Search results

1 – 10 of 77
To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

Andres Velez-Calle, Misha Mariam, Maria Alejandra Gonzalez-Perez, Alfredo Jimenez, Julia Eisenberg and Sandra Milena Santamaria-Alvarez

There is a generalized belief that cultural differences can have more negative consequences than benefits within the international business (IB) literature. This study…

Abstract

Purpose

There is a generalized belief that cultural differences can have more negative consequences than benefits within the international business (IB) literature. This study argues that cultural differences are not perceived as constrains in millennial global virtual teams (GVTs). Additionally, using the theory of cooperation and competition and the motivated information processing perspective, the purpose of this paper is to uncover the process by which millennials working in GVTs address various challenges to ensure effective functioning and accomplishment of desired team outcomes.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper analyzes a data set of 503 project journals from the global enterprise experience, a virtual team competition. It uses qualitative content analysis tools and secondary data sources.

Findings

The authors find that for millennials, cross-cultural issues are not the predominant challenge when working in GVTs, unlike the prevailing understanding in the IB literature. This is because contrary to expectations, cross-cultural problems are often not experienced, while other team phenomena become more relevant, such as interpersonal and task-based issues. In addition, the paper describes how members of GVTs apply distinct challenge reconstruction and solution generation cognitive schemes to deal with both, expected and unexpected challenges.

Originality/value

This study contributes to the literature on virtual teams by identifying how millennials and post-millennials deal with the challenges embedded in the GVT interaction context by simplifying the unfamiliarity associated with the broader context rather than addressing each issue in isolation. Finally, the paper elaborates on factors that highlight the positive outcomes of multicultural teams while making cultural differences less salient in contemporary GVT contexts.

Details

critical perspectives on international business, vol. 16 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1742-2043

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

Luciana Lang

Recent works by organisational anthropologists have identified bureaucracy as a major challenge for unskilled workers in the global economy. Daily encounters with…

Abstract

Purpose

Recent works by organisational anthropologists have identified bureaucracy as a major challenge for unskilled workers in the global economy. Daily encounters with bureaucratic processes only enhance general feelings of inadequacy, frustration and insecurity experienced by social groups who have to rely on precarious work. However, a focus on people’s homespun strategies and on the role of the non-profit sector in helping them to navigate bureaucracy is still incipient. The paper aims to discuss these issues.

Design/methodology/approach

The research, ethnographic in its approach, unveils some of these challenges by drawing on 29 interviews with migrant workers in a third sector organisation in Manchester, UK. It explores migrants’ work experiences and aspirations, and the strategies used to navigate the bureaucracy embedded in the organisation of their lives. Informed by the different roles the researcher performed at the centre and by the inter-disciplinary nature of the projects, the methodology includes interviews, participative observation, analysis of life story narratives and drawings, and participation in community workshops.

Findings

While acknowledging that bureaucracy can keep people in liminal spaces and enhance their sense of insecurity, this paper reveals how personal aspirations and the ability to make connections across different social networks provide the much needed drive that enables migrants to acquire language skills, a tool that helps them to learn the ropes of bureaucratic processes, become culturally savvy, and leave the stage of quasi-citizenship.

Originality/value

Responses highlight the significance of recent welfare reforms and reveal adaptive mechanisms to deal with resulting uncertainties, which include the use of a variety of social networks, learning hew digital and language skills, and seeking specialized knowledge found in organisations in the third sector. The study also questions the taken-for-granted rationality of bureaucracy, unveiling its messy and ambiguous logic.

Details

Journal of Organizational Ethnography, vol. 8 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-6749

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part

Susana C. Silva, Paulo Duarte, Carla Martins and Paulo Collaço

A radical set of social and structural shifts in the last years has transformed the world, bringing a confusing order that few have been able to predict. Common sense…

Abstract

A radical set of social and structural shifts in the last years has transformed the world, bringing a confusing order that few have been able to predict. Common sense information and myths about Millennials’ generation define them as being very homogeneous and different from other generations, which would be already a complex dimension to analyze. However, the complexity increases according to some studies that suggest that other generations have a flawed perception of Millennials. Based on this, the purpose of this chapter is to assess the self-image Millennials regarding consumption behavior and compare it with how they are perceived by other generations, namely, Boomers and Generation Xers. Identifying and understanding the differences could assist in improving the ability to market to them. To conduct this study, a survey was developed to collect data from each group of interest located in the same institutional setting to avoid institutional distance. The constructs included were Technology Savviness, Social Responsibility, Environmental Concern, Status Consumption, and Brand Loyalty. The final sample consisted of 342 participants where 182 were Millennials (53.8%) and the remaining 160 were either Baby Boomers or Generation Xers (42.8%). The current results support the idea of differences between self and other perception, although not in every dimension. The results show that Millennials and older generations have different perceptions regarding Millennial technology savviness, social responsibility, status consumption, and brand loyalty. Environmental concern was the only dimension where the self-opinion of Millennials did not differ from the other generations. Current findings are pertinent because differences in Millennial’s behaviors are important for companies addressing international markets. These results challenge research conducted in other cultural landscapes and call for the need to validate the typical pattern, which lays over the idea that there are significant differences among Millennials’ self-perception and perception of others about them. Because this information provides useful knowledge for brands to become more effective, it is crucial for managers of companies conducting business in a global context to be acquainted with it. This will promote the possibilities to create and maintain close relationships with the Millennials, taking into account the institutional setting in which they grew up. Finally, this study emphasizes the importance of environmental concerns in the current world, which may have the power to unite different generations for a single global cause, thus sorting out some of the confusion.

