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Article
Publication date: 31 May 2021

Lijie Zhou and Fei Xue

This paper aims to examine the effects of visual themes and view perspectives on users’ visual attention to brand posts on Instagram. The impact of visual attention on…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examine the effects of visual themes and view perspectives on users’ visual attention to brand posts on Instagram. The impact of visual attention on brand attitude and recognition is also explored.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors conducted a 4 (visual themes: customer-centric, employee-centric, product-centric and symbolic visuals) × 2 (view perspectives: first-person view vs third-person view) between-subject factorial eye-tracking experiment to explore their effects on viewers’ visual attention (fixation frequency and fixation duration), attitude toward the brand and brand recognition.

Findings

Results showed that, under a first-person view, participants spent the longest time viewing customer-centric images and paid the most attention to product-centric and customer-centric images. For images in the third-person view, product-centric images received the longest fixation duration and highest fixation frequency. Customer-centric image and product-centric image generated significantly higher amount of fixation duration and fixation frequency than the symbolic image, regardless of view perspective. Brand recognition was positively influenced by fixation frequency but not by fixation duration.

Originality/value

This study is an extended application of Aaker’s (1996) brand identity planning model in visual branding on Instagram. As the findings indicated, the effective use of visual strategies could lead to more positive responses toward the brand. By understanding how optical elements stimulate visual branding processing, marketing professionals will be able to improve information designing skills in visual-based social media platforms (such as Instagram).

Details

Journal of Research in Interactive Marketing, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-7122

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Article
Publication date: 30 October 2018

Elisa Martina Martinelli and Annalisa Tunisini

The purpose of this paper is to explore the topic of customer integration into supply chains. Particular attention is focused on literature concerning customer-driven and…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the topic of customer integration into supply chains. Particular attention is focused on literature concerning customer-driven and customer-centric supply chains. The aim is to provide a deeper understanding of these two approaches, clarify the differences, compare them and provide a conceptual model and research propositions, leading to theoretical and managerial implications.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper presents a systematic literature review conducted using a consolidated methodology. The protocol used allows for the identification, analysis, synthesis, reporting and discussion of the results stemming from the literature on customer integration into the supply chain. This analysis enables us to summarize the results in a conceptual framework and introduce new research propositions.

Findings

Using the results of the literature review, the authors first systematized the literature on customer-driven supply chain and on customer-centric supply chain in the conceptual framework. For each of the two sets of studies, the authors highlighted three main streams of research concerning customer integration into the supply chain. The authors analyzed three different topics: why customer integration is needed, how customer integration takes place and which intra-organizational issues are necessary to implement customer integration into the supply chain. Second, the authors developed a conceptual framework to confront customer-driven and customer-centric approaches to supply chain management in an evolutionary perspective. The authors thus formulated research propositions aimed at entering in greater depth the management of the shift from the customer-driven to customer-centric supply chain.

Research limitations/implications

The systematic literature analysis developed in the paper contributed to more integrated and comprehensive knowledge of customer integration into the supply chain. The paper identifies and describes the characteristics of different supply chain approaches through the organization and interpretation of academics’ contributions. The paper suggests the need for further research in at least three areas: the study of variables supporting customer-driven or customer-centric approaches, the relevant intra-organizational issues underscoring the customer-centric supply chain and the impact of digitalization on supply chain processes.

Practical implications

The paper outlines the main structural elements that compose the customer-driven and customer-centric supply chains. The results of the systematic analysis of the literature can be used to inform managers about the different levels and approaches for achieving customer integration. These diverse configurations of customer integration imply administrative and organizational considerations. Major issues to be considered when managers want to integrate the customer into the supply chain are identified. In addition, conditions underscoring different options – namely, customer-driven and customer-centric supply chains – are provided.

Originality/value

The originality of this work lies in the systematic review of literature examining customer integration into supply chains, which highlights two main levels of customer integration: customer-driven and customer-centric. The main contribution is the formulation of a conceptual framework and new research propositions from the comparison and merger of these two configurations. The information presented in this paper enhances the literature on recent developments in customer integration, thereby enabling managers to select the most suitable configuration for the supply chain structure.

Details

Journal of Business & Industrial Marketing, vol. 34 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0885-8624

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Article
Publication date: 15 November 2011

Liem Viet Ngo and Aron O'Cass

The purpose of this paper is to adopt a customercentric value creation perspective to provide insights into the contribution of business orientations, especially…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to adopt a customercentric value creation perspective to provide insights into the contribution of business orientations, especially marketing orientation and innovation orientation to the creation of customercentric value (customer equity and brand performance).

