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Article
Publication date: 16 November 2012

Donato Iacobucci and Alessandra Micozzi

The purpose of this paper is to provide an analysis of the present situation and recent evolution of entrepreneurship education in Italian universities and to discuss…

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2106

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to provide an analysis of the present situation and recent evolution of entrepreneurship education in Italian universities and to discuss whether these courses and curricula match the demand for entrepreneurial competences.

Design/methodology/approach

The empirical analysis is based on a census of entrepreneurship courses and curricula run by universities. The information collected through the internet refers to the academic years 2003‐2004 and 2009‐2010.

Findings

Compared with the situation observed in the USA and in other European countries, entrepreneurship education in Italy is rather “underdeveloped”. Only a few universities have courses or specific curricula dedicated to entrepreneurship. The courses are concentrated within business faculties while very few exist in science and engineering faculties. The slow pace with which Italian universities are keeping up with the global trend in entrepreneurship education at university level seems in vivid contrast with the need for the Italian economy to change its industry structure from the so‐called “traditional” to “high‐tech” sectors. The paper discusses the reasons for this situation.

Research limitations/implications

The paper does not evaluate the impact of entrepreneurship education. A suggestion for future research could be to analyze the role of these courses in encouraging entrepreneurial activity of students.

Practical implications

Entrepreneurship education at university level can play an important role in the Italian economic system, fostering the creation of new business in knowledge‐intensive sectors.

Social implications

The exploratory analysis of the state of entrepreneurship education in Italy suggests the need to develop these courses and spread the presence, especially in the science and engineering universities.

Originality/value

The paper covers a lack of research on the attitude of higher education institutions towards entrepreneurship education in Italy.

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Article
Publication date: 16 March 2010

Ian Roffe

This paper aims to examine the variety of approaches to curriculum development for enterprise education developed for schools, further, and higher education under an…

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2247

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examine the variety of approaches to curriculum development for enterprise education developed for schools, further, and higher education under an Entrepreneurship Action Plan in Wales and to consider the sustainability issues for delivery in these sectors.

Design/methodology/approach

This investigation adopted a case study approach that obtained post‐development information obtained from stakeholders in curriculum development in the three sectors based on semi‐structured interviews. The paper presents an analysis of the curriculum development initiatives in schools, further and higher education based on a three‐stage categorisation model: inspiration, information and implementation and activities involving cross‐sector approaches.

Findings

Stakeholders generally provided positive feedback toward the curriculum development material from each sector. Curriculum development applied to fostering enterprising qualities and practical support produced a broad span of diverse actions across Wales covering inspiring, information and implementation. There are consistent threads in enterprise content of attitude, creativity, relationships and organisation. Curriculum content needs to be maintained and updated in a sustainable way and a sustainability framework is proposed together with a set of recommendations for each sector.

Practical implications

Suggestions on how to further strengthen and develop the sustainability of enterprise education programmes are provided for the three sectors: schools, further, and higher education, for example, through centralised curriculum support, the extension of credit‐based courses and structured staff development for stakeholders.

Originality/value

Enterprise education is acknowledged to have an influence on the knowledge, skills and attitudes of students and can contribute to entrepreneurship. Curriculum development in enterprise education enables educational institutions to stimulate interest of students and to foster entrepreneurial qualities among potential entrepreneurs in society. Approaches to curriculum development for three educational sectors are examined, categorised and recommendations advanced for sustaining such enterprise education programmes over an extended period of time.

Details

Education + Training, vol. 52 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0040-0912

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Article
Publication date: 23 March 2012

Dugassa Tessema Gerba

The purpose of this paper is to explore and evaluate entrepreneurship education in public universities in Ethiopia.

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2679

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore and evaluate entrepreneurship education in public universities in Ethiopia.

Design/methodology/approach

The study is based on the data obtained from 16 public universities in the country. The undergraduate curriculum of each university was examined to understand the departments in which entrepreneurship course(s) is/are offered. The syllabus for entrepreneurship course was examined to understand the focus areas and objectives of the entrepreneurship education. A questionnaire based on the literature was used to gather information about the background of entrepreneurship instructors, the teaching and evaluation methods employed in entrepreneurship courses.