Details

The Multiple Dimensions of Institutional Complexity in International Business Research
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80043-245-1

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here

Abstract

Details

The Multiple Dimensions of Institutional Complexity in International Business Research
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80043-245-1

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

Vanessa Gaitree Gowreesunkar, Hugues Seraphin and Mohammad Nazimuddin

Begging is undoubtedly an ancient phenomenon but when explored from the tourism perspective, it is relatively new. Begging has existed across several historical periods…

Abstract

Purpose

Begging is undoubtedly an ancient phenomenon but when explored from the tourism perspective, it is relatively new. Begging has existed across several historical periods, but with sophistication and savviness, it has developed into a lucrative form of tourism business. While previous studies have reasonably explored the beggar–tourist interaction in several socio-economic contexts, the present one attempts to research an unusual aspect of these encounters which is termed as “black market tourism.” In the current study, black market is explained as a clandestine but visible market where tourism transactions take place within three important stakeholders, namely, the beggars, the tourists and shopkeepers. The transaction is found to have some aspects of illegality, but ultimately, serves the manifest function of yielding money and growing the underground network. This triangular interaction is therefore of relevance to understand the functioning of this black market involving those key stakeholders. With this notion as foundation, this study aims to empirically and conceptually explore the phenomenon of black market tourism which is derived from the beggar–tourist– shopkeeper encounter in an important city of India called Hyderabad. The specific location of the study was Chaar Minaar, a popular tourism city with ancient monument and shopping places in Hyderabad (India). Tourism in India is undeniably infused with the notions of color and culture, but how this colorful context gradually developed into a colorless black market tourism economy is worthy of study.

Design/methodology/approach

From a methodological point of view, this conceptual paper draws on unobtrusive research methods (written records, non-participant observations, informal interviews and occasional photography).

Findings

Findings show that begging is developing into a lucrative industry without costly investment and beggars operate in a cartel. The black tourism market is found to be an emerging underground tourism economy with established stakeholders, who are rapidly progressing and growing their network. The network is seen to be increasingly attracting educated and young professionals.

Research limitations/implications

The research is explorative and provides a consistent and empirically based starting point for research on black market tourism involving beggar–tourist and beggar–shopkeeper interactions in Indian cities. The sample being very limited, it is important to stress the limited possibilities to generalize the findings of this study to other destinations. Moreover, the assumption that the background of the local researcher might have influenced the interpretation of primary data need not be neglected, thus suggesting a further examination to confirm validity of the results.

Practical implications

The study provides information not only to destination managers interested to diversify the tourism product, but also to policymakers who are fighting against begging in the city of Hyderabad. The beggar experience can be used to attract more tourists seeking authenticity, provided that the process is improved by adding in some level of professionalism. For instance, beggars could be trained to perform decently in a town hall where tourists are invited to attend cultural shows. To some extent, this study may also help empowering beggars to become part of the tourism ecosystem. This is important, as modern society has disempowered economically disadvantaged members of the community (Hutton, 2016). Ultimately, the study attempted to show that disempowered members of the community are not always passive and powerless. They can create business out of another business (a re-invented form of beggarism that has potential to generate money from tourism).

Social implications

The study has a social aspect as it takes the involvement of three stakeholders, namely, the tourists, the beggars and the shopkeepers. The study shows how begging transactions affect the three stakeholders and it sheds light on its overall impact on Hyderabad, as a tourism destination.

Originality/value

To the best of authors’ knowledge, no tourism study (academic and non-academic) has so far considered the beggar–tourist encounter from a black market perspective. The findings offer new information on a reinvented form of beggarism and unveils that this black market is a well-entrenched system operated by an educated pool of people and professionals. Ultimately, the study attempts to show that disempowered members of the community (beggars) are not always passive and powerless. They can create business out of another business (a re-invented form of beggarism that has potential to generate money out of tourism).

