Search results

1 – 10 of 427
To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 22 September 2020

Som Sekhar Bhattacharyya and Sumi Jha

The purpose of this study is to provide an explication of micro foundations of Corporate Social responsibility (CSR). CSR, as a study domain, has been accommodating…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to provide an explication of micro foundations of Corporate Social responsibility (CSR). CSR, as a study domain, has been accommodating individual centric aspects. Extant literature delved into firm aspects like regulation, the role of individuals such as leaders and managers in shaping the agenda and practice on CSR.

Design/methodology/approach

Based upon the responses of 396 managers, the authors explored how young managers assessed firm CSR actions and develop their role as potential customers, investors and potential employees toward a firm. For this study, a mediated moderator analysis has been applied to test the model.

Findings

The authors found that between an individuals’ customer-centric role toward firm products, positively relate to being a potential employee. However, there was also the presence of the mediation role of the individuals’ inclination for becoming an investor in firm shares. Further, there was a moderation role of an individual’s firm CSR product assessment. The developed model had four factors, namely, customer CSR firm assessment (CCFA), customer CSR product assessment (CCPA), investor CSR evaluation (ICE) and employee CSR aspiration (ECA).

Research limitations/implications

In this research, based upon systems justification theory and expectancy theory an individual-centric micro foundation based theoretical model on CSR were developed consisting of CCFA as an antecedent variable, ICE as mediating variable, CCPA as moderating variable and ECA as the dependent variable.

Originality/value

This study was one of the contributions toward a micro foundations based CSR approach model with role-plays as a customer, investor and potential employee.

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 22 March 2011

Shaun O'Callaghan

Shaun O'Callaghan draws on work from book: Turnaround Leadership, which gives managers and leaders the tools they need to make decisions that will help them to lead and

Downloads
2062

Abstract

Purpose

Shaun O'Callaghan draws on work from book: Turnaround Leadership, which gives managers and leaders the tools they need to make decisions that will help them to lead and motivate their staff, and better communicate with customers, investors, lenders and teams.

Design/methodology/approach

Examines the steps that have to be taken in order to successfully lead in times of crisis.

Findings

In the normal course of business, a leader is constantly making and trying to deliver on a set of promises to key stakeholders. The choices of what promises to make and, critically, the delivery against those promises is the fundamental core of what a business does. In many ways, you could say that the principal role of a leader is to make, balance and deliver business promises.

Practical implication

Offers a practical guide to making decisions and managing stakeholders when business conditions become tough.

Originality/value

When things go badly wrong, it is your role, as leader, to decide what promises (if any) you make, and to which of your stakeholders. In periods of disruptive change, people crave more certainty, even when you can probably provide less. In these circumstances, it is important to consider a 360 degree view of the problem, including the perspectives of your customers, investors, lenders, employees and suppliers. What do they really need to know and want to hear? This will help you to devise, communicate and deliver a successful recovery plan and make promises that balance.

Details

Human Resource Management International Digest, vol. 19 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0967-0734

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 8 June 2010

Supriti Mishra and Damodar Suar

This study aims to examine whether strategy towards primary stakeholders and their salience influence corporate social responsibility towards the corresponding stakeholders.

Downloads
2537

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to examine whether strategy towards primary stakeholders and their salience influence corporate social responsibility towards the corresponding stakeholders.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected through a questionnaire from 150 senior level managers including CEOs. The stakeholder management strategy, salience, and corporate social responsibility were assessed in the context of employees, customers, investors, community, natural environment, and suppliers.

Findings

The favorable strategy towards stakeholders increases the corresponding corporate social responsibility towards them. The salience of all stakeholder groups also enhances the corresponding corporate social responsibility. When salience and strategy are considered, the salience of a particular stakeholder group suppresses the effect of strategy fully or partially on corporate social responsibility.

Research limitations/implications

The salience of a stakeholder is a potent antecedent of corporate social responsibility compared with strategy towards that stakeholder.

Originality/value

A questionnaire is developed to assess corporate social responsibility in the Indian context, and the link between strategy, salience, and corporate social responsibility is established.

Details

Social Responsibility Journal, vol. 6 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1747-1117

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 16 July 2021

Aditi Singh and Madhumita Chakraborty

This study aims to empirically examine the relationship between corporate social responsibility disclosure (CSRD) and financial performance (FP) in Indian firms.

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to empirically examine the relationship between corporate social responsibility disclosure (CSRD) and financial performance (FP) in Indian firms.

