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Article
Publication date: 1 August 2005

Serkan Aydin and Gökhan Özer

To build a National Consumer Satisfaction Index for Turkey, drawing on models already in existence in Sweden, the USA, Norway and the European Union. In so doing, to…

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5336

Abstract

Purpose

To build a National Consumer Satisfaction Index for Turkey, drawing on models already in existence in Sweden, the USA, Norway and the European Union. In so doing, to remedy observed practical shortcomings of those indices.

Design/methodology/approach

Structural equation modelling was applied to the general model, in the specific context of the mobile telephone market in Turkey, based on data collected by questionnaire from more than 1,500 subscribers.

Findings

The purpose‐designed new customer satisfaction index exhibits good fit and strong explanatory power. It is the most comprehensive so far developed, by virtue of adding two new factors to the model.

Research limitations/implications

The new Turkish index was tested for validity and reliability only in the context of mobile telephony; it should ideally now be further tested in different sectors, periodically, to validate comparisons with other national variants. More latent variables and economic data should be incorporated to analyse the links among the index itself, loyalty and economic consequences. It is suggested that the partial least squares method could have been more appropriate than the maximum likelihood iteration procedure actually employed.

Practical implications

Apart from its obvious role in assessing customer satisfaction in a domestic market, a customer satisfaction index can be extended to the level of comparing whole economies. This is of considerable significance for Turkey's ambitions to join the European Union.

Originality/value

This article enhances and extends an established but relatively little known quantitative method for evaluating customer satisfaction, and thereby offers an important diagnostic tool to marketing planners

Details

Marketing Intelligence & Planning, vol. 23 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-4503

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Book part
Publication date: 13 November 2017

Robert Kozielski, Michał Dziekoński, Jacek Pogorzelski and Grzegorz Urbanek

The term ‘strategy’ is one of the most frequently used terms in business, and its application in marketing is particularly common. Company strategy, market strategy…

Abstract

The term ‘strategy’ is one of the most frequently used terms in business, and its application in marketing is particularly common. Company strategy, market strategy, marketing strategy, sales strategy, promotion strategy, distribution strategy, low pricing strategy – it would take a long time to list all of them. Although this term is so commonly in use, its definition is not as straightforward and it can be interpreted in different ways. In comparison with tactical decisions, strategy is much more significant for an organisation as it brings long-lasting consequences. It is implemented by higher level managers on a regular basis, and it is based on external, often subjective information, so decisions – especially at the time they are made – are difficult to evaluate.

Taking into consideration the fact that strategy refers to a long-term rather than a short-term period, strategic decisions serve as the basis for undertaking operational activities. However, marketing refers to the market and the competition. It is possible to claim that marketing strategy is trying to find an answer to the question to which path an organisation should follow in order to achieve its goals and objectives. If, for example, a company has a goal to generate a profit of PLN 1 million by selling 100,000 pieces of a product, the market strategy should answer at least the following two questions:

  1. Who will be our target group, for example, who will purchase the 100,000 pieces of the product?

  2. Why is it us from whom a potential buyer should purchase the product?

Who will be our target group, for example, who will purchase the 100,000 pieces of the product?

Why is it us from whom a potential buyer should purchase the product?

The target market will be defined if a reply to the first question is provided. The second question identifies the foundations of competitive advantage. These two issues, that is, target market and competitive advantage are the strategic marketing issues. You cannot change your target group unexpectedly while competitive advantage is the basis for changing decisions regarding prices, promotions and sales.

This chapter describes the measures of marketing activities which refer to strategic aspects and testify a company’s market position – the measures of the performance of target groups and competitive advantage. Readers’ attention should be also focused on the indices that are less popular in Poland and, therefore, may be underestimated. It seems that some of them, for example, the index of marketing resources allocation and the marketing risk index, provide a lot of valuable information and, at the same time, make it possible to show the value of marketing investments. Their wider use in the near future is only a matter of time.