Findings

The results show that entrepreneurship education is in its early phase of development in Ethiopian public universities. Entrepreneurship education was mainly offered in business schools and agricultural colleges, though recently it started to be included in the curricula of other schools too, mainly technology institutes/colleges. Traditional teaching and evaluation methods are dominant in teaching and assessing entrepreneurship courses in Ethiopian universities. Ethiopian public universities are also characterized by a dearth of entrepreneurship promotion centers.

Research limitations/implications

The study is based on the analysis of curricula and course syllabi and the evaluation of academic staff involved in teaching of entrepreneurship. The study would have been more complete had it included the perception of students.

Practical implications

The findings suggest the need for incorporating entrepreneurship education in all disciplines and the need to further improve the teaching and evaluation methods utilized in the courses. The findings also suggest the need to enhance the capacity of academic staff involved in teaching entrepreneurship.

Originality/value

The paper is the first to examine the state of entrepreneurship education in Ethiopian public universities in a detailed way.

Details

Management Research Review, vol. 35 no. 3/4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-8269

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 9 August 2013

Afreen Huq and David H. Gilbert

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the possible benefits of a work‐based learning (WBL) model in “social entrepreneurshipfor enhancing graduate employability and

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4128

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the possible benefits of a work‐based learning (WBL) model in “social entrepreneurshipfor enhancing graduate employability and an appreciation for “responsible” entrepreneurship.

Design/methodology/approach

Pre‐ and post‐course experience surveys were conducted with the yearly cohorts, followed by focus group discussions with students in each semester between 2008 and 2011. In addition, ten not‐for‐profit (NFP) industry partners were interviewed for their feedback on the enhanced curriculum.

Findings

The findings strongly validate the adoption of WBL curriculum for social entrepreneurship in enhancing graduate employability and opportunities for responsible entrepreneurship education. The case study also provides insights into how to overcome the key challenges relating to designing and implementing WBL models through a curriculum innovation in social entrepreneurship.

Research limitations/implications

Further research with longitudinal data is needed to validate the link between students undertaking work‐based learning and enhanced graduate employability. Future research should also investigate whether there is a major difference in the associated benefits and challenges of WBL initiatives between “social” andfor‐profit” enterprises.

Practical implications

Higher education providers could consider incorporating WBL as part of their response to the employability agenda, in a climate where employers are increasingly seeking graduates who possess entrepreneurial skills and an awareness of ethical and environmental concerns emerging from the new post‐global recession economic era.

Originality/value

Social entrepreneurship has received scant attention within the field of WBL. This case study demonstrates how this field can inform the WBL model to enhance graduate employability. It also provides a case for how WBL within the NFP sector can produce more socially responsible graduates who are capable of adding value to the CSR initiatives of organisations across sectors.

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Article
Publication date: 16 March 2015

Katherine Fulgence

The purpose of this paper is to assess the status of entrepreneurship courses offered in education schools. It provides recommendations for how to address the existing…

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1434

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to assess the status of entrepreneurship courses offered in education schools. It provides recommendations for how to address the existing challenges by developing entrepreneurship initiatives in education schools.

Design/methodology/approach

A survey was circulated to the management of all education schools in Tanzania, respective entrepreneurship educators and graduates from these schools. Random sampling was used to select teachers who had graduated from education schools.

Findings

The findings show that all education schools have an entrepreneurship module in the development studies course, which is mandatory for all students in first year. From 2008 to date, six education schools (31.6 per cent) have introduced stand-alone courses at undergraduate level reflecting entrepreneurship in their title and 68.4 per cent are planning to introduce entrepreneurship courses both at undergraduate and postgraduate level. Although entrepreneurship educators demonstrate subject specialty, they use traditional teaching and assessment techniques. The lack of books on entrepreneurship and the large number of students were cited as the main challenges affecting their role as subject facilitators.

Research limitations/implications

The study was limited to education schools in higher education institutions. Similar studies in non-business disciplines need to be conducted to establish how entrepreneurship is developed among graduates of higher education institutions.

Practical implications

The study recommends that the management of all education schools should be made aware of the need to provide courses in entrepreneurship, to integrate experiential learning and innovative techniques in the teaching and assessment processes and to involve students in extra-curriculum activities.