Design/methodology/approach

To undertake this examination, a model was developed and then tested to validate its applicability in the context of both developed and developing economies. The paper includes partial least squares.

Findings

The findings demonstrate that being marketing‐oriented and innovation‐oriented appears to be important in creating customers, keeping them, and increasing add‐on selling to them and rewards the firm with greater brand performance in the marketplace. Importantly, these relationships are universally held across developed and developing business environments. Interestingly, marketing orientation was found to contribute more to the creation of customercentric value than innovation orientation in developing business environment, whereas the opposite was found in the context of developed business environment.

Research limitations/implications

The data incorporate only the subjective measures of customercentric value. Future studies can use financial measures to complement the self‐reporting approach used in this paper. This dual‐approach to measuring the value of customers to the firm (customer equity) and brand performance would provide additional insights into the customercentric marketing literature.

Practical implications

The findings suggest that managers should strive to develop a high level of marketing orientation and innovation orientation as two efficient ways to achieve higher levels of customer equity. They are also advised that if their firms are more effective in acquiring potential customers, retaining current customers, and enhancing add‐on selling, they see their brands perform better. Importantly, the findings also provide guidance for managers on how to allocate their resources to key business activities (e.g. marketing and innovation) in the context of international business (developing versus developed business environments).

Originality/value

This study contributes to customercentric marketing theory by enhancing understanding of the contribution of marketing and innovation to the creation of customercentric value in different business environments. This study also contributes to the business orientation literature by demonstrating the utility of a cultural‐behavioral approach in measuring marketing orientation and innovation orientation.

Details

Asia Pacific Journal of Marketing and Logistics, vol. 23 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-5855

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Article
Publication date: 21 September 2010

Malcolm Smith and Chen Chang

Owing to the sharp refocus among Taiwanese companies away from a product‐centric approach towards a customercentric approach, many companies have invested heavily in…

Abstract

Purpose

Owing to the sharp refocus among Taiwanese companies away from a product‐centric approach towards a customercentric approach, many companies have invested heavily in customer relationship management (CRM) systems. The purpose of this paper is to investigate whether such an investment generates the anticipated benefits.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper uses survey methods among public companies in Taiwan to examine the degree to which CRM implementation impacts upon customer satisfaction and customer loyalty.

Findings

Firms which pay more attention to a customercentric approach can benefit significantly from the implementation of CRM systems. There were no differences in the degree or focus of implementation attributable to industry differences.

Research limitations/implications

The results are subject to the normal limitations associated with survey research, and may not be generalisable outside Taiwan.

Practical implications

The paper has significant implications for management decision making in terms of the disposal of resources to pursue customer‐related strategies.

Originality/value

The paper has significant practical implications for companies in Taiwan.

Details

Asian Review of Accounting, vol. 18 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1321-7348

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Article
Publication date: 24 February 2020

Thuy T. Dang and Anh D. Pham

While technological advances have been changing the way that services are delivered to customers, direct interaction between banks’ front-line staff and customers still…

Abstract

Purpose

While technological advances have been changing the way that services are delivered to customers, direct interaction between banks’ front-line staff and customers still holds its distinct position in the banking sector. This research investigates the relationship between interactional justice and the willingness of commercial banks’ front-line staff to engage in customer-centric behaviors, as well as the mediators behind this relationship.

Design/methodology/approach

This research combined both qualitative and quantitative research methods. In-depth interviews were employed to explore the potential mechanisms underlying the relationship between interactional justice and customer-centric behavior and to develop the specific measurement scale for customer-centric behavior in the banking service context. A survey was conducted to test the conceptual model using a sample of 312 customer contact employees working in Vietnamese commercial banks.

Findings

The research results indicate that interactional justice significantly enhances employees’ willingness to engage in customer-centric behaviors, and this relationship is partially mediated by overall job satisfaction and the leader-member exchange relationship.

Research limitations/implications

This research faces several limitations. The first limitation concerns the fact that the data are based on self-reports, which might lead to common method biases. Second, this study used a sample drawn from the North of Vietnam only. Third, this study adopted a limited set of measurement items due to the concerns of model parsimony and data collection efficiency. Fourth, we followed prior justice work to assume the linear relationship between interactional justice and leader-member exchange, in which the leader-member exchange is hypothesized to be the outcome of fair treatment (Erdogan and Liden, 2006; Masterson et al., 2000). Last, we only considered how leaders treat their followers through the lens of interactional justice, while interactional justice differentiation has also been affirmed as a crucial determinant of leader-member exchange and employees’ performance.

