Search results

1 – 10 of over 67000
To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 12 January 2015

Jason Flores and Arturo Z. Vasquez-Parraga

This study’s aim is to investigate whether offering a co-production opportunity as a choice or as the only means of service rendering influences customer value creation…

Abstract

Purpose

This study’s aim is to investigate whether offering a co-production opportunity as a choice or as the only means of service rendering influences customer value creation and satisfaction. This research incorporates two empirically supported sources of co-created value, relational and economic, and it investigates a new dimension of co-created value, individual value. The study focus supports the need for more empirically based guidance for the management and design of co-creation processes.

Design/methodology/approach

A 2 × 2 between-subjects experimental design was utilized to test the choice/no-choice condition. Data were collected through a survey of 214 respondents who were selected on the basis of their familiarity with the context of the experimental scenarios.

Findings

The results show that co-production as an option for service rendering has a stronger positive impact on value creation than does the context when co-production is necessary. Choice was found to positively influence relational and economic value. Value creation was found to mediate the choice and satisfaction relationship. Individual value had the strongest relative impact on satisfaction but was not significantly related to choice.

Practical implications

Designers and managers of co-production-enabling processes can enhance customer and organizational outcomes simply by offering customers a choice when considering whether or not to engage in co-production.

Originality/value

This originality of this study lies in the supporting evidence found for the influence of choice on value creation and the empirical corroboration for individual value creation as a source of co-created value. The on-line context of this study in this context is also novel.

Details

Journal of Consumer Marketing, vol. 32 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0736-3761

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 September 1999

Rohit Verma and Gary M. Thompson

This article presents the results of a study using discrete choice analysis (DCA) in the dine‐in pizza industry. DCA offers an effective approach for incorporating customer

Abstract

This article presents the results of a study using discrete choice analysis (DCA) in the dine‐in pizza industry. DCA offers an effective approach for incorporating customer preferences into operating decisions in service businesses. Our results show how customers tradeoff among several determinant attributes (e.g. price, waiting time, quality) when choosing a dine‐in pizza restaurant. The article also offers evidence that managers’ perceptions of customer choice patterns are not the same as customers’ actual choice patterns for the businesses we examined. Finally, we show how our results can be easily incorporated into a decision support system for structuring service operations according to customer preferences.

Details

International Journal of Operations & Production Management, vol. 19 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3577

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 29 November 2018

Michael Christofi, Demetris Vrontis, Erasmia Leonidou and Alkis Thrassou

The purpose of this paper is to construct a conceptual framework of the effects of customer engagement on cause-related marketing (CRM), with the goal of providing a solid…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to construct a conceptual framework of the effects of customer engagement on cause-related marketing (CRM), with the goal of providing a solid scientific foundation for the development and stimulation of future research on the critical intersection of these two topics.

Design/methodology/approach

The research defines customer engagement in CRM campaigns as the conditions under which consumers are allowed to choose the cause that receives the donation, the cause proximity (geographical proximity) and the type of donation in a CRM campaign.

Findings

The paper conceptualizes the role of customer engagement in enhancing the effectiveness of a CRM campaign, in terms of coverage, customization and reduced consumer skepticism, as well as in triggering positive word-of-mouth (WOM) persuasion behaviors.

Practical implications

The conceptual framework provides several practicable directions toward effective control of CRM campaign outcomes, for both local and global firms.

Originality/value

The paper rests on established empirical foundations to develop a comprehensive preliminary multi- disciplinary framework on the subject, setting the path for further research in the fields of CRM, customer engagement and International Business Research, and reaching findings of both scholarly and executive worth.

Details

International Marketing Review, vol. 37 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-1335

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 August 2005

Anna S. Mattila and David Cranage

The paper proposes introducing a new antecedent to service recovery – that is customers' choice over some components of the service delivery process. The authors also…

Abstract

Purpose

The paper proposes introducing a new antecedent to service recovery – that is customers' choice over some components of the service delivery process. The authors also examined the interactive effects of tangible compensation and apology on perceived fairness in a context of restaurant services.

Design/methodology/approach

A 2 (choice) × 2 (compensation) × 2 (apology) between‐subjects design was used to test the hypotheses. Subjects were exposed to a written scenario describing a restaurant experience. A total of 280 undergraduate students served as the subject pool.

