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Article
Publication date: 20 May 2021

Umar Bello Umar, Abdulsalam Mas’ud and Sadisu Abdulazeez Matazu

The study aims to identify a gap within the extant literature on the inadequacy of earlier extension of the theory of reasoned action (TRA) and theory of planned behavior…

Abstract

Purpose

The study aims to identify a gap within the extant literature on the inadequacy of earlier extension of the theory of reasoned action (TRA) and theory of planned behavior (TPB) to accommodate the peculiarity of Muslims majority countries that experiencing poverty growth in modeling the factors influencing the acceptability of Islamic financial products and services. To address this gap, this study expands the aforementioned theories through the integration of customer financial condition through the analyzes of both direct and indirect effects.

Design/methodology/approach

The quantitative research design was deployed through data, which was collected from samples of microentrepreneurs within the agricultural sector of northwestern Nigeria. The data from this sample was analyzed through hierarchical regression analysis.

Findings

The findings confirmed significant direct effects of all the original TPB variables; attitude, subjective norms and perceived behavioral control on acceptance intention of Islamic microfinance. More pioneering, the study established a significant direct negative effect of customer financial condition on the acceptance of Islamic microfinance among agribusiness customers. It further established the indirect (moderating) effects of customer financial condition on the influence of subject norms and perceived behavioral control on acceptance intention of Islamic microfinance, however, such indirect effect was not established in relation to the influence of attitude.

Research limitations/implications

The findings implied that the providers of Islamic financial products and services should target Nigeria’s frontier market as a potential avenue for expanding their existing market share. More specifically, the agricultural sector of northwestern Nigeria could be given focus in such a marketing strategy. In terms of social impact, providing necessary finances to the agricultural sector will further enhance employment creation and reduce poverty in the northwestern region.

Originality/value

Despite several extensions of TRA and TPB in various settings, this could the first study which examined both direct and indirect effects of customer financial condition not only in relation to the acceptance of Islamic microfinance but also all other Islamic financial products and services.

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Article
Publication date: 27 March 2020

Koichi Hioki, Eiichiro Suematsu and Hiroshi Miya

This study aims to investigates the appropriate number and kinds of accounting measures managers should use in their decision-making.

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to investigates the appropriate number and kinds of accounting measures managers should use in their decision-making.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors apply an experimental method with 54 participants who work for a utility company in Japan.

Findings

This study suggests that under information overload, in which many measures are handled simultaneously, managers who have a high Need for Cognition (NFC) can no longer use either financial or customer perspective measures effectively, while when there is no information overload, they can use those measures. Managers with low NFC do not use customer perspective measures even when information overload does not occur.

Practical implications

This study concludes that we need to pay careful attention to differences in managers’ NFC as well as how many and what kind of measures should be provided to managers when designing multi-measures for performance evaluation.

Originality/value

This paper sheds light on the relationships among the number of measures, the characteristics of measures, and managers’ cognitive style when designing a management accounting system.

Details

Pacific Accounting Review, vol. 32 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0114-0582

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Article
Publication date: 12 July 2013

Mark S. Rosenbaum, Carolyn Massiah and Richard Wozniak

This article seeks to illustrate how social commonalities between employees and their customers often result in customers believing that they are entitled to discounts in…

Abstract

Purpose

This article seeks to illustrate how social commonalities between employees and their customers often result in customers believing that they are entitled to discounts in retail settings.

Design/methodology/approach

This study employs survey methodology to reveal the extent to which various social commonalities between customers and service providers encourage customers to believe that they are entitled to financial discounts.

Findings

The findings show that commonalities may cause customers to adhere to narcissism – that is, many customers may expect discounts even when they know that employees may jeopardize their jobs by providing them.

Research limitations/implications

Customer relationships dramatically change with commonalities, as customers believe that social relationships propel them to “best customer status” and that they are entitled to discounts.

Practical implications

Customers who become increasingly connected with employees expect relational benefits that usually require time to develop. Retailers that encourage their employees to develop social media bonds with their customers must realize that customers desire to be financially rewarded for maintaining these linkages.

Originality/value

This work reveals that customers who maintain social commonalities with employees expect to receive some type of financial benefit from doing so.

Details

International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 41 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

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Article
Publication date: 30 May 2008

Robert Karaszewski

The purpose of this paper is the evaluation of largest corporations' position in the world's economy and the influence of basic knowledge elements on building the

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is the evaluation of largest corporations' position in the world's economy and the influence of basic knowledge elements on building the competitive potential of the global business leading corporations. The main objective of this research is to analyze the empirical material obtained from Fortune Global 500 corporations, and the impact of basic knowledge elements on building a company's international competitiveness.

Design/methodology/approach

The research project incorporated surveys and interviews from the Fortune Global 500 corporations (2003 version).

