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Article
Publication date: 12 October 2015

Mehmet Yusuf Yahyagil

The purpose of this study is to propose a typology of culture and to present a hybrid model to be used as the base in organizational behavior and cross-cultural management…

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2543

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to propose a typology of culture and to present a hybrid model to be used as the base in organizational behavior and cross-cultural management research.

Design/methodology/approach

This study provides a conceptual analysis and general review of the literature to clarify and to classify the usage of culture models and cultural orientations to reduce confusion concerning cultural studies.

Findings

The first part of the proposed typology covers only the concept of organizational culture which has been examined around qualitative and cognitive approaches. While the second part is related to the use of socio-cultural dimensions, the third part of the proposed typology covers universal cultural orientations (patterns) framework only. The outcome of this study is the presentation of a hybrid model which provides a comprehensive methodological framework for conducting culture research.

Practical implications

The typology of culture developed in this study would be of help for researchers designing their studies on the subject of culture, socio-cultural dimensions and cultural patternings from more appropriate theoretical perspectives and methods.

Originality/value

The theoretical framework in this study provides insight in selecting more suitable culture models to examine the subject in managerial organizational studies.

Details

International Journal of Organizational Analysis, vol. 23 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1934-8835

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2005

R. Mannion, H.T.O. Davies and M.N. Marshall

To compare and contrast the cultural characteristics of “high” and “low” performing hospitals in the UK National Health Service (NHS).

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4681

Abstract

Purpose

To compare and contrast the cultural characteristics of “high” and “low” performing hospitals in the UK National Health Service (NHS).

Design/methodology/approach

A multiple case study design incorporating a purposeful sample of “low” and “high” performing acute hospital Trusts, as assessed by the star performance rating system.

Findings

These case studies suggest that “high” and “low” performing acute hospital organisations may be very different environments in which to work. Although each case possessed its own unique character, significant patternings were observed within cases grouped by performance to suggest considerable cultural divergence. The key points of divergence can be grouped under four main headings: leadership and management orientation; accountability and information systems; human resources policies; and relationships within the local health economy.

Practical implications

As with any study, interpretation of findings should be tempered with a degree of caution because of methodological considerations. First, there are the limitations of case study which proceeds on the basis of theoretical rather than quantitative generalisation. Second, organisational culture was assessed by exploring the views of middle and senior managers. While one should in no way suggest that such an approach can capture all important cultural characteristics of organisations, it is believed that it may be at least partially justified, given the agenda‐setting powers and influence of the senior management team. Finally “star” performance measures are far from a perfect measure of organisational performance. Despite such reservations, the findings indicate that organisational culture is associated in a variety of non‐trivial ways with the measured performance of hospital organisations.

Originality/value

Highlights considerable cultural divergence within UK NHS hospitals.

Details

Journal of Health Organization and Management, vol. 19 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7266

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Article
Publication date: 9 August 2011

Mehmet Yusuf Yahyagil and Ayşe Begüm Ötken

The purpose of this study is to portray societal/cultural values of Turkish people as perceived by managers and academicians. The study also aims to provide an…

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1344

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to portray societal/cultural values of Turkish people as perceived by managers and academicians. The study also aims to provide an understanding of the cultural context of the Turkish society in terms of socio‐cultural dimensions such as high and low context, monochronic vs polychronic, self‐determined, and temporal orientation.

Design/methodology/approach

Instead of using Schwartz's 56‐item questionnaire, the authors used seven cultural and ten individual dimensions as individual items. Cultural values were captured from managers' and academicians' perspectives by changing the frame of reference from self to others. The questionnaire was designed for two different age groups to find the magnitude of change in connection with cultural values.

Findings

Results indicate that Turkey can be defined as a conservative country. Hierarchy is ranked as the second most important polar dimension, and the order of cultural values indicates a reverse direction compared to the findings of similar studies with reference to European countries. It also deserves to emphasize the fact that the younger group of respondents is much more conservative and seeks more power over people and resources than the older group of respondents.

Originality/value

This paper, to some extent, may serve as a guide in reflecting today's cultural values in Turkey. It also makes a modest contribution to the relevant literature due to both the portraying cultural values of Turkish people, and the usage of methodological considerations for data collection purposes.

Details

Management Research Review, vol. 34 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-8269

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Article
Publication date: 11 June 2018

Kamal Fatehi, Jennifer L. Priestley and Gita Taasoobshirazi

Most international marketing studies, taking a sociological position, assume homogeneity within and heterogeneity between cultures. Taking a psychological position and…

Abstract

Purpose

Most international marketing studies, taking a sociological position, assume homogeneity within and heterogeneity between cultures. Taking a psychological position and based on the Mindscape Theory, the purpose of this paper is to support the hypothesis that there is intra-cultural and intra-market heterogeneity.

Design/methodology/approach

The translated survey for international use has many problems. These problems can greatly be minimized by the use of pictorial/geometric shapes that were used in this study. These shapes were constructed using redundant and non-redundant complexity, and made to be culture neutral.

Findings

Data analysis supported the presence of three of the four Mindscape types as was hypothesized, indicating individual intra-market heterogeneity in the three cultures under investigation. Additionally, the corollary hypothesis of transcultural heterogeneity was confirmed.

Research limitations/implications

It has been proposed that Mindscape types are partly innate and partly learned. What proportions constitute each part? Can the learned aspect be unlearned? Can different marketing strategies appeal to each? What marketing programs are better suited to influence the learned aspect? Future studies could explore these issues.