Originality/value

This research is noteworthy that it is the first to take a social exchange perspective to examine customer-oriented behavior as an outcome of interpersonal interactions in the workplace. Accordingly, it delivers a key message to bank supervisors: “Treat employees the way you want your customers to be treated.”

Details

International Journal of Bank Marketing, vol. 38 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-2323

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Article
Publication date: 22 March 2013

Mamunur Rashid, Islam Abdeljawad, Siti Manisah Ngalim and M. Kabir Hassan

The purpose of this paper is to investigate customercentric corporate social responsibility (CSR) in Islamic banks of Bangladesh, Malaysia and the Arabian Gulf Region…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate customercentric corporate social responsibility (CSR) in Islamic banks of Bangladesh, Malaysia and the Arabian Gulf Region. The new framework is found from the incomplete link between managerial motivation and their actual involvement with CSR activities.

Design/methodology/approach

The study uses annual reports of 16 Islamic banks from three regions. Using content analysis method, the study produces an ethical identity index on eight dimensions. The average index scores are ranked to get a view of the importance given by Islamic banks to the path of social responsibility.

Findings

In this study, the customercentric CSR framework assumes that there are two layers of CSR involvement in Islamic banks. The upper layer assures the commitment towards Allah (SWT) by operating under Islamic Shari'ah. The bottom layer ensures the commitment towards customers, employees and society. The reports of Islamic banks show that the selected banks are too customer centric and efficiency driven. However, that efficiency is targeted at the cost of sacrificing Shari'ah norms. Their commitments to basic Islamic rules fall far behind the average.

Research limitations/implications

The study uses content analysis of the annual report to identify CSR involvement of the Islamic banks. There are various issues related to CSR and corporate management that are not reported in annual reports. Moreover, disclosure norms and regulation also have an influence on reporting standards. Thus, this study is limited to what is found in the reports only.

Originality/value

The study contributes to the existing literature on customercentric CSR and customercentric marketing. There is evidence that the findings from this study are consistent with other studies. Islamic banks are becoming customer centric because of the competition from conventional banks. However, they must not forget the very essence of the establishment of these banks which is the spiritual freedom based upon sole submission to Allah (SWT).

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Article
Publication date: 12 July 2013

Christos Sarmaniotis, Costas Assimakopoulos and Eugenia Papaioannou

Valid measurement scales for predicting the adoption of hoteliers’ customercentric orientation are in short supply. The present research develops and validates a new…

Abstract

Purpose

Valid measurement scales for predicting the adoption of hoteliers’ customercentric orientation are in short supply. The present research develops and validates a new scale for a specific variable, i.e. Management Attitudes Towards CustomerCentric Orientation (MATCCO). Furthermore, this research attempts to identify some broad determinants for a successful CRM system implementation and propose a research model depicting possible relationships among MATCCO, broad determinants and profit.

Design/methodology/approach

A structured questionnaire has been developed in order to accomplish the research objectives. Data were collected from 86 Greek luxury hotels. Accepted methodology was used to construct the measure, factor analysis to determine the CRM key success factors (KSFs) and Pearson correlation, ANOVA and discriminant analysis to test the proposed model. Additionally, qualitative research was conducted in two Greek luxury hotels.

Findings

A reliable and valid measure of MATCCO was constructed. Four CRM KSFs were identified. The research model was verified and proposed confirming relationships among MATCCO, CRM KSFs and company profit. Cases analysis showed that effective customer communication strategy, IT infrastructure and suitable organizational strategy are the KSFs of CRM implementation provided that hoteliers are positive toward customercentric orientation.

Research limitations/implications

The results of this study are applicable to luxury hotels.

Practical implications

There is a necessity of checking the level of MATCCO before undertaking a CRM implementation project. Further, the results of this study highlight some crucial factors that influence successful CRM implementation in the hotel lodgings.

Originality/value

The main contribution of the paper is the construction of the multi‐item measure of hoteliers’ customercentric orientation.

Details

EuroMed Journal of Business, vol. 8 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1450-2194

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Article
Publication date: 9 February 2010

Steven H. Appelbaum, Seyed Mahmoud Zinati, Andrew MacDonald and Yusef Amiri

The purpose of this case study is to identify areas of weakness in the patient‐centric organizational culture of Baylis Medical Company in Montreal, and to propose…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this case study is to identify areas of weakness in the patient‐centric organizational culture of Baylis Medical Company in Montreal, and to propose specific actions to address these deficiencies.

Design/methodology/approach

Following initial interviews with company management and observations of corporate environment, variations in organizational culture are measured using a company‐wide survey designed to evaluate customer satisfaction, accountability, empowerment, results focus and employee satisfaction. Survey data are analyzed across departments and experience levels.

