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Article
Publication date: 9 February 2015

Mario Burghausen and John M.T. Balmer

The purpose of this empirical study was to introduce the theory of corporate heritage stewardship by focussing on the nascent corporate heritage identity domain. In…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this empirical study was to introduce the theory of corporate heritage stewardship by focussing on the nascent corporate heritage identity domain. In particular, the research explores managers’ collective understanding of their organisation’s corporate heritage and how the latter is marshalled, and strategically represented, by them. The case study was undertaken in Great Britain’s oldest extant brewery. Established in 1698, Shepherd Neame is one of UK’s oldest companies.

Design/methodology/approach

Empirical research informed by a theory-building, case study using qualitative data. This study draws on multiple sources of data generated through semi-structured interviews, the analysis of documents and non-participant observations. The analysis of data was facilitated by a multi-stage coding process and a prolonged hermeneutic interaction between data, emerging concepts and extant literature.

Findings

Corporate heritage identity stewardship theory argues that the strategic enactment of a corporate heritage identity is predicated on a particular management mindset, which is meaningfully informed by three awareness dimensions expressed by managers (i.e. awareness of positionality, heritage, and custodianship). These awareness dimensions are underpinned by six managerial stewardship dispositions characterised by a sense of: continuance, belongingness, self, heritage, responsibility and potency. The findings are synthesised into a theoretical framework of managerial corporate heritage identity stewardship.

Research limitations/implications

The insights from this empirical case study meaningfully advance our theoretical understanding of the corporate heritage identity domain. Whilst the empirical contribution of this study is qualitatively different from statistical/substantive generalisations, which seek to establish universal laws, the research insights are valuable in terms of theory-building in their own terms and are analytically generalisable. The insights from this study have the potential to inform further studies on corporate heritage identities, including research underpinned by a positivistic, and quantitative, methodology.

Practical implications

The findings have utility for corporate marketing management, in that they illustrate how a collective corporate heritage mindset can both inform, as well as guide, managers in terms of their stewardship of their firm’s corporate heritage identity. The theoretical framework is of utility in practical terms, in that it reveals the multiple dimensions that are significant for management stewardship of a corporate heritage identity.

Originality/value

The research confirms and expands the notion of management stewardship in corporate identity in corporate marketing contexts by identifying how a multi-dimensional managerial mindset has constitutive and instrumental relevance. Moreover, this study identifies the distinct characteristics of this corporate identity type – corporate heritage identity – which are revealed to have a saliency for managers. Both insights underpin the corporate heritage identity stewardship theory explicated in this article.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 49 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

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Book part
Publication date: 26 November 2020

Brett Crawford and M. Tina Dacin

In this chapter, the authors adopt a macrofoundations perspective to explore punishment within institutional theory. Institutional theorists have long focused on a single…

Abstract

In this chapter, the authors adopt a macrofoundations perspective to explore punishment within institutional theory. Institutional theorists have long focused on a single type of punishment – retribution – including the use of sanctions, fines, and incarceration to maintain conformity. The authors expand the types of punishment that work to uphold institutions, organized by visible and hidden, and formal and informal characteristics. The four types of punishment include (1) punishment-as-retribution; (2) punishment-as-charivari; (3) punishment-as-rehabilitation; and (4) punishment-as-vigilantism. The authors develop important connections between punishment-as-charivari, which relies on shaming efforts, and burgeoning interest in organizational stigma and social evaluations. The authors also point to informal types of punishment, including punishment-as-vigilantism, to expand the variety of actors that punish wrongdoing, including actors without the legal authority to do so. Finally, the authors detail a number of questions for each type of punishment as a means to generate a future research agenda.

Details

Macrofoundations: Exploring the Institutionally Situated Nature of Activity
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83909-160-5

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Article
Publication date: 2 August 2013

John M.T. Balmer

The purpose of this paper is to advance the general understanding of the corporate heritage domain. The paper seeks to specify the requisites of corporate heritage and to…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to advance the general understanding of the corporate heritage domain. The paper seeks to specify the requisites of corporate heritage and to introduce and explicate the corporate heritage marketing and total corporate heritage communications notions.

Design/methodology/approach

As befits an opening article of the first special edition specifically devoted to corporate heritage, this article is largely conceptual in character and draws on the extant literature on corporate heritage brands and identities. In illuminating key points, it also makes reference to extant corporate heritage entities/brands.

