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Article
Publication date: 28 August 2009

N. Gladson Nwokah

The purpose of this paper is to assess the influence of customer focus and competitor focus on marketing performance of food and beverages organizations in Nigeria.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to assess the influence of customer focus and competitor focus on marketing performance of food and beverages organizations in Nigeria.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper adopted an exploratory design‐ six measures of marketing performance is used to capture the customerfocus and competitive‐focus of food and beverages organizations in Nigeria. Data were collected from key informants using a research instrument. Returned instruments were analyzed using regression analysis through the use of statistical package for social sciences (SPSS) version 16.

Findings

The paper validated the existing instruments for measuring customer focus, competitor focus and marketing performance. The paper also finds a strong positive relationship between the three constructs.

Practical implications

Two major implications are identified in this paper, one to scholars on the investigation of the link between customer focus, competitor focus and marketing performance in two different organizations. The second is for managers to be aware of the need for effective assessment of marketing performance measure in line with customer focus and competitor focus. This will no doubt help to provide knowledge and understanding of the reason for and consequences of any particular marketing decision.

Originality/value

The paper significantly refines the body of knowledge concerning the impact of customer focus, competitor focus and marketing performance in the Nigerian context.

Details

Measuring Business Excellence, vol. 13 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1368-3047

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 21 June 2019

Muhammad Sohaib, Umair Akram, Peng Hui, Hassan Rasool, Zohaib Razzaq and Muhammad Kaleem Khan

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the electronic word-of-mouth (eWOM) motivations of regulatory-focused customers with positive and negative consumption experiences.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the electronic word-of-mouth (eWOM) motivations of regulatory-focused customers with positive and negative consumption experiences.

Design/methodology/approach

An online survey is conducted in Beijing and Shanghai. A random sampling technique is used to collect data from 854 respondents. Two scenarios of eWOM communication – positive and negative consumption experiences – are randomly assigned to each respondent. This study employs the structural equation modeling and confirmatory factor analysis techniques. However, it uses ordinary least squares and logistic regression to analyze 137 participants in the experimental study.

Findings

Promotion-focused customers that aim for self-enhancement and obtaining social benefits are motivated to spread positive eWOM on social networking sites. However, prevention-focused customers are driven by vengeance and anxiety, revealing higher intentions to post negative eWOM on review sites. eWOM generation is subject to gender, as promotion-focused male customers spread it more than both prevention-focused and promotion-focused female customers. Moreover, platform assistance (PA) has a significant positive impact upon regulatory-focused customers and eWOM (positive vs negative) relationships.

Practical implications

This study provides a deeper understanding of motivational factors of eWOM communication. Specifically, in case of product or service failure, negative consumption experiences drive prevention-focused customers to generate negative eWOM. Thus, using various tactics, marketers need to shift customers from focusing on prevention to focusing on promotion. For example, redeemable free coupons can shift customer attention and generate positive eWOM.

Originality/value

This study provides unique insights about eWOM motivation across genders. It examines regulatory focus, positive vs negative consumption experiences and moderation of PA.

Details

Asia Pacific Journal of Marketing and Logistics, vol. 32 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-5855

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Article
Publication date: 17 April 2009

Shaohan Cai

The main objective of this paper is to empirically investigate the linkage among organizational customer orientation, customer relationship practices, and organizational outcomes.

Abstract

Purpose

The main objective of this paper is to empirically investigate the linkage among organizational customer orientation, customer relationship practices, and organizational outcomes.

Design/methodology/approach

The sampling frame of the study consists of 143,000 Chinese companies, each with revenue of more than 5 million RMB (Chinese currency). The target companies were randomly selected from 29 Chinese provinces using the stratified probability proportional to sizes (PPS) method. Structure equation modelling was utilized to analyze data.

Findings

It is found that organizational customer orientation affects customer relationship practices, which subsequently influence production performance and customer satisfaction. Production performance and customer satisfaction lead to financial performance.

Research limitations/implications

The study has some limitations that provide directions for future research. Data were only collected from China. Therefore, the research findings might reflect unique aspects of Chinese companies. Caution should be exercised when generalizing these research findings to other nations. The study also focused only on manufacturing firms' customer focus practices.

Practical implications

Companies need to promote customer orientation in their organization, in order to successfully implement customer relationship practices. Only when they effectively utilize the knowledge that they collect to improve production performance can they enhance customer satisfaction and their financial outcomes.

Originality/value

The paper maintains that customer focus practices should consist of two elements: organizational customer orientation and customer relationship practices. This offers new directions to researchers and practitioners for improving customer focus practices.

Details

International Journal of Quality & Reliability Management, vol. 26 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-671X

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Article
Publication date: 27 October 2020

Linda D. Hollebeek, Dale L.G. Smith, Edward Kasabov, Wafa Hammedi, Alexander Warlow and Moira K. Clark

While the customer brand engagement (CBE) research has advanced important insight, most studies to date explore CBE under regular, free-market conditions, yielding an…

Abstract

Purpose

While the customer brand engagement (CBE) research has advanced important insight, most studies to date explore CBE under regular, free-market conditions, yielding an important knowledge gap regarding its manifestation under less regular conditions, including disaster/pandemics. This study, therefore, aims to explore CBE with essential/non-essential service during COVID-19-prompted citizen lockdown.

