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Article
Publication date: 10 February 2012

Elizabeth Briody, Tracy Meerwarth Pester and Robert Trotter

The purpose of the paper is to explain the successful implementation of organizational applications, and ensuing organizational change, based on a story from a GM…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of the paper is to explain the successful implementation of organizational applications, and ensuing organizational change, based on a story from a GM manufacturing plant.

Design/methodology/approach

The approach involved collecting and analyzing the Hoist Story as part of a multi‐year ethnographic research project designed to identify the key attributes in an ideal plant culture. Through a cooperative process of co‐production, the authors worked in tandem with organizational members on issues related to organizational‐culture change.

Findings

The findings emphasize both the Hoist Story's process impact and outcome impact. The Hoist Story was a catalyst for the change process, resulting in a high level of buy‐in across the organization; as such it contrasts with much of the management literature on “planned change.” It also led to the development of several “packaged products” (e.g. a story script, video, collaboration tools) which propelled GM manufacturing culture closer to its ideal – a culture of collaboration. Using employee stories as a means to understand and drive culture change is a largely underdeveloped area of scholarship.

Originality/value

This paper provides value by bridging the gap between theory and praxis. It includes the documentation and cultural analysis of the story, but illustrates how the story evolved into specific organizational‐culture‐change applications. This “soup‐to‐nuts” approach can serve as a model for organizational researchers and change agents interested in spearheading or supporting organizational‐culture change.

Details

Journal of Organizational Change Management, vol. 25 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0953-4814

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Article
Publication date: 9 October 2009

Isabel Quiros

The purpose of this paper is to propose a theoretical model for the in‐depth study of organizations, producing a framework which makes it possible to clarify many…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to propose a theoretical model for the in‐depth study of organizations, producing a framework which makes it possible to clarify many propositions and to specifically test the theory. In order to carry out this assignment, the paper has two sub‐objectives.

Design/methodology/approach

The first one studies the adaptation of the internal culture‐structure variables as a way to determine the congruity of the components of the companies which form the real structure and to study the behavior that is expected from the people in the organization. The second sub‐aim is to analyze whether the partial adaptations of real structure mentioned above are orientated correctly towards the achievement of the strategic aims. Only a suitable design of the real structure which in turn enables the attainment of the aims raised by the strategy will give rise to the obtaining of a suitable level of efficiency.

Findings

The key contribution of the paper is to render operative in practical terms such a diffuse concept as is the alignment model.

Originality/value

Alignment theory has been combined with configuration theory to detect the ideal cultural, structural, and strategic options and making the comparison with the real forms possible in order to analyze the possible deviations and to predict the level of efficiency.

Details

International Journal of Organizational Analysis, vol. 17 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1934-8835

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Article
Publication date: 1 July 2004

Isabel Sánchez Quirós

The organizational literature accepts that when an organization generates commitment among employees through cultural mechanisms, it will be more efficient since the…

Abstract

The organizational literature accepts that when an organization generates commitment among employees through cultural mechanisms, it will be more efficient since the individuals will be involved in the attainment of the organizing objectives and will be motivated to pursue them. It is not clear, however, how organizations can generate this commitment, what constitutes its key characteristics, or what impact its use has on organizational performance. This paper therefore aims to identify the cultural practices that allow organizations to generate commitment, to analyze its impact on organizational performance, and to analyze the degree to which these practices should be used to obtain commitment. The model presented is tested in Spanish hotels, which offer a clear example of the relevance that these sorts of tools can have in the achievement of organizational objectives.

Details

Management Research: Journal of the Iberoamerican Academy of Management, vol. 2 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1536-5433

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Article
Publication date: 13 November 2017

Piet Moonen

The purpose of this paper is to address the importance of cultural values, the organizational culture and management style for innovation. It also comparatively evaluates…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to address the importance of cultural values, the organizational culture and management style for innovation. It also comparatively evaluates the actual performance of European countries in innovation.

Design/methodology/approach

In this paper, the theoretical frameworks of the well-known scholars Hofstede, House, Schwartz, Boisot and Cameron and Quinn are critically evaluated and compared with each other. In addition, the authors compared the cultural rankings and the actual performance in innovation of selected European countries. Before addressing the impact of culture on the innovative strength of nations, different definitions of innovation are being described. The theoretical framework developed on the basis of the six Hofstede dimensions is composed; the nine House dimensions are supplemented and the Schwartz values for innovative strength of nations are also being discussed. Culture as a knowledge asset, the positioning in information space and its influence on innovation following the theories of Boisot and the different cultural types as defined by Cameron and Quinn have been studied and evaluated. The performance of European countries in innovation has been evaluated on the basis of the Global Innovation Index, the patent applications to the European Patent Office and the European Innovation Scoreboard.

Findings

Based on literature review, one can conclude that there is a strong positive relation between several cultural characteristics of countries in question and their innovative strength. The results of this paper point out the importance of cultural values for innovation.

