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Article

Tris Kee

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the positive externalities of adaptive reuse of heritage buildings and the economic impact on adjacent residential property…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the positive externalities of adaptive reuse of heritage buildings and the economic impact on adjacent residential property prices as adaptive reuse is emerging as a significant heritage management and cultural heritage conservation practice recognized by the International Council on Monuments and Sites.

Design/methodology/approach

Through mixed methodologies of hedonic price model and case studies of three tenement houses in Hong Kong, this paper argues that the adaptive reuse of heritage buildings increases the values of residential properties within the district and revitalizes the area economically and culturally because of the positive externalities generated from the cultural heritage.

Findings

The findings have identified key cultural heritage values of adaptive reuse via the case studies as well as the major intangible cultural values associated with the heritage assignment. On the other hand, the hedonic regression also verifies that key variables such as heritage completion and distance from heritage show significance to the property prices of adjacent residential units.

Practical implications

The research is useful for heritage conservationists, policy makers and urban planners in other cities with regards to management and implementation of sustainable cultural heritage revitalization schemes for economic benefits.

Originality/value

The research is original in its scope and context, and is one of the first of its kind for a high-density metropolitan context in Hong Kong and is significant in demonstrating the economic impact of the heritage practice of adaptive reuse.

Details

Journal of Cultural Heritage Management and Sustainable Development, vol. 9 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2044-1266

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Article

Xiwen Chen

The purpose of this paper is to provide a deeper understanding of the rural revitalization strategy, from the perspective of the fundamental functions that should be…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to provide a deeper understanding of the rural revitalization strategy, from the perspective of the fundamental functions that should be served by China’s rural areas in the implementation of this strategy.

Design/methodology/approach

Theoretical and comparative analyses of the functional relationship between China’s rural development and urban development, between China’s agricultural development and industrialization and that between China’s traditional culture and rural development today are conducted to identify the fundamental functions that should be performed well by China’s rural areas in the implementation of the rural revitalization strategy.

Findings

Three fundamental functions of China’s rural areas are identified: first, the function of ensuring national food security and the supply of important agricultural products; second, the function of providing effective ecological barriers, a good eco-environment and high-quality ecological products; third, the function of inheriting the extraordinary traditional Chinese culture.

Originality/value

This paper is the first to systematically summarize the fundamental functions China’s rural areas should perform during the process of rural revitalization.

Details

China Agricultural Economic Review, vol. 12 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1756-137X

Keywords

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Article

Samantha J. Callan

The purpose of this paper is to challenge the notion that culture change programmes will inevitably gain support from employees by exploring ways in which policy…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to challenge the notion that culture change programmes will inevitably gain support from employees by exploring ways in which policy implementation is affected by and provokes shifts in organizational cultures.

Design/methodology/approach

Case studies investigated aspects of cultural change post‐implementation of family‐friendly policies. A grounded theory approach was adopted in the collection and analysis of the data, largely but not exclusively obtained through three sets of interviews, giving a limited longitudinal dimension to the study.

Findings

As both organizations had been sated with change, the idea that further adjustment was necessary to facilitate better work‐life balance for employees was potentially alienating to the very members most needing to be “brought on board”. Harnessing widely esteemed values and adopting the language of “cultural revitalisation” rather than cultural change appeared more effective in securing broader support of employees.

Research limitations/implications

Studies began after policy implementation so there was significant dependence on participant recall to access perceptions of any shifts and HR managers determined sample composition. Both necessitated the use of a wide range of supplementary evidence (as befits case study research) and the latter the development of an “informal track” of participants.

Practical implications

Cultural change programmes must appreciate the importance of enduring values, correctly identifying those which appear most resonant for employees, ensuring that these feature prominently when promoting a “work‐life balance” agenda.

Originality/value

It is unusual for case studies to look in detail at processes of change. This paper refines notions of organizational culture change and considers how best to include employees most likely to be resistant to a “work‐life balance” agenda.

Details

Qualitative Research in Organizations and Management: An International Journal, vol. 3 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-5648

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Article

Amusi Odi

Discusses management style as portrayed in Western literature. Compares this with the approach to management taken by the Igbo of Eastern Nigeria. Describes the Igbo…

Abstract

Discusses management style as portrayed in Western literature. Compares this with the approach to management taken by the Igbo of Eastern Nigeria. Describes the Igbo belief system, magic and language and the implications of this culture on library management. Refers to the impact of cultural revitalisation librarianship of the 1970s.

Details

Library Management, vol. 22 no. 4/5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-5124

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Book part

Lisa Ruhanen and Michelle Whitford

Tourism and events have been identified as providing opportunities to revitalize regional and remote economies. In Australia such areas have limited economic opportunities…

Abstract

Tourism and events have been identified as providing opportunities to revitalize regional and remote economies. In Australia such areas have limited economic opportunities and are constrained by a range of development barriers, including access to markets and human capital. Importantly, tourism in particular is seen as an economic activity that provides scope for Indigenous communities and individuals in regional and remote parts of the country to leverage development opportunities. A number of the island communities of the Torres Strait, the most northern region in Australia, are exploring the potential of tourism and events as an economic development strategy, yet the region is severely constrained by a number of development barriers.

Details

Tourism as an Instrument for Development: A Theoretical and Practical Study
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-85724-680-6

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Article

Mark Christal

A dissertation study combined four case studies that examined school‐museum partnerships for virtual museum projects in which students did virtual reality imaging of…

Abstract

A dissertation study combined four case studies that examined school‐museum partnerships for virtual museum projects in which students did virtual reality imaging of museum objects related to their cultures. Students also researched their selected objects with the help of museum professionals, anthropologists, and community members. Project plans also specified that students would write essays to accompany the virtual museum exhibits, but that was not always accomplished. Each case is discussed, giving a brief sampling of some of the themes that emerged from them. A composite picture of the cases provided a more comprehensive description of the innovation through nine theme categories derived from the four cases. Three of the theme categories are discussed. The four cases were also examined to see what they revealed about culturally responsive teaching. Four of the ten culturally responsive elements identified in the study are discussed.

