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Article
Publication date: 15 May 2017

Anupam Kumar, David E. Cantor, Curtis M. Grimm and Christian Hofer

The purpose of this paper is to build and test theory regarding how rivalry in environmental management (EM) affects a focal firm’s environmental image and financial performance.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to build and test theory regarding how rivalry in environmental management (EM) affects a focal firm’s environmental image and financial performance.

Design/methodology/approach

The theory is tested with an original panel data set of 2,776 focal-rival dyad pairs. Measures of environmental signals are developed from content analysis of corporate sustainability reports. Environmental performance data are drawn from the Newsweek US 500 Green Rankings database. Financial performance data are drawn from COMPUSTAT.

Findings

The main findings are that focal firm signals have a positive and significant impact on both focal firm environmental image and financial performance. Rival firm signals have a negative effect on focal firm environmental image. Surprisingly, rival firm signals have a positive impact on focal firm financial performance.

Practical implications

This paper can serve as a testament to the value of monitoring rival firm strategies and signaling to counter the impact of rival signals in the environmental domain. Environmental practices can be a source of competitive advantage for firms, and failure to compete in this space can place the firm at a competitive disadvantage.

Originality/value

This study makes several contributions to the EM literature. Leveraging competitive dynamics and the institutional viewpoints, this study builds theory with regard to how signals of competitive EM activity among a focal firm and its rivals affect environmental image and financial performance.

Details

Journal of Strategy and Management, vol. 10 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-425X

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 28 February 2017

Martin Dresner and Curtis M. Grimm

Abstract

Details

Handbook of Logistics and Supply-Chain Management
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-8572-4563-2

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Article
Publication date: 21 August 2007

Carol J. Johnson, Curtis M. Grimm and Valdis Blome

The goal of this research is to identify which service activities contribute most to customer satisfaction in the technical wholesale industry in the Baltic States.

Abstract

Purpose

The goal of this research is to identify which service activities contribute most to customer satisfaction in the technical wholesale industry in the Baltic States.

Design/methodology/approach

In order to obtain an understanding of customer service in the countries of Latvia, Lithuania, and Estonia, a mail survey was done to investigate customer service obtained by 184 customers of a large technical wholesale firm doing business in the Baltic States.

Findings

The overall results of this research indicate that in the technical wholesale industry of the Baltic countries customer service contributes to customer satisfaction. Of the six dimensions tested, all of the relationships were in the expected direction. Only one did not contribute significantly to customer satisfaction. In order of importance to customer satisfaction the dimensions are: process quality, product quality, delivery quality, communication, availability and product support.

Research limitations/implications

To obtain more generalizable results, future research areas should include investigating the model using other firms within the same industry, and testing the model in additional industries within the Baltics. Additional research may include testing the model in other countries in Northern and Central Europe such as the well‐developed Scandinavian countries, and the lesser developed countries of Slovakia, the Czech Republic, and Poland as well as other areas of the world. This model was tested using data from the technical wholesale industry and additional research may focus on testing the model across different industries in different countries as well.

Practical implications

The results are of relevance to practitioners, in particular for firms expanding to the Baltic area. In addition, anecdotal evidence suggests that the level and number of customer service activities provided by technical services firms in the Baltic area of Northern Europe are based solely on management judgment or practices borrowed from competitors without considering the impact of service provision on customer satisfaction. Instead practitioners should consider the process used to deliver services and products.

Originality/value

This is the first empirical work measuring the impact of customer service dimensions on customer satisfaction using data from the Baltic States.

Details

The International Journal of Logistics Management, vol. 18 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-4093

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 1999

Carol J. Emerson and Curtis M. Grimm

Investigates the moderating effect of firm and environmental variables on the importance of a strategic element, customer service, in explaining satisfaction. The purpose…

Abstract

Investigates the moderating effect of firm and environmental variables on the importance of a strategic element, customer service, in explaining satisfaction. The purpose of this paper is twofold. Explores first, the direct impact of certain firm and environmental variables on satisfaction. Next, investigates the quasi‐moderating effects of firm and environmental variables on the relationship between customer service and satisfaction. Indicates that product line growth rate and supplier flexibility contribute to customer satisfaction both directly and through an interaction with customer service. Suggests that the remaining environmental variables tested – channel configuration, reseller size, rivalry, and reseller power – do not affect the amount of customer service provided.

Details

Journal of Business & Industrial Marketing, vol. 14 no. 5/6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0885-8624

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 1996

Carol J. Emerson and Curtis M. Grimm

Observes that interfunctional co‐ordination is important to the provision of outstanding customer service since both marketing and logistics activities are required…

Abstract

Observes that interfunctional co‐ordination is important to the provision of outstanding customer service since both marketing and logistics activities are required. Builds on a model first presented by Mentzer, Gomes and Krapfel, which conceptually integrated the logistics and marketing aspects of customer service. Communication, an additional logistics dimension, is added to the Mentzer, Gomes and Krapfel model. Uses factor analyses to test for convergent and discriminant validity, as well as to test for the appropriate number of model dimensions. Reliability of the measures is also assessed. Indicates seven dimensions of customer service. Three are from logistics: availability, delivery quality and communication; and four are from marketing: pricing policy, quality, product support‐sales representatives and product support‐customer service representatives. These differ somewhat from the Mentzer, Gomes and Krapfel model, which suggests that the physical distribution customer service dimensions might include availability, timeliness and delivery quality.