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Article
Publication date: 13 June 2016

Shulin Lan, Hao Zhang, Ray Y. Zhong and G.Q. Huang

As the modern manufacturing twining seamlessly with logistics operations for value adding services, logistics service is becoming more and more significant. Under this…

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2413

Abstract

Purpose

As the modern manufacturing twining seamlessly with logistics operations for value adding services, logistics service is becoming more and more significant. Under this research background, the purpose of this paper is to introduce an innovative evaluation model for customer satisfaction using fuzzy analytic hierarchy process (FAHP).

Design/methodology/approach

This model uses triangular fuzzy concept to determine the weight of each index so that subjective or objective weighting is addressed. A case study from two large express companies in China is used to demonstrate the feasibility and practicality of the proposed model for examining customer satisfaction.

Findings

One of the key findings is that Company B has higher customer satisfaction than Company A due to its quick response and flexible logistics strategy. This paper has several contributions. First, A FAHP-based customer satisfaction evaluation model is proposed for the logistics service. Second, the triangular fuzzy concept is introduced to determine the weight of each index so as to addresses the limitation of subjective or objective weighting method. Third, a case study demonstrates the implementation of the model.

Research limitations/implications

First, this paper considers the fuzzy AHP for the customer satisfaction evaluation. Comparing with other multi-criteria decision-making methods like data envelopment analysis, evidential reasoning approach, and multi-attribute value theory will be carried out in the near future. Second, the manufacturing modes like make-to-order, make-to-stock, and mass-customized production may have different logistics support so that the final products may reach the final targets quickly. How to evaluate various mode-based logistics and their customer satisfactions have great significance. Finally, Big Data-enabled customer satisfaction evaluation approaches may be a possible solution.

Practical implications

Based on the data from questionnaire, it is found that, in practical applications, manufacturing enterprises should amend the index system according to the specific business scope and the production characteristics. Manufacturing enterprises need to collect large amounts of data through market research and conduct the measurement on the related coefficient between the measurement indicators and customer satisfaction degree. After that, they can make sorting and filtering on the measurement index according to the measurement results.

Social implications

Customer satisfaction is very important to manufacturing and logistics enterprises due to its time constraints. The physical products with services like logistics are paid close attention to by the final customers.

Originality/value

The contribution of this paper is as follows: a FAHP-based customer satisfaction evaluation model is proposed for the logistics service; triangular fuzzy concept is introduced to determine the weight of each index so as to addresses the limitation of subjective or objective weighting method; a case study was used to demonstrate the implementation of the model. One of the key findings is that Company B has higher customer satisfaction than Company B due to its quick response and flexible logistics strategy.

Details

Industrial Management & Data Systems, vol. 116 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-5577

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Article
Publication date: 21 August 2003

Yumin Liu and Jichao Xu

With the development of the American Customer satisfaction index (ACSI), research on customer satisfaction measurement or evaluation methods have become significant in the…

Abstract

With the development of the American Customer satisfaction index (ACSI), research on customer satisfaction measurement or evaluation methods have become significant in the last decade. Most of international customer satisfaction barometers or indices are evolved based on the cause and effect relationship model of ACSI. Of critical importance to validity of customer satisfaction indices is how to construct a measurement attribute or indicator model and provide an effective implementation method effectively. Quality Funcion Deployment (QFD) is a very useful tool for translating the customer voice into product design through quality engineering. In fact, this is a methodology for measuring and analyzing evaluation indicators by their relationship matrix. In this paper, we will make an effort to integrate the framework of QFD into teh measurement problem of customer satisfaction, and also develop a new multi‐phase QFD model for evaluation of Customer Satisfaction Index (CSI). From the houses of quality in this model, the evaluation indicators impacting on customer’s global satisfaction are identified by means of their relationship matrix. Then the evaluation indicator hierarchy and its measurement method for the customer satisfaction index are presented graphically. Furthermore, survey data from the Chinese autombobile maintenance sector and a relevant case study are utilized to show the implementation method of the QFD model used to measure and analyze of customer satisfaction.