Details

International Journal of Tourism Cities, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-5607

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here

Abstract

Details

The Quirks of Digital Culture
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78769-916-8

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

Daniella Fjellström and David S. A. Guttormsen

Researchers often face challenges in locating and obtaining relevant and meaningful information during qualitative international business (IB) field research in other…

Abstract

Purpose

Researchers often face challenges in locating and obtaining relevant and meaningful information during qualitative international business (IB) field research in other countries. This process constitutes an immensely critical phase, which determines the success or failure of the research endeavour. The purpose of this paper is to discuss “access” as a multidimensional and contestable concept that poses particular challenges in international and multicultural research contexts.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper builds on the experience as field researchers in China/Hong Kong (120 in-depth interviews) and the need to disseminate acquired field experiences, in particular concerning “access”. The multifaceted issue of “access” is rarely featured on the IB methodological agenda, and has become a silent feature of qualitative IB research.

Findings

This paper is devoted to this nexus: the lack of focus on “access” issues, and the rich sources of acquired, but mostly veiled, field experiences that feature in both IB and management research programmes. A plausible explanation for this circumstance relates to the influence of mainstream positivist and objectivist paradigms in which researchers are not recognised as having an impact on research processes, hence taking this silent feature for granted.

Originality/value

By viewing the multiple dimensions of “access”, we move beyond the mainstream understanding that merely relates it to the question of gaining access to a physical site and/or the time of an individual, and in which “access” is only an enterprise of securing pre-existing, tangible information. Drawing upon specific international field research experiences, this paper contributes to the methodological debate concerning “access” – beyond “technicality” and towards a concept of socio-cultural and multidimensional research practice.

Details

Qualitative Research in Organizations and Management: An International Journal, vol. 11 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-5648

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here

Abstract

Details

The Quirks of Digital Culture
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78769-916-8

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

Timothy T. Self, Susan Gordon and Phillip M. Jolly

This study aims to examine how hospitality human resource (HR) professionals assess talent when recruiting college students, how MIT programs are structured and how…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to examine how hospitality human resource (HR) professionals assess talent when recruiting college students, how MIT programs are structured and how recruiters perceive GenZ compared to Millennials.

Design/methodology/approach

A Delphi approach was used to collect the opinions of experts in the area of hospitality recruiting and talent development.

Findings

Results showed integrity and strong work ethic are top descriptors to define talent, and prior performance and soft skills are top items assessed when hiring talent. The participants view GenZ as desiring work-life balance, tech savvy, interested in social responsibility, more accepting of differences, wanting higher salaries and more tech savvy than Millennials.

Practical implications

Recruiters highly value prior work experience so students should be encouraged to pursue internships with companies they are interested in working for upon graduation. Providing mock interviews and networking events can help students better their soft skills. Organizations using MIT programs should use realistic job previews in the selection process and make regular coaching and mentoring a key part of the program. Hospitality organizations should place emphasis on GenZ’s quest for work-life balance and find ways to take advantage of their technology savviness.

Originality/value

This study is one of the first to understand how hospitality organizations’ MIT programs are structured. It is one of the few to examine how talent is defined and assessed by hospitality HR professionals and compare HR professionals’ perceptions of GenZ versus Millennials.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 31 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part

Judit Bodnar and Judit Veres

This chapter looks at the changing politics of urban redevelopment in a politically divided democratic regime following the end of state socialism in 1989. It contrasts…

Abstract

This chapter looks at the changing politics of urban redevelopment in a politically divided democratic regime following the end of state socialism in 1989. It contrasts the emergence of two cultural institutions of national importance, the Palace of Arts and the National Theatre, as part of a megaproject in Budapest. They emerged almost at the same time as part of the Millennium City Center, a large-scale urban redevelopment project, but have come to stand for two radically opposed worlds dividing the nation and pitting against each other – the cosmopolitans and the nationalists. The research design is that of incorporated comparison; the two case studies are embedded in the analysis of the larger redevelopment project. The study mixes primary and secondary sources; draws on interviews, extensive discussions with architects and planners, as well as an analysis of planning documents, expert reports, and media coverage. It describes the dynamics of private–public partnerships in urban politics pointing to the changing role of the post-socialist state and the new power relations among the various groups involved in urban development in a newly democratizing regime. On the one hand, the analysis shows how local and national-scale political fights make sense from a larger political–economic perspective of waterfront regeneration; on the other, it argues that party politics in politically divided regimes have serious implications on the processes of large-scale urban development, ultimately making them even more under-determined than suggested by the literature. The chapter breaks the assumed unity of the state in studies of urban megaprojects and demonstrates the usefulness of both a scalar analysis and that of the changing political content of the state, which ultimately account for much of the variation in this global genre.

1 – 10 of 77