Findings

A provisional theory of corporate heritage sustainability is articulated, as is the enumeration of key corporate heritage traits. The notions of corporate heritage marketing and total corporate heritage communications are introduced and articulated. Key corporate heritage traits requisites encompass omni‐temporality; institution trait constancy; external/internal tri‐generational hereditary; augmented role identities; ceaseless multigenerational stakeholder utility and unremitting management tenacity. Corporate heritage marketing consists of eight dimensions: corporate heritage character/communications/covenant/conceptualisations/culture/constituencies/custodianship/context. Total corporate heritage communicates consists of primary/secondary/tertiary and legacy communications.

Practical implications

The paper notes the need for assiduous management attention to be accorded to organisations with a bona‐fide corporate heritage. Managers are custodians – as are organisational members guardians – of a corporate heritage. Corporate heritage institutions because they are sui generis require distinct approaches vis‐à‐vis their preservation and management.

Social implications

Corporate heritage identities and corporate heritage brands confer not only corporate but also temporal, territorial, social, cultural and ancestral identities to multi‐generational groups of customers and other stakeholders. As such, they are of importance not only as corporate entities but also as perennial social identities as well. This is of importance to policy makers, managers and owners of corporate heritage identities and corporate heritage brands.

Originality/value

The unveiling of corporate heritage marketing and of total corporate heritage communications perspective and the articulation of key corporate heritage entity traits is original and is of value to corporate communications/corporate marketing scholars and practitioners alike.

Details

Corporate Communications: An International Journal, vol. 18 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1356-3289

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Article
Publication date: 14 March 2016

Maureen Henninger and Paul Scifleet

The purpose of this paper is to examine how keeping the records of social networking sites (SNS) communication for secondary analysis institutes a new type of memory…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine how keeping the records of social networking sites (SNS) communication for secondary analysis institutes a new type of memory practice, one that seeks both to capture shared public memories and form new cultural understandings.

Design/methodology/approach

Using a framework of documentary and memory practices the study conducts a qualitative content analysis of SNS communications collected from Facebook, GooglePlus and Twitter during a national event. It combines a content analysis of the communications with the analysis of their materiality and form to investigate potential contributions of SNS to social and cultural memory including their subsequent custodianship.

Findings

The study finds that the message architecture and metadata of different social networks is comparable and collectively evidences differing aspects of social events to document their unique discourse. Findings demonstrate the contribution SNS is making to social memory and a framework for understanding how SNS in being incorporated into cultural memory practice is presented.

Originality/value

This is one of the few studies that analyses a range of messages from differing SNS in order to understand their impact on cultural memory and the documentary practices of memory institutions.

Details

Journal of Documentation, vol. 72 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0022-0418

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Article
Publication date: 28 October 2011

Stephen Dobson

The purpose of this paper is to summarise findings from collaborative research with Sheffield City Council to help contribute to a national healthy walks initiative. The…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to summarise findings from collaborative research with Sheffield City Council to help contribute to a national healthy walks initiative. The primary purpose of the initiative is to help encourage a more active lifestyle through the uptake of regular walking. Highlighted here are some of the Sheffield urban walks which aimed to engage specifically with those living in more deprived urban communities. Reawakening the participants’ sense of enquiry and motivation to explore their everyday historic urban surroundings was an important stage in increasing the potential sustainable impact of the walking programme.

Design/methodology/approach

The Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC) funded project used an Action Research/collaborative approach to help develop the English Heritage GIS tool (Historic Landscape Characterisation) as both a catalyst for exploring the temporality of space and as a practical desk‐based means for defining potential walking routes.

Findings

The healthy walking initiative is used to illustrate how cross‐domain working can provide a powerful means to engage new audiences and it is asserted here that any form of community walking has the potential to increase the sense of custodianship of place.

Originality/value

(Re)awakening of attachment is explored here through engagement with an embedded and everyday material time‐depth. There are many urban residential areas which are not formally addressed by the urban designer, landscape architect, conservation officer or heritage professional and so require the engaged citizen to recognise the potential impacts of incremental change upon their surroundings.

Details

Journal of Cultural Heritage Management and Sustainable Development, vol. 1 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2044-1266

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 2006

Kathi Martin

In a quest to increase access to and conserve their collections many institutions are creating websites that do more than advertise the physical collection but provide…

Abstract

In a quest to increase access to and conserve their collections many institutions are creating websites that do more than advertise the physical collection but provide images and data for selected pieces from their collection. Libraries and archives, some with digital images, are implementing the standards for metadata harvesting and image capture created to facilitate the use of the internet, beyond its use as a tool for resource discovery, to a tool for “distributed custodianship” of resources. Small museums and collections may have trouble justifying the expending of the resources to implement these standards.