Practical implications

The findings of this paper have wide applicability and implications for international marketing strategy, including ways of deploying market segmentation, target marketing, positioning strategies, as well as configurations of marketing mix elements.

Originality/value

This paper used a novel and unique way for data collection and analysis. A geometric-pictorial survey was used for data collection. Data analysis was done with factor analysis and cluster analysis combined.

Details

Asia Pacific Journal of Marketing and Logistics, vol. 30 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-5855

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Article
Publication date: 10 April 2007

Judi Marshall

This paper seeks to review the potential gendering of leadership in the emerging field of corporate social responsibility (CSR). It explores whose voices are becoming…

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7120

Abstract

Purpose

This paper seeks to review the potential gendering of leadership in the emerging field of corporate social responsibility (CSR). It explores whose voices are becoming dominant, how leaders speak, and what forms men's and women's leadership take.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper is a self‐reflective inquiry, analysing observational and secondary data to explore leadership and its gender patterning. It reflects on its approach and the voice in which it is written.

Findings

Women and men are often differently placed to work within the emerging dominant logics of CSR. The gender patternings considered are skewed rather than clear‐cut. In relation to organization‐based discourses and practices, leadership is dominated by white men. Some men are tempered radicals, inside‐outsiders acting for change. Some women leaders question the foundations of business and global power relations, and point to fundamental gender inequalities. Whilst they are recognised figures, they are operating at the margins, self‐identified as activists. Other influential women provide training in the alternative practices of leadership they advocate. Systemic theories of gendering are employed to review these findings.

Originality/value

Explores some of the dynamics through which leadership can become gendered, in the challenging realm of how ecological sustainability and global social justice are addressed.

Details

Journal of Organizational Change Management, vol. 20 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0953-4814

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 2001

Gabriele Lakomski

Examines the claim that we need to change the organization’s culture if we want to bring about organizational change. Concerns itself with the mainstream conception of…

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12836

Abstract

Examines the claim that we need to change the organization’s culture if we want to bring about organizational change. Concerns itself with the mainstream conception of (organizational) culture, especially in relation to what is called “the paradox of culture”, its twin tendencies towards stability and variability. In the process, the role of the leader and organizational learning are reassessed in their purported causal interrelation. Develops the notion of culture as cognitive process based on recent research in both cultural anthropology and the new cognitive science.

Details

International Journal of Educational Management, vol. 15 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-354X

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 19 September 2008

Shu‐pel Tsai

Corporate identity has become one of the major topics in the field of corporate marketing studies, but the relationship between corporate marketing management and…

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4105

Abstract

Purpose

Corporate identity has become one of the major topics in the field of corporate marketing studies, but the relationship between corporate marketing management and corporate‐identity building seems still stuck at the stage of operational rather than strategic considerations. Corporate identity is understood largely in terms of instrumentality for enhancing competitive advantage, and corporate marketing is mostly discussed as only an execution part in representing corporate identity to the stakeholders. To address this issue, the purpose of this paper is to propose a model which explicates the strategic roles the corporate marketing manager plays in building effective corporate identity.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper explores strategic management of the corporate‐identity construction process and marketing communication management of corporate‐identity representation from the perspectives of sociology, organisational psychology and corporate marketing communication, primarily based on the narrative paradigm. Detailed theoretical exploration, coupled with several conceptual propositions as well as analyses of exemplary cases, provides academic and practical implications for corporate marketing researchers and managers.

Findings

The proposed model conceptualises that the corporate marketing manager assumes three strategic roles for building effective corporate identity: narrative coordinator to manage the narrative construction process, narrative‐network weaver to manage the narrative network, and narrative co‐author to manage the external communication programmes. These roles define the strategic relationship between corporate marketing management and corporate‐identity building.

Originality/value

The paper contributes to furthering the understanding of how to use the narrative paradigm for effective corporate‐identity building, which may help enhancement of business performance.

Details

Marketing Intelligence & Planning, vol. 26 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-4503

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1992

Robin Snell

Argues that the ways in which managers learn experientially areunnecessarily painful and will remain so without significant change inthe shape and patterning of…

Abstract

Argues that the ways in which managers learn experientially are unnecessarily painful and will remain so without significant change in the shape and patterning of organizations and the wider socioeconomic infrastructure. First identifies distinct sets of experiential learning patterns from interviews with managers and administrators in three organizations. Then discusses the barriers preventing the widespread adoption of these patterns in day‐to‐day managerial practice.

Details

Personnel Review, vol. 21 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 1992

Robin Snell

Argues that the ways in which managers learn experientially areunnecessarily painful and will remain so without significant change inthe shape and patterning of…

Abstract

Argues that the ways in which managers learn experientially are unnecessarily painful and will remain so without significant change in the shape and patterning of organizations and the wider socioeconomic infrastructure. First identifies distinct sets of experiential learning patterns from interviews with managers and administrators in three organizations. Then discusses the barriers preventing the widespread adoption of these patterns in day‐to‐day managerial practice.

Details

Management Decision, vol. 30 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1999

Stephen Jolly

This paper argues that it is possible to make a scientific analysis of the process of persuasion as a function of the language used in any social interaction rather than…

Abstract

This paper argues that it is possible to make a scientific analysis of the process of persuasion as a function of the language used in any social interaction rather than merely the context in which that interaction takes place. In other words, persuasion is a rhetorical as much as a sociolinguistic phenomenon and persuasive language in itself constitutes a distinct register or style of speech.

Details

Journal of Communication Management, vol. 4 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1363-254X

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