Findings

The findings of the research carried out among the world's business leaders clearly indicate that knowledge management does influence companies' international competitiveness. Functioning in the global economy without efficient management is the same as drifting in a boat with no compass on boundless oceans. However, according to the research outcome, not all knowledge resources are necessary for reaching the purpose. It appears that the key to success is not primarily skilful management of endless knowledge, but the ability of directing activity to those knowledge resources which are critical for the organization's economic operations.

Originality/value

The paper examines the influence of basic knowledge elements on building a competitive potential for a corporation and conditions of management that have an impact on competitiveness.

Details

Journal of Knowledge Management, vol. 12 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1367-3270

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 20 August 2020

Agneta Sundström, Akmal S. Hyder and Ehsanul Huda Chowdhury

The purpose of the study is to identify and analyze critical mediating and moderating market intelligence challenges faced by the SMEs when implementing corporate social…

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1999

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of the study is to identify and analyze critical mediating and moderating market intelligence challenges faced by the SMEs when implementing corporate social responsibility (CSR) based on an applied market-oriented business model (MOBM).

Design/methodology/approach

Focusing on developing CSR-integrated market intelligence, this study uses an action research method by analyzing four case studies. Data is collected through interviews, interactive and knowledge-sharing meetings and on-site observations. The study is part of a larger European Union project using the developed MOBM to follow the four companies' CSR implementation and learning process over a 14-month period. The action research includes seven meetings; between these, the researchers introduced the SMEs to different business focus areas, where CSR is a vital part of the MOBM.

Findings

This study shows that the SMEs are too technology-focused and have little initial idea of how to integrate CSR advantages for market intelligence into their internationalization. The MOBM model offers insights and knowledge on the strength and weakness of the internal organization to meet challenges in internationalization.

Originality/value

Via case study and action research, this study spotlights the challenges that SMEs face in the CSR implementation process and how they deal with those challenges to develop market intelligence competence internally. Instead of following a traditional research approach, the current study applies a CSR-based method where the SMEs go through a knowledge development process that originated from a theoretically designed MOBM.

Details

Baltic Journal of Management, vol. 15 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-5265

Keywords

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Abstract

Subject area

General Management/Strategy.

Study level/applicability

Post-graduate/MBA.

Case overview

Case A: Mr Grandhi Mallikarjuna Rao, founding chairman of GMR, was considering a proposal to bid for an upcoming international airport in Hyderabad, India. The strategic move would have marked GMR’s foray into the Indian airport infrastructure sector. GMR had been involved in the development and operation of power plants and had thrived on public–private partnerships for all its projects. Mr Rao is thinking: Should GMR make another major investment in infrastructure development by bidding to build the airport in Hyderabad, India? Further, how should the organization prepare itself for this strategic move? Case B: On April 4, 2013, the meeting of GMR’s Group Executive Council (GEC) was scheduled to take place. Srinivivas Bommidala, G.M. Rao’s son-in-law and Chairman of GMR’s airports business, was gearing up for the meeting. The meeting was called to discuss a proposal for bidding for an upcoming airport project in the Philippines. It had been more than a decade since GMR entered the airport infrastructure sector. The organization had built substantial airport operating expertise during that period. It adopted a joint venture (JV) model for expanding in the airport infrastructure business. Until now, the organization had always formed JVs for all its airport projects. JVs with existing airport operators were necessitated by the bid conditions that required a certain minimum airport operating experience for qualifying as a bidder for various projects. In some cases, a JV with a local player helped GMR with market knowledge for functioning in a foreign market. GMR also used JVs to access the capabilities it lacked for operating in this sector and gradually learnt from its partners for building capabilities in-house. The group now had the required operating expertise in the sector to qualify as a bidder. One of the key issues the GEC was contemplating was: Whether GMR should continue to form JV for bidding for the upcoming project or should it go solo? Further, if it had to form a JV then, in which areas should it seek a partner?

Expected learning outcomes

Case A: To understand the relationship between key concepts in strategic management, including diversification, capabilities and core competence. To help students understand the various factors managers consider when deciding on the diversification strategy of an organization. To create an understanding of the organizational processes required to facilitate diversification into a new segment. To teach students how to evaluate a potential market opportunity that may require a firm to take on a diversification strategy. Case B: To help students understand how companies use alliances as growth strategies. To understand the rationale for formation of various alliances. To explore various factors managers consider when deciding on alliance strategy of an organization. To understand the challenges associated with using alliances as a strategic option. To understand the pros and cons of internal development (i.e. going solo) vis-à-vis strategic alliances.

Subject code

CSS 11: Strategy.