This paper describes an evolutionary prototype for an archiving project for Historic Costume that is developing a process to incorporate these standards into an online searchable database for the Collection, http://digimuse.cis.drexel.edu. The evolution of the prototype includes the retrospective conversion of collection data from 3“x5” paper file card to a relational database that includes images. All aspects of standardized data structure from naming conventions, data structure, and image capture have been considered.

Details

Research Journal of Textile and Apparel, vol. 10 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1560-6074

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Book part
Publication date: 26 November 2020

Joel Gehman

The concept of institution has been used by scholars from across a number of disciplines to explain a wide variety of phenomena. However, the philosophical roots of this…

Abstract

The concept of institution has been used by scholars from across a number of disciplines to explain a wide variety of phenomena. However, the philosophical roots of this concept have not been well examined, nor have implications for contemporary institutional analysis been fully appreciated. Returning to the works of Husserl and Merleau-Ponty reveals a depth of thinking that has otherwise been overlooked by institutional theorists. In particular, the author’s analysis reveals two critical insights. First, whereas organizational scholars have closely linked the concepts of institution and taken-for-grantedness, these two concepts were originally understood to be phenomenologically distinct. Second, a detailed examination of Merleau-Ponty’s later work poses the concept of flesh – the twining of the visible and the invisible – as the basis for the interplay of institutions. In turn, the idea of flesh as the foundation of institution invites a more radical reimagining of the growing bifurcation between microfoundations and macrofoundations.

Details

Macrofoundations: Exploring the Institutionally Situated Nature of Activity
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83909-160-5

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Book part
Publication date: 18 November 2020

Jarrett Blaustein, Tom Chodor and Nathan W. Pino

This chapter traces the history of global crime governance from the final decades of the nineteenth century to today, with particular attention paid to the United Nations…

Abstract

This chapter traces the history of global crime governance from the final decades of the nineteenth century to today, with particular attention paid to the United Nations and its crime programme after World War II. It highlights significant changes to the structure and mandate of the UN crime programme over the last 70 years and how UN agencies have helped shape the international crime policy agenda and its focus on development. The chapter then illustrates how vestiges of prevailing beliefs about development and crime and the global political economy that gave rise to them continue to influence the work of the UN system and the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) today. In this regard, our analysis highlights some institutional and structural challenges inherent to containing the ‘dark side of globalisation’ together with the ways in which the UN's efforts to do so privilege the interests and understandings of Northern countries. We conclude that these power asymmetries represent an obstacle to the UN's custodianship of criminological targets that feature in the SDGs, but stop short of suggesting that the governance of the crime–development nexus should be viewed as a coherent, neo-colonial project given the institutional weaknesses within the UN system, the ‘Rise of the South’ and the potential for civil society to contest its priorities and agendas.

Details

The Emerald Handbook of Crime, Justice and Sustainable Development
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78769-355-5

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Expert briefing
Publication date: 14 April 2016

His comments come as Israel and Jordan (which is the custodian of the site) move forward with plans to reduce tension at the site, which has been a flashpoint of conflict…

Details

DOI: 10.1108/OXAN-DB210532

ISSN: 2633-304X

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Geographic
Topical
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Article
Publication date: 1 August 1993

Dale L. Flesher

Most small businesses today could probably benefit from a management audit of the firm's long‐term financial affairs. In large corporations, internal auditors generally…

Abstract

Most small businesses today could probably benefit from a management audit of the firm's long‐term financial affairs. In large corporations, internal auditors generally have free rein to audit all operations—including the activities of the corporate treasurer and the controller's department. Such audits involve not only the financial aspects of operations, but the day‐to‐day operating aspects as well. Internal audits of operations are typically called operational audits in the United States and value‐for‐money audits in the countries of the British empire. “Value‐for‐money audits” is probably the best name because the objective of the auditors is to point out ways that a department can save money or enhance revenues. Now it would be nice if small businesses had internal auditors to conduct value‐for‐money audits, but such is not the case. Most small companies do not have internal auditors. However, there is another alternative. The owner or manager of a small business can conduct the audit on sort of a do‐it‐yourself basis. Although every department could possibly benefit from such an audit, it is the long‐term financial management of the organization that might profit the most from a value‐for‐money audit.

Details

Managerial Finance, vol. 19 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4358

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