Design/methodology/approach

Based on a review, the authors develop a framework of lockdown-based CBE with essential/non-essential service interactions, which are conceptualized by their respective capacity to meet differing needs in Maslow’s hierarchy. The authors view lockdown-based essential/non-essential service interactions to differentially impact CBE, as summarized in a set of propositions.

Findings

The framework depicts lockdown-based essential/non-essential service interactions and their respective impact on CBE. The authors propose two essential service modes (i.e. socially distant/platform-mediated interactions) and two non-essential service modes (i.e. service closure/platform-mediated interactions), which the authors hypothesize to differently affect CBE. Moreover, the authors view the associations between our lockdown-based service modes and CBE to be moderated by customers’ regulatory focus (i.e. promotion/prevention), as formalized in the propositions.

Research limitations/implications

Given the authors’ focus on lockdown-based CBE, this paper adds unique insight to the literature. It also raises ample opportunities for further study, as outlined.

Practical implications

This study yields important managerial implications, including the suggested adoption of differing tactics/strategies to leverage promotion/prevention-focused customers’ brand engagement during lockdown.

Originality/value

By exploring the effects of lockdown-based essential/non-essential service modes on promotion/prevention-focused customers’ brand engagement, this paper adds novel insight.

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Article
Publication date: 21 January 2013

Botshabelo Kealesitse, Barry O'Mahony, Beverley Lloyd-Walker and Michael Jay Polonsky

Governmental agencies are interested in improving the quality of their service delivery. One tool that has been used to manage their performance is performance based…

Abstract

Purpose

Governmental agencies are interested in improving the quality of their service delivery. One tool that has been used to manage their performance is performance based reward schemes (PBRS). The aim of this paper is to examine the degree to which a sample of these plans, used within the Botswana public sector, is customer-focused. Being more customer-focused should deliver improved public sector service quality.

Design/methodology/approach

This study carried out an evaluation of a sample of Botswana PBRS plans, using multidimensional content analysis undertaken by four expert “evaluators”, to identify the degree to which the PBRS were customer-focused.

Findings

Classifying PBRS plans as being customer-focused was difficult, as the plans had few objectives related to customer experiences or outcomes. Those that did had poorly defined performance objectives, their targets were not specific, or there was limited explicit role responsibility. Thus, PBRS plans seemed not to focus on improving customer outcomes.

Research limitations/implications

The PBRS evaluated do not appear to be customer-focused and, thus, would have limited ability to improve customer experiences (i.e. public sector quality). Further research is needed in other countries to see whether these results are generalisable, and whether service levels vary with more customer-focused PBRS plans.

Practical implications

The results suggest improvements that could be adopted by organisations seeking to make their PBRS schemes customer-focused.

Originality/value

Extensive research suggests that PBRS plans can be used to improve service quality. Most of the studies have focused on the employees' perspectives and have not looked at the degree of customer orientation within the plans.

Details

International Journal of Public Sector Management, vol. 26 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-3558

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Article
Publication date: 17 July 2007

Bronwen Bartley, Seishi Gomibuchi and Robin Mann

This paper aims: to provide practical insights into how organisations can become more customerfocussed; to share with researchers and organisations a framework that can…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims: to provide practical insights into how organisations can become more customerfocussed; to share with researchers and organisations a framework that can be used to research “customer focus culture” and assess an organisation's level of customer focus; to describe how New Zealand's first consortium approach to benchmarking was managed so that others interested in planning a consortium study can learn from this experience.

Design/methodology/approach

The benchmarking study was conducted by member organisations of the New Zealand Benchmarking Club and facilitated by a doctoral student from Massey University's Centre for Organisational Excellence Research. The methodology involved conducting an extensive literature review to identify national and international best practices in customer focus, developing a survey that was completed by 32 potential best practice organisations, and selecting seven of these organisations for a best practice visit.

Findings

A framework for the examination of customerfocused culture was developed and the findings from the study reveal practical “new” insights into best practices in customer focus.

Research limitations/implications

Benefits would have been gained from extending the study to include a larger international group seeking further examples of good‐to‐best practices.

Practical implications

Insights into how organisations can become customerfocused; a framework that can be used by researchers to research “customer focus culture” and by organisations to assess their level of customer focus; insights into how to run a benchmarking study.

Originality/value

This paper reports on the first consortium approach to benchmarking that has been used within New Zealand; it shares some of the latest best practices in customer focus; a customer focus culture framework has been developed – the first of which the authors are aware.

Details

Benchmarking: An International Journal, vol. 14 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-5771

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Article
Publication date: 14 September 2012

Katy Mason and Stefanos Mouzas

The aim in this paper is to describe and explain the flexibility offered by different business models adopted by different firms as they strive to achieve higher levels of…

Abstract

Purpose

The aim in this paper is to describe and explain the flexibility offered by different business models adopted by different firms as they strive to achieve higher levels of business performance.