Findings

The study results indicate that choice, compensation and apology jointly influence customers' perceptions of informational fairness. The combined effects of apology and compensation were observed for interactional fairness, whereas only main effects were found for distributive justice. Finally, the findings suggest that the four facets of justice (distributive, procedural, interactive, and informational) are highly linked to post‐recovery satisfaction.

Research limitations/implications

Several limitations regarding this research should be kept in mind. First, students served as the sample pool for this investigation. Although the choice of students somewhat limits the generalizability of the results, the behaviors and responses of students and other market segments are likely to be more similar than different in service recovery incidents. Second, the manipulations involved absence and presence of three service recovery attributes (choice/no choice; compensation/no compensation, and apology/no apology). Consequently, different levels of these attributes might produce differential responses.

Practical implications

The findings of this study highlight the benefits of a proactive management of the service recovery process.

Originality/value

This research sheds some light on the role of choice in customer perceptions of service recovery processes. It also introduces a fourth dimension of justice – informational justice – to the service recovery literature.

Details

Journal of Services Marketing, vol. 19 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0887-6045

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 24 October 2017

Antonia Estrella-Ramón

This paper aims to examine the impact of the customer’s previous transaction behaviour (represented by loyalty and general cross-buying) on his/her choice of specific…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examine the impact of the customer’s previous transaction behaviour (represented by loyalty and general cross-buying) on his/her choice of specific services offered by the same financial services provider.

Design/methodology/approach

This study uses a set of logistic regression models by incorporating panel data from a large bank. The database consists of 2,187 randomly selected customers, and it includes features related to individual loyalty and cross-buying behaviours, as well as demographic indicators, i.e. individual measures related to each customer and each service.

Findings

From the results obtained, a large variation in customer choice behaviour with regard to the studied banking services was observed. These results reveal which customer transactional behaviours drive cross-category financial services purchases.

Originality/value

In academic literature, little progress has been made in the study of individual and behavioural factors that affect customer choices by service category, especially within the banking sector. By understanding customer choices, the company will be able to meet customer needs in a more appropriate way, thereby increasing its competitiveness. Hence, the results from this study have both managerial and research implications, improving the strategy formulation of financial services companies.

Details

Journal of Services Marketing, vol. 31 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0887-6045

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 July 2006

Constantine Lymperopoulos, Ioannis E. Chaniotakis and Magdalini Soureli

This project aims to offer an in‐depth understanding of bank customers' buying behaviour in relation to the selection process, and provide bank managers with useful…

Abstract

Purpose

This project aims to offer an in‐depth understanding of bank customers' buying behaviour in relation to the selection process, and provide bank managers with useful insight into the development of high quality relationships with customers.

Design/methodology/approach

The research involved a review of available literature on bank choice criteria, the fieldwork, the identification of factors that affect customers' choice, and the development of related managerial implications. A research questionnaire was administered by personal interviews to 1,092 bank customers in the greater area of Athens.

Findings

Four distinct factors were identified as the main choice criteria that influence consumers' bank choice. Bank service quality is the most important element that customers consider in order to select their mortgage providers and establish a long‐term relationship with them. The other three refer to product attributes, access, and communication.

Research limitations/implications

Limitations relate to the use of non‐probability sample and the restricted geographical area of the field research. This study contributes to the body of academic knowledge by shedding more light into the role of service quality in the selection process of mortgage provider.

Practical implications

An understanding of consumer buying behaviour with respect to mortgage loans is important to bank managers for the attainment of organisational objectives that are focused on building beneficial customer relationships. Management guidelines for improving service quality are presented.

Originality/value

The paper manages to identify the perceived important characteristics of banks and particularly highlight the role of service quality in bank selection for mortgages and further development of long‐term relationships.

Details

Managing Service Quality: An International Journal, vol. 16 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0960-4529

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 April 2000

Michael J. Dorsch, Stephen J. Grove and William R. Darden

Even though service marketers are interested in influencing customer choice at the service provider level (i.e. the service brand level), the decision to patronize a…

Abstract

Even though service marketers are interested in influencing customer choice at the service provider level (i.e. the service brand level), the decision to patronize a particular service firm seldom occurs until after the customer decides to use a service provider in the first place. Ultimately, this initial “make‐or‐buy” purchase decision – the decision to use a service category – restrains customer decisions at the service provider (brand) level. To enhance our understanding of customers’ service category decisions, a double cross‐validation approach was employed to investigate the applicability of a service category choice model which we adapted from Howard’s work on consumer decision making. Our model, which was tested with two different service categories, was supported.