Design/methodology/approach

Data for CSRD is collected by conducting content analysis of CSRD in annual reports of the sampled firms. A multidimensional measure of CSRD is constructed based on the stakeholder theory, consisting of six stakeholder groups – employees, customers, investors, community, environment and others. The aggregate CSRD measure is created by combining disclosure of the six CSR dimensions. Multiple regression analysis is used to examine the CSRD–FP linkage, controlling for the confounding effects of size, risk, age, industry, ownership and period.

Findings

The results of this study indicate that the aggregate CSRD measures, both for quality and quantity, have a positive association with the accounting measures of firms’ FP. However, the market measure of FP is observed to have a statistically insignificant association with aggregate quality and quantity of CSRD of Indian firms.

Practical implications

The results reveal that adopting transparent and extensive CSRD is relevant for the profitability of firms, and that government interventions are required to promote CSR programs, with a specific focus on the CSR dimensions that provide no apparent financial gains.

Social implications

This study recommends the adoption and reporting of CSR practices by Indian firms for their stakeholders.

Originality/value

This study contributes to the scarce literature on the CSRD–FP linkage in the context of emerging economies by using a more inclusive data set, creating a reliable measure of CSRD applicable to a large universe of firms and including relevant control variables that affect the CSRD–FP relationship.

Details

Sustainability Accounting, Management and Policy Journal, vol. 12 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-8021

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 18 April 2012

Ying Wang, Ming Li and William H. Mobley

In the opening chapter of this volume, Dave Ulrich and Norm Smallwood enlighten us with a unique perspective toward the understanding of leadership. They point out that in…

Abstract

In the opening chapter of this volume, Dave Ulrich and Norm Smallwood enlighten us with a unique perspective toward the understanding of leadership. They point out that in the past, most leadership research used an inside/out approach that studies leadership attributes (i.e., what is inside oneself that makes an effective leader). However, what matters more are the results that effective leadership produces. Therefore, an outside/in, business-values-driven approach should be adopted to match leadership to the expectations of various stakeholders, including customers, investors, organizations, and employees. The authors stress the importance of building leadership brand to better capture what stakeholders want and propose seven principles that can produce sustainable, long-lasting results from leadership development.

Details

Advances in Global Leadership
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78052-002-5

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 7 September 2018

Chiara Valentini and Dean Kruckeberg

The purpose of this paper is to discuss the corporate behavior of Volkswagen in its emissions scandal. It describes and analyzes a complex ethics dilemma within the…

Downloads
5280

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to discuss the corporate behavior of Volkswagen in its emissions scandal. It describes and analyzes a complex ethics dilemma within the purview of corporate social responsibility (CSR) and corporate sustainability (CS) and examines how this dilemma impacts critical stakeholders, thus offering several “opportunities to learn” for professionals.

Design/methodology/approach

The case takes a stakeholder perspective, applying Cavanagh et al. (1981) and Gao’s (2008) ethical judgement framework. It is situated within a qualitative approach to textual analysis. Social actors, topics and evaluative statements were identified and grouped into broader categories.

Findings

Six major stakeholders were directly affected by Volkswagen’s behavior: customers, investors and shareholders, the US Environmental Protection Agency, German authorities, European institutions and society-at-large. Stakeholder concerns were condensed into three dominant themes: economic, legal and environmental. According to the ethical judgment framework, Volkswagen corporate behavior showed ethical problems, theoretically demonstrating that under no ethical principle was Volkswagen’s actions justifiable, even under instrumental justifications.

Research limitations/implications

The analysis was primarily based on corporate material and news media reporting. Consequently, diverse managers’ prospectives and opinions are not entirely captured.

Practical implications

This paper offers several “opportunities to learn” for corporate communication professionals.

Originality/value

The focus on stakeholder perspectives allows professionals to take an outside-in approach when evaluating the impact of corporate actions on stakeholders’ interests. The case analysis through Cavanagh et al. (1981) and Gao’s (2008) ethical judgment framework provides a practical theoretical instrument to assess corporate behaviors that can be used both as pre- and post-evaluations of corporate actions on CSR and CS issues.

Details

Corporate Communications: An International Journal, vol. 23 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1356-3289

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 31 December 2019

Colleen Wolverton and David Stevens

The purpose of this paper is to investigate and quantify the effects of personality traits, as defined by the five-factor model (FFM) on an individual’s ability to detect…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate and quantify the effects of personality traits, as defined by the five-factor model (FFM) on an individual’s ability to detect fake news. The findings of this study are increasingly important because of the proliferation of social media news stories and the exposure of organizational stakeholders and business decision makers to a tremendous amount of information, including information that is not correct (a.k.a. disinformation).