Design/methodology/approach

Cross‐sectional research is used to investigate a matched pair sample of 20 high‐performing and 20 low‐performing firms in the UK. The relationship between business model architectures and focus are examined and their implications for flexibility are illustrated and discussed.

Findings

The flexibility offered by different business models is explored through the way organisations select and integrate three inter‐related elements to devise flexible business models, i.e. network influence, transactional relationships, and corporate ownership. Affected by situated practices in each business network and the market position or business size, companies select and integrate various configurations of these elements to respond to the constantly evolving demands of end‐customers.

Research limitations/implications

Although based upon a cross‐sectional analysis of a matched pair sample, the concept of “flexible business models” has far wider managerial implications. The efficiency of the proposed approach is achieved through the reduction into three inter‐related elements that allow flexible configuration and re‐adjustment.

Practical implications

Companies can use the flexible business model approach to examine their own selection and integration of network influence, transactional relationships and corporate ownership and scrutinise their flexibility and performance in the marketplace.

Originality/value

The contribution of this paper is the development of the flexible business models concept, based on an empirical investigation of firms in the UK.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 46 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 2006

N. Gladson Nwokah and Darego W. Maclayton

The purpose of this paper is to assess the impact of customerfocus on the performance of the organisation. While many empirical works have centered on customerfocus, the

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to assess the impact of customerfocus on the performance of the organisation. While many empirical works have centered on customerfocus, the generalisability of its impact on performance of the food and beverages organisations in the Nigeria context has been under‐researched.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper adopted a triangulation methodology (quantitative and qualitative approach). Data were collected from key informants using a research instrument. Returned instruments were analyzed using non‐parametric correlation through the use of the Statistical Package for Social Sciences (SPSS) version 10.

Findings

The paper validated the earlier instruments but did not find any strong association between customerfocus and business performance in the Nigerian context using the food and beverages organisations for the study. The reasons underlying the weak relationship between customerfocus and business performance of the food and beverages organizations are government policies, new product development, diversification, innovation and devaluation of the Nigerian currency. One important finding of this paper is that customerfocus leads to business performance through some moderating variables.

Practical implications

The paper recommends that the Nigerian Government should ensure a stable economy and make economic policies that will enhance existing business development in the country. Also, organisations should have performance measurement systems to detect the impact of investment on customerfocus with the aim of knowing how the organization works.

Originality/value

This paper significantly refines the body of knowledge concerning the impact of customerfocus on the performance of the organization, and thereby offers a model of customerfocus and business performance in the Nigerian context for marketing scholars and practitioners. This model will, no doubt, contribute to the body of existing literature of customerfocus.

Details

Measuring Business Excellence, vol. 10 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1368-3047

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 2004

Yonggui Wang and Hing‐Po Lo

Unlike previous studies which emphasize market oriented performance from the perspective of firms or customers, but mainly internally, the paper proposes that firms should…

Abstract

Unlike previous studies which emphasize market oriented performance from the perspective of firms or customers, but mainly internally, the paper proposes that firms should prioritize customerfocused performance defined totally externally from the perspective of targeted customers, which are the fundamental drivers of purchasing or repurchasing behaviors of customers and consequently the key to successful competition in the customer‐centered era. Then, the role of customerfocused performance in the overall business performance system is examined. After the components and dynamics of customerfocused performance are analyzed, much attention is given to its key determinants in perspective of a resource‐based view, which aims mainly at bridging the current gaps between strategic management and service management. In addition, important propositions are presented and future implications are discussed.

Details

Competitiveness Review: An International Business Journal, vol. 14 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1059-5422

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 26 September 2008

Thomas N. Garavan, John P. Wilson, Christine Cross, Ronan Carbery, Inga Sieben, Andries de Grip, Christer Strandberg, Claire Gubbins, Valerie Shanahan, Carole Hogan, Martin McCracken and Norma Heaton

Utilising data from 18 in‐depth case studies, this study seeks to explore training, development and human resource development (HRD) practices in European call centres. It…

Abstract

Purpose

Utilising data from 18 in‐depth case studies, this study seeks to explore training, development and human resource development (HRD) practices in European call centres. It aims to argue that the complexity and diversity of training, development and HRD practices is best understood by studying the multilayered contexts within which call centres operate. Call centres operate as open systems and training, development and HRD practices are influenced by environmental, strategic, organisational and temporal conditions.

Design/methodology/approach

The study utilised a range of research methods, including in‐depth interviews with multiple stakeholders, documentary analysis and observation. The study was conducted over a two‐year period.

Findings

The results indicate that normative models of HRD are not particularly valuable and that training, development and HRD in call centres is emergent and highly complex.

Originality/value

This study represents one of the first studies to investigate training and development and HRD practices and systems in European call centres.

Details

Journal of European Industrial Training, vol. 32 no. 8/9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0590

Keywords

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