Details

International Journal of Physical Distribution & Logistics Management, vol. 26 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0960-0035

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2015

Curtis Grimm, Michael Knemeyer, Mikaella Polyviou and Xinyi Ren

The purpose of this paper is to identify and review empirical strategic management articles that pertain to supply chain management (SCM) and are published in top…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to identify and review empirical strategic management articles that pertain to supply chain management (SCM) and are published in top management journals.

Design/methodology/approach

The researchers review all articles published in five top management journals, namely, Academy of Management Journal, Administrative Science Quarterly, Management Science, Organization Science, and Strategic Management Journal, from 2004 to 2013, to identify empirical articles relevant to SCM. The researchers subsequently categorize the literature in thematic categories and subcategories, and they identify the theories informing the research and the methodologies applied.

Findings

The most prevalent finding of this literature review is that abundant research pertaining to SCM is being published in top management journals. This demonstrates that SCM is a broad phenomenon studied by scholars across disciplines; thus, a broader literature perspective can be beneficial to those working in this area. Moreover, the reviewed studies are informed by theories that extend beyond the “traditionally used” resource-based view and transaction cost economics. Finally, the majority of the research suggests an inter-organizational scope.

Originality/value

This study familiarizes logistics/SCM scholars with SCM-related research conducted in the strategic management field, informing them about the types of phenomena studied by strategic management scholars, the theoretical lenses and literature used to enhance understanding of these phenomena, and the empirical methodologies applied to examine those. Importantly, through this familiarization, logistics/SCM scholars can learn from but also contribute to the strategic management literature that pertains to SCM.

Details

International Journal of Physical Distribution & Logistics Management, vol. 45 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0960-0035

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 23 July 2020

Darlene Bay, Gail Lynn Cook and David Yeboah

Purpose – Recruiting sufficient participants who adequately represent the population of interest is an ongoing issue for accounting experimental researchers. This study…

Abstract

Purpose – Recruiting sufficient participants who adequately represent the population of interest is an ongoing issue for accounting experimental researchers. This study investigates the impact of recruitment method on the number of participants, effort on the experimental task, and sample bias with respect to three individual difference variables (locus of control, social desirability response bias, and prosocial behavior). We employ five different recruitment methods: three forms of monetary compensation and two levels of an appeal for help with a research project.

Methodology – We recruit students in five sections of the same course taught by the same instructor (not one of the researchers), manipulating recruitment method across sections. Immediately following recruitment, participants completed a simple experimental task and scales for the individual difference variables.

Findings – We find that the method of recruiting resulted in different response rates, with appeal from a fellow student yielding the highest response rate, and appeal from a professor yielding the lowest response rate. Effort was greatest for the appeal from the professor and least for the draw. While the five subsamples that resulted from the five recruiting methods were not different with respect to the individual difference variables, the relationship of those variables to effort did vary.

Research Implications – Our findings suggest that researchers must carefully consider recruitment method not only in terms of how many participants can be attracted, but also in terms of the potential impact of the manner in which recruitment was conducted on the attitudes and behaviors of the participants during the experiment.

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Book part
Publication date: 27 October 2016

Alexandra L. Ferrentino, Meghan L. Maliga, Richard A. Bernardi and Susan M. Bosco

This research provides accounting-ethics authors and administrators with a benchmark for accounting-ethics research. While Bernardi and Bean (2010) considered publications…

Abstract

This research provides accounting-ethics authors and administrators with a benchmark for accounting-ethics research. While Bernardi and Bean (2010) considered publications in business-ethics and accounting’s top-40 journals this study considers research in eight accounting-ethics and public-interest journals, as well as, 34 business-ethics journals. We analyzed the contents of our 42 journals for the 25-year period between 1991 through 2015. This research documents the continued growth (Bernardi & Bean, 2007) of accounting-ethics research in both accounting-ethics and business-ethics journals. We provide data on the top-10 ethics authors in each doctoral year group, the top-50 ethics authors over the most recent 10, 20, and 25 years, and a distribution among ethics scholars for these periods. For the 25-year timeframe, our data indicate that only 665 (274) of the 5,125 accounting PhDs/DBAs (13.0% and 5.4% respectively) in Canada and the United States had authored or co-authored one (more than one) ethics article.

Details

Research on Professional Responsibility and Ethics in Accounting
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78560-973-2

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 21 September 2018

William Starbuck

Courses in strategic management should teach future strategists how to react to unexpected strategic events such as the appearance of innovative technologies, proposed…

Abstract

Courses in strategic management should teach future strategists how to react to unexpected strategic events such as the appearance of innovative technologies, proposed mergers, drastic changes in production costs, or major actions by competitors or customers. Strategic events often trigger important changes in strategies, and reactions to strategic events make the difference between long-run success and failure. Courses can teach students about the philosophical and psychological difficulties posed by complex environments and uncertain futures and teach some procedures that help to assure that important issues receive consideration. Research may be able to identify some decision-making heuristics that foster success.

Details

Behavioral Strategy in Perspective
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78756-348-3

Keywords

Content available
Book part
Publication date: 20 November 2020

Abstract

Details

Supply Chain Management and Logistics in Emerging Markets
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83909-333-3

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