Details

Emerald Emerging Markets Case Studies, vol. 6 no. 1
Type: Case Study
ISSN: 2045-0621

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1985

D.A. Littler and R.C. Sweeting

Remarks that the importance of innovation is now well recognized in the marketing literature. Argues that radical innovation is still very important to a mature company…

Abstract

Remarks that the importance of innovation is now well recognized in the marketing literature. Argues that radical innovation is still very important to a mature company for the development of new sales. Discusses the details that are important to radical innovation, and proffers an initiative for the development of new business. Analyses the results of empirical studies carried out by UK companies into product innovation. Concludes that organizations should remain sensitive to market demand before embarking on innovation, and that “entrepreneurism” is an important factor, although hard to cultivate in a mature company.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 19 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

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Article
Publication date: 1 July 2002

Kent Knudson

With over 8,400 mutual funds available to U.S. investors, the battle for shelf space has never been more intense. Fund advisers or “manufacturers” are caught in a classic…

Abstract

With over 8,400 mutual funds available to U.S. investors, the battle for shelf space has never been more intense. Fund advisers or “manufacturers” are caught in a classic squeeze by distributors demanding a bigger piece of the revenue pie. In this environment, distributors and investment advisers must deal carefully with the conflicts and SEC concerns that inevitably arise. Financing for fund share distribution, an enormously costly activity, is from three sources: from front‐end and deferred sales charges paid directly by shareholders, from asset‐based sales charges paid by the fund, and from the adviser’s own assets. Reciprocal sales deals should be considered within the context of an adviser’s best‐execution and soft‐dollar policies and procedures. Trading portfolio commissions for fund sales efforts presents conflicts, but the conflicts are manageable if controls are put in place and driven by senior management and legal/compliance staff.

Details

Journal of Investment Compliance, vol. 3 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1528-5812

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Case study
Publication date: 20 January 2017

Paul J. Simko

A senior analyst has recently completed an on-site visit to the Las Vegas properties of MGM Mirage. She must value the enterprise after her preparation of projected…

Abstract

A senior analyst has recently completed an on-site visit to the Las Vegas properties of MGM Mirage. She must value the enterprise after her preparation of projected financial statements. Assumptions for these statements come from a combination of standard account relations delineated in the case and from specific company projections that must be gleaned from MGM's MD&A. This case introduces students to pro forma financial statements and their relevance to cash flow and earnings-based valuation. Tools relevant to spreadsheet modeling can also be introduced. The case precedes MGM's announced acquisition of Mandalay Bay Corporation in 2004.

Details

Darden Business Publishing Cases, vol. 1 no. 1
Type: Case Study
ISSN: 2474-7890
Published by: University of Virginia Darden School Foundation

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Article
Publication date: 20 October 2021

Al Sentot Sudarwanto and Dona Budi Budi Kharisma

The purpose of this paper is two-fold: to explore the legal issue of the importance of personal data protection in the digital economy sector and to propose a legal…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is two-fold: to explore the legal issue of the importance of personal data protection in the digital economy sector and to propose a legal framework for personal data protection as a consumer protection strategy and accelerate the digital economy.

Design/methodology/approach

This study is legal research. The research approach used was the comparative approach and statute approach. The legal materials used are all regulations regarding personal data protection that apply in Indonesia, Hong Kong and Malaysia. The technique of collecting legal materials is done by using library research techniques.

Findings

The value of Indonesia’s digital economy is the biggest in the Southeast Asia region, but data breach is still a big challenge to face. The Indonesian Consumers Foundation (Yayasan Lembaga Konsumen Indonesia) recorded 54 cases of a data breach in e-commerce, 27 cases in peer-to-peer lending and 5 cases in electronic money. Based on the results of a comparative study with Hong Kong and Malaysia, Indonesia has yet no specific Act that comprehensively regulates personal data protection. Indonesia also does not have a personal data protection commission. Criminal sanctions and civil claims related to data breaches have not yet been regulated.

Research limitations/implications

This study examines the data breach problem in the Indonesian digital economy sector. However, the legal construction of personal data protection regulations is built on the results of a comparative study with Hong Kong and Malaysia.

Practical implications

The results of this study can be useful for constructing the ideal regulation regarding the protection of personal data in the digital economy sector.

Social implications

The results of the recommendations in this study are expected to develop and strengthen the protection of personal data in the Indonesian digital economy sector. Besides aiming to prevent the misuse of personal data, the regulation aims to protect consumers and accelerate the growth of the digital economy.

Originality/value

Indonesia needs to create a personal data protection act. The act should at least cover such issues: personal data protection principles; types of personal data; management of personal data; mechanism of personal data protection and security; commission of personal data protection; transfers of personal data; resolution mechanism of personal data dispute and criminal sanctions and civil claims.

Details

Journal of Financial Crime, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-0790

Keywords

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