Design/methodology/approach

The data were collected utilizing the snowball sampling methodology. Students in an Management Information Systems course completed the survey. Since a diverse sample was sought, survey participants were instructed to recruit another individual from a different generation. The survey questions of the FFM identify particular personality traits in respondents. Survey respondents were given a collection of nine news stories, five of which were false and four that were true. The number of correctly identified stories was recorded, and the effect of personality traits on the ability of survey respondents to identify fake news was calculated using eta-squared and the effect size index.

Findings

Each of the five factors in the FFM demonstrated an effect on an individual’s ability to detect disinformation. In fact, every single variable studied had at least a small effect size index, with one exception: gender, which had basically no effect. Therefore, each variable studied (with the exception of gender) explained a portion of the variability in the number of correctly identified false news stories. Specifically, this quantitative research demonstrates that individuals with the following personality traits are better able to identify disinformation: closed to experience or cautious, introverted, disagreeable or unsympathetic, unconscientious or undirected and emotionally stable.

Originality/value

There is scant research on an individual’s ability to detect false news stories, although some research has been conducted on the ability to detect phishing (a type of social engineering attack to obtain funds or personal information from the person being deceived). The results of this study enable corporations to determine which of their customers, investors and other stakeholders are most likely to be deceived by disinformation. With this information, they can better prepare for and combat the impacts of misinformation on their organization, and thereby avoid the negative financial impacts that result.

Details

Online Information Review, vol. 44 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1468-4527

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 December 2003

Larry Ackerman

A staggering amount of value may go unseen and unrewarded by customers, investors and employees in complex organizations in widely disparate industries. In the case of…

Downloads
513

Abstract

A staggering amount of value may go unseen and unrewarded by customers, investors and employees in complex organizations in widely disparate industries. In the case of Boise Cascade, once best known for forest products, the authors find a common denominator in the customer operations improvement business that defines all the company’s enterprises. The authors helped to create a brand strategy that changed perceptions among key stakeholders.

Details

Journal of Business Strategy, vol. 24 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0275-6668

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 January 2006

Larry Ackerman

The purpose of this article is to show how organizations become strategically more efficient when they are managed through the lens of identity.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this article is to show how organizations become strategically more efficient when they are managed through the lens of identity.

Design/methodology/approach

To study the similarities between organizations and human beings. Consulting assignments with over 100 large ($5 billion +) companies, including thousands of interviews with executives, employees, customers, investors and others.

Findings

The main finding has been that there is one set of natural laws – the Laws of Identity – which governs the lives and welfare of organizations and individuals alike.

Practical implications

All business functions, including board level agendas, should be organized to account for the impact of the company’s identity on performance expectations. Business strategy, including mergers, acquisitions and divestitures, should be assessed through the lens of identity, which supplies important decision criteria.

Originality/value

The article illuminates the linkages between human and organizational identity, providing specific roadmaps for leaders, managers and individuals to follow in comprehending their own organizations as living beings and in developing new ways to create value.

Details

Handbook of Business Strategy, vol. 7 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1077-5730

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 31 December 2007

Wanda J. Smith, Manisha Singal and William B. Lamb

The primary goal of this study is to conduct an empirical comparison of corporate social orientation (CSO) values held by US and Japanese students. The study also aims to…

Downloads
1443

Abstract

Purpose

The primary goal of this study is to conduct an empirical comparison of corporate social orientation (CSO) values held by US and Japanese students. The study also aims to test the stability of CSO with an exploratory assessment of the impact of international exposure on these values.

Design/methodology/approach

A total of 806 respondents were surveyed in the USA and Japan regarding their expectations of business organizations, their demographic attributes, and their level of international exposure. The survey results were compared using descriptive statistics, MANOVA and ANOVA.

Findings

The results support the assertion that CSO varies across individualistic and collectivistic cultures. Statistically significant differences were found between US and Japanese respondents in the relative ratings allocated to the four dimensions of CSO (economic, legal, ethical, and discretionary expectations). Results also indicate that CSO is a fairly stable set of values. International exposure was not found to have a statistically significant impact on CSO ratings.

Research limitations/implications

This study offers support for the variability of CSO across students in different cultures. It also suggests that further studies are needed to fully assess the impact of people's experiences on their CSO. Based on the differences identified, managers in these settings can expect to have their performance evaluated differently by customers, investors, regulators, and other groups.

Originality/value

This study presents the first comparison of CSOs between the USA and Japan. The study also presents a preliminary test of the relationship between people's international exposure and CSO.

Details

International Journal of Organizational Analysis, vol. 15 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1934-8835

Keywords

1 – 10 of 427