Details

The Electronic Library, vol. 21 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0264-0473

Keywords

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Article

Elina Närvänen and Christina Goulding

The purpose of the paper is to build a sociocultural perspective of brand revitalization. Maintaining brands and bringing them back to life in the market has received much…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of the paper is to build a sociocultural perspective of brand revitalization. Maintaining brands and bringing them back to life in the market has received much less interest than their creation. Moreover, the existing literature is dominated by the marketing management paradigm where the company’s role is emphasized. This paper addresses the phenomenon of brand revitalization from a sociocultural perspective and examines the role of consumer collectives in the process.

Design/methodology/approach

Using a data-driven approach, the study builds on the case of a consumer brand of footwear that has risen to unprecedented popularity without traditional marketing campaigns. Data were generated using an inductive theory building approach utilizing multiple methods, including interviews, participant observation and cultural materials.

Findings

The paper presents a conceptual model of cultural brand revitalization that has four stages: sleeping brand, spontaneous appropriation, diffusion and convergence.

Practical implications

Implications for companies in consumer markets are discussed, suggesting ways to facilitate the process of sociocultural brand revitalization.

Originality/value

The paper contributes to the literature first by offering a sociocultural brand revitalization scenario that highlights the interplay between the actions of consumers and the company, second, by examining the interaction between the symbolic meanings associated with the brand and the practices used by consumers and, third, by offering insights into the relevance of national identity in creating brand meaning.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 50 no. 7/8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

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Article

Sara María Torres Outón

The purpose of this paper is to explore, through the analysis case, how the revitalization of a historic centre has been carried out and the role of tourism in this process.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore, through the analysis case, how the revitalization of a historic centre has been carried out and the role of tourism in this process.

Design/methodology/approach

This case study area is well-documented as there has been extensive fieldwork on the transformation of the commercial sector in the Monumental Zone of Pontevedra in the last three decades. In order to prepare this paper, a bibliographic review, in-depth interviews, premises registration data and population data have been used.

Findings

The findings show that the processes of change and revitalization do not conform to a single reality common to all historical centres, although similar strategies are developed, the role of the participating actors and, especially, the idiosyncrasy of these spaces change the outcomes. On the one hand, gentrification does not occur and the increase of residential uses is still a goal. On the other hand, the tourism strategy brings more visitors and complements the commerce activity and attraction.

Social implications

The new challenge of these spaces, and the urban contribution from this research, is that in the appropriation of space by citizens, tourism may be a complement for commerce, and shops and hospitality (facilities) make these spaces more livable. Although tourism does not necessarily increase the number of residents, the revenue from tourism may prevent the reoccurrence of abandonment.

Originality/value

The paper focusses on both gentrification and touristification; processes that have led to the substitution of residents and activities and the conflict with the local population and the normalization of urban life. This case has been selected because despite a seemingly successful revitalization process, recently some old threats seem to be returning.

Details

International Journal of Tourism Cities, vol. 6 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-5607

Keywords

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Article

Rosa Enn

The purpose of this paper is to draw attention to an indigenous community that lives in the periphery of Taiwan. The Tao were confronted with modernization beginning with…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to draw attention to an indigenous community that lives in the periphery of Taiwan. The Tao were confronted with modernization beginning with the Japanese colonial time and later through missionary work and Sinicization. These exogenous factors had a major influence on the Tao's traditional lifestyle and cultural habits. After democratization and due to the Tao's empowerment and efforts of multicultural education as well as interactive learning applications, a revitalization of traditional knowledge, and cultural customs became visible.

Design/methodology/approach

The methodology is inspired by social scientific methods that are common in anthropological research. The data collection are based on ethnographic field work that provides a unique and authentic picture of the subject. Besides participating and systematic and informal observation, qualitative forms of interviews were applied.

Findings

The paper highlights the influences and dynamics of exogenous and endogenous factors on the traditional lifestyle of an indigenous community in the western Pacific. Due to global influences of modernity, the Tao's spiritual belief lost its importance and the traditional structures of the people began to change. However, the Tao were not only passive toward the transformation to a modern society, but they also contributed to the cultural revitalization on their own in terms of education and teaching management.

Originality/value

The paper provides valuable insights into an indigenous community in Taiwan and their way of dealing with modernity. After periods of structural discrimination, the people contributed to their own well-being and cultural revitalization with multicultural learning. In recent times, networks with other communities in Southeast Asia and the Pacific region were established to foster the empowerment of traditional ecological knowledge and to develop new adequate teaching technologies.

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Article

Daniel J. O’Neil

This article explores the hypothesis of Clifford Geertz concerning the importance of essentialism (culture) and epochalism (economics) in the creation of new states. It…

Abstract

This article explores the hypothesis of Clifford Geertz concerning the importance of essentialism (culture) and epochalism (economics) in the creation of new states. It focuses on the Irish state‐building process, examining the thought of the two leaders of the 1916 rising. It finds that Patrick Pearse throughout stressed cultural revitalization and James Connolly stressed economic/social transformation. The article lends support to Geertz’s hypothesis but notes that each leader also came to appreciate the primary concern of the other.

Details

International Journal of Social Economics, vol. 26 no. 10/11
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0306-8293

Keywords

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