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Publication date: 20 May 2019

Haitham Nakhleh

The aim of this chapter is to investigate factors affecting four of the gaps encompassed in the GAP model, which then results in Gap 5, the so-called customer gap, related…

Abstract

The aim of this chapter is to investigate factors affecting four of the gaps encompassed in the GAP model, which then results in Gap 5, the so-called customer gap, related to the variance between customer expectations and the perception of service quality (SQ). Four predictors were selected based on the literature review – marketing research orientation (MRO), service specification design (SSD), integrated technology (ITC) and integrated communication (ICO) – to examine their relationship with the customer gap. A valid and reliable questionnaire, developed for the purpose of the study, was used to collect data from a sample consisting of 600 employees from six hotels located in Amman, Jordan. The findings show that MRO, SSD, ITC and ICO significantly predict the four gaps in SQ on the provider side, which in turn significantly predict the customer gap. For companies, more attention should be paid to the four gaps that induce the customer gap.

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Research in Corporate and Shari’ah Governance in the Muslim World: Theory and Practice
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78973-007-4

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 1989

Richard Lancioni and Myroslaw J. Kyj

Customer service has long been recognised as the output of anorganisation′s logistics effort. There is some evidence that suggeststhat the types and levels of customer

Abstract

Customer service has long been recognised as the output of an organisation′s logistics effort. There is some evidence that suggests that the types and levels of customer service desired are contingent on a particular industry or position within the marketing channel. Most of these investigations, however, have emphasised only regional or national relationships. Logistics by its very nature has a significant international orientation and therefore it is necessary to understand the role of customer service from an international perspective. However, it is not clear whether an international customer service policy is feasible or for that matter even desirable. This article develops a framework for studying customer service across national boundaries. While it may be desirable to print warranties in local languages, measurable factors such as average delivery time and product tracing retain their traditional importance.

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International Journal of Physical Distribution & Materials Management, vol. 19 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0269-8218

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 1995

Peter Jones

Groonroos (1990) notes that in the traditional literature on marketing the concept ‘marketing management’ is used to describe the practical applications of marketing and…

Abstract

Groonroos (1990) notes that in the traditional literature on marketing the concept ‘marketing management’ is used to describe the practical applications of marketing and he suggests that this is perfectly appropriate in the case of consumer goods. However, he goes on to argue that in a service context the whole organisation has to be supportive to marketing and he concludes that marketing is an integral part of any theory of service management. One of the central themes in the rapidly growing services marketing and management literature (Berry and Parasuraman 1993) is the nature of the interactions and relationships between the service provider's personnel and the customer. Such a theme has been defined in a variety of ways. There has been considerable interest, for example, in the ‘Service Encounter’ or ‘Moment of Truth’ (Carlzon 1987) i.e., in the direct face‐to‐face contacts between the customer and the employers of the service firm whilst Solomon et.al., (1985) argue that this encounter has a major impact on service differentiation, quality control, delivery systems and customer satisfaction. Gronroos (1990) takes a longer term view in developing a relationship definition of marketing as being concerned “to establish, maintain and enhance relationships with customers … at a profit so that the objectives of the parties are met” (p.138). Bateson (1989) recognises the importance of the service encounter but also stresses that the non face‐to‐face interactions and the quality of the service environment must also be considered. This leads him to suggest that any conceptualisation of services marketing should include all kinds of possible interactions and that consideration should also be given to the ‘service experience’ rather than just to the service encounter.

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Management Research News, vol. 18 no. 12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0140-9174

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Article
Publication date: 9 January 2007

Hong Miao and Mia Wang Bassham

The purpose of this paper is to explore the concept of customer service and outline the practices and conditions required to provide excellent customer service in libraries.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the concept of customer service and outline the practices and conditions required to provide excellent customer service in libraries.

Design/methodology/approach

The concept of service being at the core of the library profession and the role of libraries to lifelong learning are reiterated to emphasize the importance of quality customer service in libraries. The three‐dimension approach to service management is introduced with practical advice on how this approach is applied to libraries. A customer service self‐assessment is provided for libraries to evaluate how well they serve their customers and identify potential areas for improvement in regards to customer service.

Findings

The paper presents ways to establish an effective customer service plan in libraries and provides examples and models for better customer service initiatives.

Research limitations/implications

The paper shows that while the three dimensions of the “Service Triangle” and the implications for libraries are discussed, the interplays between all the dimensions need to be further explored.

Practical implications

The paper provides a practical guide and a useful source of information for libraries planning to set up customer service programs or to improve their customer service efforts.

Originality/value

This paper reviews the concept of customer service from the corporate world and discusses its implications and applications for libraries.