Originality/value

This is the first study to be conducted in Tanzanian higher education institutions that focuses on the teaching of entrepreneurship to education school students.

Details

Education + Training, vol. 57 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0040-0912

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 30 May 2013

Ye‐Sho Chen, Edward Watson, Edgard Cornacchione and Renato Ferreira Leitão Azevedo

There is an increased research interest in the recent phenomenon of Chinese small and medium‐sized businesses (SMEs) going abroad. The paper aims to enrich the literature…

Abstract

Purpose

There is an increased research interest in the recent phenomenon of Chinese small and medium‐sized businesses (SMEs) going abroad. The paper aims to enrich the literature by proposing a “Flying High, Landing Soft” curriculum helping Chinese SMEs going abroad. This innovative entrepreneurial curriculum is based on the Soft Landings program originally developed by the National Business Incubation Association. The objective of the curriculum is to provide a platform for students at various levels (undergraduate, graduate, and executive education) and business communities to engage in China‐USA‐Brazil entrepreneurship.

Design/methodology/approach

The “Flying High, Landing Soft” curriculum, consisting of three core elements (resources and networks; five steps process of coaching; cultivating storytellers), is grounded in the theories of input‐process‐output model of strategic entrepreneurship and docility‐based distributed cognition.

Findings

A “Flying High, Landing Soft” curriculum was developed to help the Chinese SMEs to invest in USA and Brazil. The curriculum is designed to take advantage of resources from the participating entities with the impact of enriching our students' educational experience and enabling business communities to engage in global business opportunities. The “Flying High, Landing Soft” curriculum is a win‐win program for everyone involved.

Practical implications

The curriculum is based on the Soft Landings International Incubator Designation program originally developed by the National Business Incubation Association. Since there is a need for the soft landings companies to go global, there is also a need for students to go global; the “Flying High, Landing Soft” curriculum is a merge of these two concepts.

Originality/value

The authors have developed a curriculum that links China‐USA‐Brazil entrepreneurs, investors, students and institutions to collaborate in order to help individuals to exploit market opportunities as well as use the process to educate students. This form of entrepreneurship curriculum is a contribution to our understanding about entrepreneurship, especially international entrepreneurship of SMEs.

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Book part
Publication date: 8 August 2015

Allan O’Connor

The task of this paper is to critique the ethics of an university entrepreneurship curriculum. For what purpose is entrepreneurship curriculum designed? Who decides what…

Abstract

The task of this paper is to critique the ethics of an university entrepreneurship curriculum. For what purpose is entrepreneurship curriculum designed? Who decides what is to be included in an entrepreneurship curriculum? Ethics has a plurality and implies moral judgment informed by any individual’s values. In applying entrepreneurship education the rationale and justification of what is offered and why should be clear. The paper provides a synthesis conducted on an extant literature review on the ethics of an entrepreneurship curriculum, entrepreneurship education stakeholders, and stakeholder rights and obligations. An ethics enquiry framework is concluded that entrepreneurship education curriculum designers can apply to surface the assumptions underpinning the curriculum and assist educators to be clear and explicit about the intent and ambitions for an entrepreneurship education curriculum design. While this paper develops a framework, it has yet to be tested. Further research can examine specific sets of stakeholder expectations, variations in obligations among regulatory or institutional settings, explicitly examine the range of effects of an entrepreneurship curriculum, and report the usability and practical relevance of such an evaluative framework. Ethics in entrepreneurship education is under-researched and more particularly the ethics of the entrepreneurship curriculum appears to have rarely been questioned. Entrepreneurship education lays the foundation for the future actions of those who shape and socially structure entrepreneurship. Therefore, as educators, there is a greater responsibility for ensuring that the education provided meets certain expectations of and obligations to various stakeholder groups.

Details

The Challenges of Ethics and Entrepreneurship in the Global Environment
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78441-950-9

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Book part
Publication date: 22 December 2016

Rebecca J. White and Kevin Moore

Entrepreneurship is one of the fastest growing disciplines at colleges and universities today. Programs span campuses offering traditional coursework and a variety of…

Abstract

Purpose

Entrepreneurship is one of the fastest growing disciplines at colleges and universities today. Programs span campuses offering traditional coursework and a variety of experiential learning options for students from all majors. While most agree that as much learning, if not more, occurs outside of the classroom, there has not been a model for integrating curricular and cocurricular components in entrepreneurship programs. Moreover, there has not been clear agreement on how to assess value from these programs.