Research limitations/implications

This research has assessed the relation between national culture in general on the innovative strength of nations. Future research on which cultural characteristics and management styles have the strongest correlation with the innovative strength of nations could provide valuable insights for both scholars in this research field and for institutions and companies that wish to improve their innovative strength.

Practical implications

The results of this study provide us with the insight that the innovative strength of a nation or organization can be altered by changing (parts of) its culture. A practical implication of this finding is that a government can, for example, increase its nation’s innovative strength by encouraging cooperation between different institutions and by limiting rules and regulations which could cause barriers in the innovation process.

Social implications

A social implication of the findings of this study is the knowledge that to improve the innovative strength of a nation, a government needs to pursue a pro-active policy of transforming national culture, for example, by changing the educational system and decreasing the power distance between teachers and students. Such an effort to influence the national culture addresses interesting issues regarding the concept of social engineering.

Originality/value

By critically evaluating the qualitative cultural frameworks of several well-known scholars and relating them to quantitative statistical data about the innovative strength of nations, this study has combined the strengths of both qualitative and quantitative methodologies and produced non-trivial findings in an original manner.

Details

Journal of Organizational Change Management, vol. 30 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0953-4814

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 10 July 2018

Malene Gram, Anette Therkelsen and Jacob Roesgaard Kirkegaard Larsen

This paper aims to explore mixed emotions experienced by parents and children on holiday, how they are dealt with and how they influence the way “family” is “staged” and “done”.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to explore mixed emotions experienced by parents and children on holiday, how they are dealt with and how they influence the way “family” is “staged” and “done”.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper draws on 24 qualitative interviews with Danish parents and a questionnaire study reporting answers from 66 Danish children (11-15-year-old).

Findings

Problems external and internal to the family are identified and the latter are associated with more unease particularly among parents. This paper shows that parents invest significant narrative efforts in transcending gaps between ideals and practices. Also children are aware of the gaps between ideals and practices; they seem more matter-of-fact, however, regarding critical aspects of holidays.

Research limitations/implications

The informants of the study solely represent two-parent hetero-sexual families of Danish origin, and so inclusion of a wider range of families would have added interesting perspectives. Furthermore, children’s perspectives on critical holiday incidents need further research.

Practical implications

Creators of family holiday products and marketing should present a more nuanced imagery taking a more diverse approach to what “family” on holiday looks like. They could take up the challenge of depicting a broader range of family situations, also showing less harmonious moments, using humour, and showing opportunities for some “alone time” for both parents and children should relational overload happen. Also occasional “wifi-free” moments seem to be much appreciated by all family members, and development of offline family experiences would seem to strike a chord.

Social implications

The contemporary paradigm of intensive parenting along with strong ideals for family holidays make it essential for parents to narratively deal with and legitimize and transform less happy moments. To take pressure off contemporary families, it is important to bring to the fore the less glossy aspects of family holidays.

Originality/value

The originality of this paper is to illustrate the strong efforts applied by families to keep up a certain front to be the family that “ought to be” by nurturing and narrating positive emotions in relation to family holidays. The inclusion of children’s voices gives insights into children’s annoyance with parents’ rowing, relational overload and parents’ occasional lack of attention to children, for example through parental use of mobile phones during holiday togetherness.

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Article
Publication date: 19 January 2018

Jimena Yolanda Ramirez-Marin and Saïd Shafa

The purpose of this paper is twofold: first, to define social rewards, as acts and expressions which specifically signal respect, courtesy and benevolence to the other…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is twofold: first, to define social rewards, as acts and expressions which specifically signal respect, courtesy and benevolence to the other party, based on cultural scripts found in honor cultures. Second, to explore whether social rewards mitigate competitive aspirations and foster collaboration in competitive settings, with honor values being a culturally relevant mechanism for this effect.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper reports on two experiments assessing high-honor and low-honor culture participants’ aspirations and behavioral decisions. In study 1, participants described a personal situation where they were praised by close others (social reward) or praised themselves (control condition), before responding to a buyer/seller negotiation scenario. In study 2, participants were either complimented (social reward) or not complimented (control condition), before engaging in live competition with a confederate for monetary outcomes.

Findings

Both studies indicate that social rewards diminish competitive aspirations and offers among high-honor culture participants, but not among low-honor culture participants. Results of study 1 indicate that endorsement of honor values mediates this effect. In conclusion, social rewards can improve interactions with members of honor cultures.

Research limitations/implications

These studies advance our understanding of cultural differences in negotiations and provide insight into social rewards as one of the mechanisms necessary to successfully manage intercultural negotiations and collaboration. Future research should address the effect of social rewards on self-worth and empowerment.

Originality/value

This research is the first to shed light on the relevance and importance of social rewards as a device to facilitate social interactions in honor cultures.