Details

Library Management, vol. 28 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-5124

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 1999

Charles L. Martin

The development and evolution of services marketing have been extraordinary. Provides a brief historical overview of services marketing, highlights its differences, then…

Abstract

The development and evolution of services marketing have been extraordinary. Provides a brief historical overview of services marketing, highlights its differences, then presents an extensive list of principles that attempts to reflect the current state of the field and provides a springboard for the further development of services marketing in the next millennium. The list provides guidelines for marketing managers and ideas for further research.

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Marketing Intelligence & Planning, vol. 17 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-4503

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Article
Publication date: 16 October 2007

Seongsin Lee

The puropse of this paper is to understand the components of Vroom's expectancy theory; to create or develop a public library customer motivation model using Vroom's…

Abstract

Purpose

The puropse of this paper is to understand the components of Vroom's expectancy theory; to create or develop a public library customer motivation model using Vroom's expectancy theory; to suggest appropriate public library services marketing mindset which public libraries can employ to enhance customers’ perceived expectancy and instrumentality of public library services to motivate customers to use public library services more frequently based on the proposed public library customer motivation model; and to suggest appropriate public library services marketing strategies to motivate customers to use public library services more frequently based on the proposed public library customer motivation model.

Design/methodology/approach

Research paper based on expectancy theory.

Findings

Customer‐centered mindset is the most important factor to motivate public library customers. Furthermore, the suggested marketing strategies can be also achieved through a customer‐centered marketing mindset. In conclusion, public libraries should continuously focus on the recognition of customers’ needs and deliver long‐term value to customers.

Originality/value

There were few studies that focused on library users’ motivations for using library products and services. In addition, there was a lack of developed theory in library and information science field.

Details

Library Review, vol. 56 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0024-2535

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1987

Myroslaw J. Kyj and Larissa S. Kyj

In business to business marketing, customer service offers firms the opportunity to differentiate themselves from competitors and thereby establish a competitive edge…

Abstract

In business to business marketing, customer service offers firms the opportunity to differentiate themselves from competitors and thereby establish a competitive edge. However, competing on the basis of customer service presents its own problems in the area of effectively segmenting markets and dealing with the free‐ride phenomenon. This article reviews the premise of customer service competition. The findings are integrated into a set of guidelines for the organization contemplating the use of customer service as a competitive tool.

Details

Journal of Business & Industrial Marketing, vol. 2 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0885-8624

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1990

William H. Davidow and Bro Uttal

“In all industries, when competitors are roughly matched, those that stress customer service will win.”

Abstract

“In all industries, when competitors are roughly matched, those that stress customer service will win.”

Details

Planning Review, vol. 18 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0094-064X

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Article
Publication date: 1 July 1990

Malcolm Peel

The importance of customer service to organisations of all kinds,whether in the public or private sector, is now acknowledged. But thedefinition is frequently too narrow…

Abstract

The importance of customer service to organisations of all kinds, whether in the public or private sector, is now acknowledged. But the definition is frequently too narrow. Good service starts before a transaction takes place and goes on after its completion, including the market research pre‐ordering climate; the buying/ordering process; the period from order to delivery, packaging or presentation; transport and logistics; delivery, complaint handling; payment and debt collection and after sales support service. Poor service may be contributed to by organisational culture, social attitudes, monopolies and market dominance and management failings. Improvement depends on a comprehensive programme, tackling causes as well as symptoms, involving a customer service survey; organisation review; standard setting; improved communications; training; and a process for continuous monitoring.

Details

Marketing Intelligence & Planning, vol. 8 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-4503

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Article
Publication date: 28 October 2013

Rod McColl

This paper aims to describe the experiences of Australian general insurer AAMI, the first private company to offer a customer charter and draw a comparison between service

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to describe the experiences of Australian general insurer AAMI, the first private company to offer a customer charter and draw a comparison between service guarantees and customer charters. The paper also proposes a decision-support framework for the design, implementation and management of an effective customer charter.

Design/methodology/approach

The methodology involved in-depth personal interviews and secondary data.

Findings

Many service guarantees are not well conceived, implemented, or monitored. The AAMI case, demonstrates how customer charters, originally developed in the public sector can be effectively adopted in private organizations. The customer charter appears to deliver significantly more benefits to customers and an organization than traditional service guarantees. Charters do this by publishing specific service standards based on extensive research, conducting independent audits, stating outcomes of below standard performance, providing a visible and accountable appeal system, and publicly and regularly reporting on performance against promises. An on-going feedback loop ensures continuous quality improvement.

Research limitations/implications

Customer charter findings are based on one case study.

Practical implications

Using a decision-support framework for a customer charter, services may be clearly defined and customer expectations managed building towards an organization-wide commitment to meet service promises.

Originality/value

Customer charters are rare, with little known about how they operate in a private organization. The findings indicate that charters may be more effective as a quality assurance and marketing tool than a service guarantee.

Details

Journal of Business Strategy, vol. 34 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0275-6668

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