1460-1060

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Article
Publication date: 21 October 2013

Melanie E. Kreye, Linda B. Newnes and Yee Mey Goh

– The purpose of this paper is to explore the information that manufacturing companies have available when competitively bidding for service contracts.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the information that manufacturing companies have available when competitively bidding for service contracts.

Design/methodology/approach

A semi-structured interview study was undertaken with industrialists in various sectors, which are currently facing the issue of servitisation.

Findings

One of the main findings was that, despite the novelty of the process, the decision makers at the competitive bidding stage have an understanding of the involved uncertainties. In particular, the uncertainty arising from the customer as the user of the product and evaluator of the competitive bids in addition to the uncertainty connected to the competitors were identified as the main influences on the pricing decision.

Research limitations/implications

The research implications show the influences and considerations during the decision-making process at the competitive bidding stage for service contracts. These include the customer and the competitors.

Practical implications

Shortcomings in the current industrial practice were identified such as the approaches used to communicate the cost estimate for the service contract. The approaches currently used contradict research findings in the area of communicating uncertainty information, which means that further research is to be done to identify optimal approaches to displaying the uncertainty connected to the communicated information.

Originality/value

This paper offers a basis for research to understand the challenges industry faces when competitively bidding for service contracts. This can be used to develop novel approaches in supporting the decision maker such as a model that presents the probability of winning in comparison to the probability of making a profit.

Details

Journal of Manufacturing Technology Management, vol. 24 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-038X

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Article
Publication date: 6 February 2007

Robert C. Fink, Linda F. Edelman and Kenneth J. Hatten

This study aims to test both customer and supplier performance benefits associated with closer relational exchanges in light of both resource and technological…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to test both customer and supplier performance benefits associated with closer relational exchanges in light of both resource and technological environmental contingencies.

Design/methodology/approach

The research involved a survey of 1,170 managers in the pulp and paper industry to understand their relationship with their primary supplier of process control equipment (PCE). Each respondent was asked to provide their views on the closeness of their supplier relationship, the performance gains realized from their supplier relationships, and the linkage between their performance gains and improvements in supplier performance.

Findings

The results indicate that although customers may be achieving better performance through closer relationships, suppliers may not always be reaping reciprocal benefits. Specifically, improvements in customer purchasing performance did not result in improved supplier performance, but customer improvements in production performance resulted in supplier performance gains.

Research limitations/implications

The study focused on the exchange of one product line, PCE, within one industry. Further research is necessary to investigate customer‐supplier relationships involving other products such as parts and material incorporated into the customer's end product and crossing multiple industries. In addition, further research is needed to develop and test other potential performance outcomes and environment contingencies.

Originality/value

Since mutual performance improvements may not always be achieved in relational exchanges, this study suggests some critical considerations for suppliers making decisions to pursue closer customer relationships. These important considerations include the competitive nature of the supplier's market, the customer's desired performance improvement, the customer's level of internal expertise or knowledge, and the supplier's ability to provide differentiated products, services and knowledge.

Details

Journal of Business & Industrial Marketing, vol. 22 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0885-8624

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Article
Publication date: 10 October 2008

Robert C. Fink, William L. James, Kenneth J. Hatten and Lynn Bakstran

The purpose of this research is to understand factors related to increased customer purchases from suppliers during different stages of the customer‐supplier relationship.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this research is to understand factors related to increased customer purchases from suppliers during different stages of the customer‐supplier relationship.

Design/methodology/approach

A survey of 372 professionals in the paper industry was conducted to investigate how customer performance outcomes, supplier quality and delivery performance, the presence of relational norms and customer perspectives of environmental uncertainty vary in their influence on increasing customer purchases over time.

Findings

The results indicate the variables influencing increased customer purchases vary over the duration of the customer‐supplier relationship. It is also shown how the variables influencing increased customer purchases from suppliers are different from the variables leading to increased customer commitment to suppliers over time.

Research limitations/implications

Data were collected from the customer perspective only and involved the exchange of one type of product. Similar studies need to be conducted in other industries involving other types of product exchanges that capture both customer and supplier perspectives to verify these findings.

Practical implications

Supplier sales and marketing managers need to understand the factors related to increased customer purchases and how they change over time to create appropriate sales and marketing strategies for different stages of their customer relationships.

Originality/value

One of the most important sales and marketing objectives is to increase customer purchases; however, it has received limited attention in prior research. This paper adds value by focusing on both the variables related to increased customer purchases and how these factors change in their influence over the duration of the customer‐supplier relationship.

Details

Journal of Business & Industrial Marketing, vol. 23 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0885-8624

Keywords

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