Findings

Qualitative assessment of the company via interviews and observations revealed a lack of artifacts relating to organizational culture, no formal feedback channels from clients, and a diversity of corporate visions among management and employees. Survey analysis revealed lower organizational culture valuation among less experienced employees and non‐managerial workers. Specific areas of weakness include accountability, empowerment and results focus in non‐manufacturing employees.

Research limitations/implications

The qualitative assessment was limited to selected interviews. No visit was made to the Toronto office. No interviews or surveys were conducted with clients. No data are available to evaluate fluctuations in organizational culture over time.

Practical implications

Four alternative action plans are evaluated using specific decision criteria. The introduction of artifacts relating to the patient‐centric organizational culture is recommended in the short term. Long‐term recommendations include the development of client‐oriented key performance indicators for management and employee use, and a multi‐step training program describing the clinical importance of the company products.

Originality/value

This study proposes a novel model to evaluate the level of patient‐centricity in an organizational culture. Specific recommendations may apply across a variety of industries, but are especially applicable in health care delivery sectors.

Details

Leadership in Health Services, vol. 23 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1751-1879

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Article
Publication date: 19 October 2015

Nedra Bahri-Ammari and Khaldoon Nusair

This study aims to show the contribution of the determinants of customer relationship management (CRM), namely, customer-centric organizational culture and customer-centric

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to show the contribution of the determinants of customer relationship management (CRM), namely, customer-centric organizational culture and customer-centric management system, in explaining CRM performance. The moderating role of employee support has also been examined.

Design/methodology/approach

A questionnaire was administered to 406 CRM users in 15 four- and five-star hotels in Tunisia. Data were analyzed using structural equation modeling.

Findings

The results show that a consumer-centric managerial system positively affects CRM technology. Managerial system contributes to have an efficient CRM technology implemented that provides sales force with customer information, competitor information, leads for cross-sell/up-sell opportunities, tracks product availability and measures customer loyalty. These dimensions are negatively affected by a consumer-centric organizational culture. CRM technology once implemented with an adapted consumer-centric vision will enhance the CRM performance. Moreover, the use of CRM technology by employees leads to higher performance. CRM performance can improve when different CRM components are used and supported by employee. Exchange of relevant information that provides technology can improve in regaining lost customers, in acquiring customers and in improving the total return per customer and reducing customer migration.

Practical implications

The findings help managers to consider adopting a customer-oriented CRM strategy that considers all the variables that may affect the performance of this technology (initiation, maintenance and retention). Companies will be able to reconsider some notions related to CRM strategies: restructuring the human factor, disseminating information, changing hotel culture and training of users.

Originality/value

This study is the first to explain CRM performance in Tunisian hotels. It helps to highlight the importance of the visitors’ behavior in hotels, which explains, among other things, the difficulty of maintaining long-lasting relationship with hotel guests, despite a good system management and a good customer-centric culture.

Details

Journal of Hospitality and Tourism Technology, vol. 6 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-9880

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Article
Publication date: 11 November 2020

Hendar Hendar, Moch. Zulfa, Alifah Ratnawati and Mulyana Mulyana

The purpose of this paper is to investigate and test the role of religio-centric product strategy (RPS) in mediating the relationship among marketing innovativeness (MI)…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate and test the role of religio-centric product strategy (RPS) in mediating the relationship among marketing innovativeness (MI), market sensing capability (MSC), customer relationship management capability (CRMC) and brand management capability (BMC) with marketing performance (MP) in a religious-based industry. This is in accordance with the conditions of Indonesian religious people and the increasing demand for Muslim fashion products.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper selected 330 small fashion businesses in Indonesia and tested the regressive relations of the 6 constructs.

Findings

The findings showed that MI, MSC, CRMC and BMC have a positive effect on RPS and RPS also has a positive effect on MP, so that RPS acts as mediation in the relationship among MI, MSC, CRMC and BMC with MP.

Research limitations/implications

In-depth research on other dimensions of the role of antecedent variable of RPS, such as NPD capability, specialized marketing capability, resource reconfiguration marketing capability, architectural marketing capability and marketing resources that are interesting to discuss (Morgan, 2012), has not been done in research.

Originality/value

By examining the literature on dynamic capability, marketing strategy, entrepreneurship and business performance, this paper offers a unique analysis of dynamic marketing capability and its impact on product strategy and MP in religious-based industries.

Details

Journal of Research in Marketing and Entrepreneurship, vol. 22 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1471-5201

Keywords

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