Details

Cross Cultural & Strategic Management, vol. 25 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2059-5794

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Book part
Publication date: 24 September 2015

Matthew H. Rafalow

This study illustrates how youth and young adults use boundary-making processes to create a regulated community online.

Abstract

Purpose

This study illustrates how youth and young adults use boundary-making processes to create a regulated community online.

Methodology/approach

Ethnographic methods are used to compare deviance models of internet participation with work on digital youth culture.

Findings

This paper finds that digital youth draw boundaries around three categories of participation (n00bs, trolls, and idols) to identify new people who need help, ward off bullies, and uphold community ideals.

Originality/value

Contrary to deviance perspectives, this study finds that digital youth use boundary-making processes to cultivate a civil online community.

Details

Technology and Youth: Growing Up in a Digital World
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78560-265-8

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 15 May 2020

Angela Gracia B. Cruz and Margo Buchanan-Oliver

The consumer acculturation literature argues that reconstituting familiar embodied practices from the culture of origin leads to a comforting sense of home for consumers…

Abstract

Purpose

The consumer acculturation literature argues that reconstituting familiar embodied practices from the culture of origin leads to a comforting sense of home for consumers who move from one cultural context to another. This paper aims to extend this thesis by examining further dimensions in migrant consumers’ experiences of home culture consumption.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper analyses data gathered through multi-modal depth interviews with Southeast Asian skilled migrants in New Zealand through the conceptual lens of embodiment.

Findings

Building on Dion et al.’s (2011) framework of ethnic embodiment, the analysis uncovers home culture consumption as multi-layered experiences of anchoring, de-stabilisation and estrangement, characterised by convergence and divergence between the embodied dimensions of being-in-the-world, being-in-the-world with others and remembering being-in-the-world.

Research limitations/implications

This paper underscores home culture consumption in migration as an ambivalent embodied experience. Further research should investigate how other types of acculturating consumers experience and negotiate the changing meanings of home.

Practical implications

Marketers in migrant-receiving and migrant-sending cultural contexts should be sensitised to disjunctures in migrants’ embodied experience of consuming home and their role in heightening or mitigating these disjunctures.

Originality/value

This paper helps contribute to consumer acculturation theory in two ways. First, the authors show how migrants experience not only comfort and connection but also displacement, in practices of home culture consumption. Second, the authors show how migrant communities do not only encourage cultural maintenance and gatekeeping but also contribute to cultural identity de-stabilisation.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 54 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 31 August 2012

Birgit Pfau‐Effinger

The purpose of this paper is to explore how cross‐national differences in the employment rates of women with children under age three can be explained. It argues that not…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore how cross‐national differences in the employment rates of women with children under age three can be explained. It argues that not only differences in welfare‐state family policies, but also differences in the gender culture contribute to the explanation of such differences.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper outlines the theoretical approach of the “gender arrangement” which conceptualizes the ways in which family policies and culture interact, together with social and economic factors, in their impact on gendered social practices. It then analyses the differences in the employment rates of women with children under age three in six European countries, and how these are influenced by family policies, the gender culture and the labour‐market situation in the specific country, using data from international surveys as well as country case studies from an international EU‐Project.

Findings

The findings show that differences in family policies alone do not explain cross‐national differences in the employment rates of mothers with children below age three. They support the argument that an explanation requires consideration of a more complex framework of factors, to which culture certainly contributes substantially.

Originality/value

The role that culture may have in the explanation of the employment of mothers with children in contrast to the role of family policies is still a contested issue. Empirical studies which support the assumption that culture matters in this explanation are still rare. This relates particularly also to the employment of women with children below age three. In this group, cross‐national differences in these women's employment rates are particularly high. The paper introduces theoretical and methodological elaborations in this regard.

Details

International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy, vol. 32 no. 9/10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-333X

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 15 May 2017

André A. de Waal and Freke A. de Boer

There is a growing debate and research stream on the influence of national culture on the type and nature of management control systems (MCSs) used by organizations in the…

Abstract

Purpose

There is a growing debate and research stream on the influence of national culture on the type and nature of management control systems (MCSs) used by organizations in the country. A specific case is the management control of projects executed in a multicultural international environment. The purpose of this paper is to describe the findings of a study into the role of national cultures in controlling a project which a multinational undertook in four countries.

Design/methodology/approach

Based on project management control literature a theoretical MCS for international projects is developed. Subsequently, the influence of national culture on this system is discussed, using Hofstede’s cultural dimensions. Then the theoretical system is applied on the project the multinational case company executed in four countries (Austria, Finland, India, and Russia).

Findings

A key finding is that different national cultures do require different types of control, but that this effect is neutralized by the culture of the multinational which is the same all over the world and which supersedes national cultures. This makes it possible to implement a standardized project management control framework.

Originality/value

The research yielded a conceptual project management control framework which in practice seemed to be useful for controlling not only the process and progress but also the product (end result) of a project in a multicultural environment.

Details

Journal of Strategy and Management, vol. 10 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-425X

Keywords

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