Methodology/approach

To resolve this, we used a five-phase competency development process to create a customized learning model that engages the learner, the educator, and the community volunteer in the learning and assessment process at both the individual and program levels. This chapter presents a case study in a private, metropolitan university of 8200 students. The case study presents the problem and rationale, a history and overview of the application of competency-based education, and a five-stage process used to develop the model and apply the model to achieve a customized learning path for students in entrepreneurship.

Findings

The five-stage model of competency-based education can be applied to develop a customized learning approach and assessment path for students who study entrepreneurship. The use of a technology support platform can extend and simplify the use of this model and allow for the integration of curricular and cocurricular components of an experiential education.

Originality/value

This is a unique approach to integrating curricular and cocurricular education to provide a holistic experiential education for learners. The value of this program extends to faculty who assess learning and volunteers who participate in the learning experience. Specific attention is given to the challenges and process for curriculum mapping and the use of this model for assessment.

Details

Integrating Curricular and Co-Curricular Endeavors to Enhance Student Outcomes
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-063-3

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 1 March 2010

Marty Mattare

Entrepreneurship education is rapidly growing, both in the number of schools offering programs and in the range of courses. But, survey data shows that entrepreneurship

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1099

Abstract

Entrepreneurship education is rapidly growing, both in the number of schools offering programs and in the range of courses. But, survey data shows that entrepreneurship education is more likely to focus on how to evaluate business opportunities, write a business plan, present a proposal to investors, and conduct analytical exercises to determine value. The success of a venture begins with the entrepreneur, and as students become entrepreneurs, they will need to wear a variety of “hats” and serve as the primary finance, marketing, human resources, and operations person. High self-efficacy, emotional intelligence, and well-developed interpersonal skills have been shown to equate to a firmʼs success.These skills are rarely polished and perfected in the classroom. But, because they are so critical, more concentration on their development is needed in the entrepreneurship curriculum. This article presents the case and provides a model for developing “Use of Self” skills in the entrepreneurship classroom.

Details

New England Journal of Entrepreneurship, vol. 13 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2574-8904

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Article
Publication date: 13 February 2017

Afreen Huq and David Gilbert

The purpose of this paper is to present an alternate approach to entrepreneurship pedagogy development through an iterative journey of co-ownership between students…

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3192

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to present an alternate approach to entrepreneurship pedagogy development through an iterative journey of co-ownership between students, industry partners and academic course teams to enhance student satisfaction and learning outcomes.

Design/methodology/approach

Utilising design thinking, the pedagogy evolved over a three-year period (2013-2015) through iterative innovation in the delivery model and assessments, underpinned by notions of classroom community, constructivism, justice and equity, humour and role-play.

Findings

The findings strongly validate the integration of notions of justice and equity, constructivism, humour and role-play as learning principles and delivery elements in entrepreneurship pedagogy to enhance student satisfaction and learning outcomes. A critical outcome of this design and delivery process is the reduction of barriers between students and teachers and the impact this has on creating a shared learning journey; a journey that in this case has resulted in meaningful outcomes for all involved.

Research limitations/implications

Further research with longitudinal data is needed to validate the link between design-led entrepreneurship pedagogy and enhanced student learning outcomes as well as implications relating to graduate employability. In global settings, further data collection could also validate whether the findings are culturally neutral or culturally sensitive.

Practical implications

Entrepreneurship educators will benefit from this pedagogical approach in seeking to meet the needs of business start-ups, intrapreneurial capacity-building and potentially, enhancement of graduate employability. The model also offers promise for other learning contexts.

Originality/value

Design thinking has received scant attention in entrepreneurship pedagogy. This case study demonstrates how design thinking can enhance student satisfaction and learning outcomes by integrating notions of constructivism, justice and equity, humour and role-play in entrepreneurship curricula.

Details

Education + Training, vol. 59 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0040-0912

Keywords

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