Details

Asian Journal on Quality, vol. 4 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1598-2688

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Article
Publication date: 20 February 2019

Anastasia Golovkova, Jan Eklof, Aleksandra Malova and Olga Podkorytova

The purpose of this paper is to examine the relationship between customer satisfaction measured as Extended Performance Satisfaction Index (EPSI) and the financial…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the relationship between customer satisfaction measured as Extended Performance Satisfaction Index (EPSI) and the financial performance of the banking sector for seven European countries over the period 2004–2014.

Design/methodology/approach

Using panel models, this study finds a significant positive influence of EPSI on banking financial performance at the country level.

Findings

Findings suggest that the value of the customer satisfaction index is important in explaining the financial performance of the banking industry at the aggregative country level. The customer satisfaction index measured as EPSI has a strong positive influence on the financial performance of the banking industry for the various North European countries studied. It was shown that EPSI has a positive influence on both total assets and total equity, with a higher relative influence and stronger significance on the total assets of the banking sector than on total equity.

Originality/value

The study contributes to understanding the importance of measuring and maintaining customer satisfaction as a profitability driver in the banking industry, providing new cross-country evidence. It also contributes to the literature focussing on a group of countries that have not previously been studied.

Details

International Journal of Bank Marketing, vol. 37 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-2323

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Article
Publication date: 16 November 2010

Dimitrios I. Maditinos and Konstantinos Theodoridis

The purpose of this paper is to validate empirically the impact of seven literature‐based constructs on customer satisfaction using a sample from the Greek online shopping context.

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3589

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to validate empirically the impact of seven literature‐based constructs on customer satisfaction using a sample from the Greek online shopping context.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors test a set of hypotheses about the influence that the constructs have on overall satisfaction. Also tested are a set of hypotheses about the satisfaction influence on post‐purchase behaviour.

Findings

The paper argues that product information quality and user interface quality have a significant impact on overall satisfaction, while service information quality, purchasing process, security perception and product attractiveness have only a positive impact. In addition, the findings reveal that customer satisfaction strongly affects post‐purchase behaviour.

Research limitations/implications

The limited Greek respondent “tank” in combination with low internet and technology infusion in Greece, as well as the limited online market in Greece, are the study's main limitations. Common method bias through the use of Likert scales is also considered an important limitation.

Practical implications

The findings indicate some important determinants of customer satisfaction and present a satisfaction index, the score of which is a valid and objective measurement of e‐commerce success.

Originality/value

This paper offers e‐commerce practitioners an objective standard to measure quantitatively the success of a web store as well as a wide frame of reference for researchers to extend e‐commerce research.

Details

Information Technology & People, vol. 23 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-3845

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 2012

M.Y. El‐Bassiouni, M. Madi, T. Zoubeidi and M.Y. Hassan

The purpose of this paper is to develop customer satisfaction indices for the services provided by inspectors in certain departments of Al‐Ain Municipality, the United…

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2503

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to develop customer satisfaction indices for the services provided by inspectors in certain departments of Al‐Ain Municipality, the United Arab Emirates.

Design/methodology/approach

The methodology is based on customer satisfaction models with SERVQUAL survey input to produce indices of satisfaction and the drivers and outcomes of satisfaction. The survey data were collected via a stratified random sample of the customers who visited Al‐Ain Municipality Customer Service Center (AMCSC) in spring 2008. Structural equation models were fitted to the data and goodness‐of‐fit was assessed.

Findings

The customer satisfaction indices and scores of customers’ trust were in the mid‐eighties, indicating high levels of satisfaction and client trust.

Research limitations/implications

The limitations of the current study include the small sample size and the use of one indicator of the latent variable trust. Further research may focus more on prioritizing future efforts, improving quality, and performing cross‐institutional benchmarking.

Practical implications

Opportunities for quality improvements were identified and some recommendations were provided.