Details

Journal of Services Marketing, vol. 14 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0887-6045

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 14 September 2015

Beibei Dong

This paper aims to conceptually and empirically differentiate between two types of customer participation (CP): CP as “producers” (CPP), when customers primarily…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to conceptually and empirically differentiate between two types of customer participation (CP): CP as “producers” (CPP), when customers primarily contribute physical labor to produce a service (e.g. assembling a frame), and CP as “designers” (CPD), when customers primarily share information to design a service (e.g. designing a frame). The study examines whether CPD and CPP influence customers’ perceptions of value creation and choice of participation differently. Furthermore, it investigates the moderating effect of customer expectation on the effect of CPD/CPP on customers’ participation responses.

Design/methodology/approach

This study uses two scenario-based experiments. Study 1 examines the main effect of CPP and CPD on perceived value of participation and participation choice, and Study 2 investigates the moderator of customer expectation.

Findings

Study 1 indicates that CPD creates greater value and is a more preferred participation choice than CPP. Study 2 further suggests that the differential advantage of CPD over CPP becomes weakened with a CPP expectation and amplified with a CPD expectation.

Research limitations/implications

This research helps reconcile current mixed empirical findings in the literature and opens up a new stream to enrich the theoretical understanding of CP. Its use of consumer psychology theories also adds a consumer psychological perspective to CP research.

Practical implications

This research demonstrates that not all CPs are equal, offers guidelines to design and manage CP and suggests managing customer expectations so as to enhance the appeal of CPP in light of its productivity implications.

Originality/value

This study represents a pioneering work to empirically differentiate two types of CP and offers a new perspective for understanding the complexity of CP.

Details

Journal of Services Marketing, vol. 29 no. 6/7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0887-6045

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 December 2005

Liana Victorino, Rohit Verma, Gerhard Plaschka and Chekitan Dev

The purpose of this paper is to understand the impact service innovation has on customers' choices within the hotel and leisure industry. The paper also discusses the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to understand the impact service innovation has on customers' choices within the hotel and leisure industry. The paper also discusses the influence of the creation of new services on both service development and operational strategy.

Design/methodology/approach

The analysis is based on a national survey of approximately 1,000 travelers in the United States, using a web‐based data acquisition approach. The travelers are segmented by reason of travel (business or leisure), and discrete choice analysis is applied to model customer preferences for various hotel service innovations.

Findings

Overall, the study finds that service innovation does matter when guests are selecting a hotel, with type of lodging having the largest impact on a customer's hotel choice. In addition, service innovation is found to have a larger influence on choices when guests are staying at economy hotels rather than mid‐range to up‐scale hotels. Also, leisure travelers were found to be more influenced by innovative amenities such as childcare programs and in‐room kitchenettes than business travelers.

Practical implications

The understanding of customers' choices allows managers to better design their service offerings and formulate corresponding operational strategies around customer needs.

Originality/value

This paper examines the addition of innovation to the hotel service concept and is an excellent tool for managers deciding on which innovations to implement.

Details

Managing Service Quality: An International Journal, vol. 15 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0960-4529

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 13 August 2012

Robert Gallicano, Robert J. Blomme and Arjan van Rheede

Previous research has concluded that there is consumer desire for nutrition information to be provided on restaurant menu items and restaurant customers presented with…

Abstract

Previous research has concluded that there is consumer desire for nutrition information to be provided on restaurant menu items and restaurant customers presented with this information will make healthier menu choices (Mills & Thomas, 2008). Limited research has been performed in a restaurant setting measuring real rather than intended behavior. The purpose of this research experiment is to measure consumer response, in a full-service restaurant setting, to nutrition information on menu items and subsequently determine if consumers will use this information in their menu item choice. An experiment was conducted with 264 restaurant customers at a full-service a la carte restaurant. Customers chose from menu items labeled with or without a Healthy Choice® label. A logistic regression model was used to predict whether people would choose Healthy Choice menu items. Fifty-four percent of restaurant customers chose the healthy choice menu item. The logistic regression confirms that those people who desire nutrition information also use this information in their menu choice. The study concludes with recommendations for the industry on directing consumer menu choice toward healthier items.

Details

Advances in Hospitality and Leisure
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78052-936-3

Keywords

1 – 10 of over 67000