Originality/value

Although the results lead to the conclusion that high levels of satisfaction and client trust were attained, there is a room for improvement. The AMCSC has to continuously improve the quality of its services in order to realize its mission.

Details

Journal of Economic and Administrative Sciences, vol. 28 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1026-4116

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2003

Mohamed E. Ibrahim and Ahmed Al Amiri

This paper examined engineers’ satisfaction with services of a building permission unit at a local municipality using a focus group, a questionnaire and follow‐up…

Abstract

This paper examined engineers’ satisfaction with services of a building permission unit at a local municipality using a focus group, a questionnaire and follow‐up interviews. Obtained satisfaction indexes are reported. Differences in satisfaction levels were tested using parametric t‐tests and Kruskal‐Wallis non‐parametric tests according to engineer’s specialization, size of office and number of building projects submitted to the building permission unit. The results indicate no significant statistical differences in satisfaction levels based on specialization (civil engineers versus architectural engineers), size of the consulting office, or the number of projects submitted. However, satisfaction indexes were not high. They were about 60 per cent.

Details

Journal of Economic and Administrative Sciences, vol. 19 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1026-4116

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Article
Publication date: 11 May 2015

Chi-Lu Peng, Kuan-Ling Lai, Maio-Ling Chen and An-Pin Wei

– This study aims to investigate whether and how different sentiments affect the stock market’s reaction to the American Customer Satisfaction Index (ACSI) information.

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3069

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to investigate whether and how different sentiments affect the stock market’s reaction to the American Customer Satisfaction Index (ACSI) information.

Design/methodology/approach

The portfolio approach, with time-varying risk factor loadings and the asset-pricing models, is borrowed from the finance literature to investigate the ACSI-performance relationship. A direct sentiment index is used to examine how investors’ optimistic, neutral and pessimistic sentiments affect the aforementioned relation.

Findings

This paper finds that customer satisfaction is a valuable intangible asset that generates positive abnormal returns. On average, investing in the Strong-ACSI Portfolio is superior to investing in the market index. Even when the stock market holds pessimistic beliefs, investors can beat the market by investing in firms that score well on customer satisfaction. The out-performance of our zero-cost, long–short ACSI strategy also confirms the mispricing of ACSI information in pessimistic periods.

Research limitations/implications

Findings are limited to firms covered by the ACSI data.

Practical implications

Finance research has further documented evidence of the stock market under-reacting to intangible information. For example, firms with higher research and development expenditures, advertising, patent citations and employee satisfaction all earn superior returns. Literature also proves that investors efficiently react to tangible information, whereas they undervalue intangible information. In summary, combining our results and those reported in the literature, customer satisfaction is value-relevant for both investors and firm management, particularly in pessimistic periods.

Originality/value

This study is the first to investigate how sentiment affects the positive ACSI-performance relationship, while considering the time-varying property of risk factors. This study is also the first to show that ACSI plays a more important role during pessimistic periods. This study contributes to the growing literature on the marketing–finance interface by providing better understanding of how investor emotional states affect their perceptions and valuations of customer satisfaction.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 49 no. 5/6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2002

V.K. Khanna, Prem Vrat, Ravi Shankar and B.S. Sahay

Though there has been steady growth in the automobile sector in India, India is still a player of little consequence in global auto production. Despite total quality…

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1838

Abstract

Though there has been steady growth in the automobile sector in India, India is still a player of little consequence in global auto production. Despite total quality management (TQM) playing an increasingly important role in the survival and growth of companies in the automobile sector, the dynamic interactions among its subsystems have not received due attention in the literature. Based on the Malcolm Baldrige National Quality Award model, this paper develops causal relationships among the different variables that represent “enablers” and “results” – operating within 44 identified feedback loops. Of these loops, 33 are positive and 11 are negative. The resulting causal loop diagram provides an insight into understanding the dynamic interactions among TQM subsystems which helps identify proactive action in implementing the TQM philosophy.

Details

Work Study, vol. 51 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0043-8022

Keywords

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