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Article
Publication date: 22 May 2020

Yingwei Liu, Tao Wang, Ling Zhou and Chunyan Nie

The essence of “Chinese element” has been pinpointed as the representation of national cultural archetype resource of China, which reflects to the overall power…

Abstract

Purpose

The essence of “Chinese element” has been pinpointed as the representation of national cultural archetype resource of China, which reflects to the overall power enhancement of China. Applying the Chinese national cultural archetype resource, which will be used for promoting the Chinese Brand internationalization, aims for the consumers' approval with the hope of integrating and spreading the unique cultural advantage of Chinese brand. The recognizing of Chinese brand's cultural archetype in this paper has constituted the basis of Chinese brand's cultural archetype strategy.

Design/methodology/approach

Based on the Grounded Theory, this paper has collected and analyzed the value symbols, character images and theme stories of Chinese narrative advertisements and constructed the cultural archetype framework of Chinese brands. This paper makes a comprehensive application of Charmaz's constructivist analysis and the main axis analysis and inspection method advocated by Strauss, with the aim of building a more objective and systematic theoretical framework for the Chinese brand cultural archetype.

Findings

In this framework, it revealed: (1) Chinese brand's cultural archetype can be divided into 12 concrete archetypes according to individual's relationship with self, the other, community and nature; (2) Consumers' different ways of self-categorization are attributed as the essential difference among various archetypes. This paper also compared and analyzed the differences between Chinese and Western cultural archetypes from three perspectives, formation of social structure, pedigree of myth and character's feature.

Originality/value

This paper has certain innovative significance to the theoretical construction of the archetype of Chinese brand culture. First, based on the cultural perspective, this paper applied the cultural psychological connotation of archetype to the brand research across culture, which is more conducive to the researchers' investigation of the cultural psychology of consumers in the cross-cultural context? Second, based on the identification and comparative study of Chinese brand culture archetype, it provides a new expansion and supplement for the research on brand internationalization and globalization in emerging countries.

Details

Journal of Contemporary Marketing Science, vol. 3 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2516-7480

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Book part
Publication date: 5 January 2016

Abstract

Details

Storytelling-Case Archetype Decoding and Assignment Manual (SCADAM)
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78560-216-0

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2015

Sherman Dorn

– The purpose of this paper is to explore the professional dilemmas of historians of education in the USA.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the professional dilemmas of historians of education in the USA.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper uses historiographical analysis.

Findings

While some aspects of both “prophet” and “fool” cultural archetypes fit some historians of education, neither archetype is a useful model for discussing the possible professional positions and roles of new scholars. Instead, “border-crossing” is an appropriate metaphor for new scholars in the history of education.

Originality/value

This manuscript addresses a topic of concern to many historians of education in multiple countries. It moves beyond material concerns of intellectuals to discuss the cultural archetypes that may be at play.

Details

History of Education Review, vol. 44 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0819-8691

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Article
Publication date: 28 June 2013

Mary Louise Brown, Seonaidh McDonald and Fiona Smith

The purpose of this paper is to consider a psychoanalytic explanation for the challenges facing social entrepreneurs in Scotland.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to consider a psychoanalytic explanation for the challenges facing social entrepreneurs in Scotland.

Design/methodology/approach

A qualitative approach was used, in an exploratory study involving semi‐structured interviews with, and observation of, a purposive sample of social entrepreneurs.

Findings

Respondents exhibited a sense of splitting between the archetype of hard driving business leader and that of social reformer. One respondent was able successfully to integrate the two roles through an intuitive understanding of psychodynamic processes.

Research limitations/implications

This was an exploratory study with a small sample.

Practical implications

In a period of financial challenge for the UK economy, presenting new challenges for social enterprises, the findings add to researchers' understanding of apparently irrational responses to change.

Originality/value

There is limited research into the impact of archetypes on business behaviours and the paper aims to extend the literature.

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Article
Publication date: 16 March 2012

Amy M. Young and Mary D. Hinesly

The purpose of this paper is to provide a methodological approach to understanding key influencers of Millennials and other generational cohorts. The approach identifies…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to provide a methodological approach to understanding key influencers of Millennials and other generational cohorts. The approach identifies adults' implicit consumer preferences based on their early childhood cultural experiences.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper draws from research in the area of generational studies, implicit psychological processing, and consumer preferences to propose a method of identifying and confirming key influencers of generational cohorts' implicit preferences.

Findings

A more complete understanding of Millennials and other generational cohorts can be gleaned by complementing current methodological approaches with the one proposed in this paper.

Research limitations/implications

As preliminary research has just begun using this model, additional research is needed to confirm the theoretical work and association between early childhood influencers and actual purchasing behaviors.

Practical implications

The identification of early childhood influencers can be used by businesses for their current marketing strategies with Millennials and other generational cohorts or for product development/updates in anticipation of cohorts “aging into” target markets.

Originality/value

The approach proposed in this paper is innovative in its integration of generational cohort analysis with empirical approaches to measuring implicit consumer preferences.

Details

Journal of Consumer Marketing, vol. 29 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0736-3761

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 10 November 2011

Eunju Ko and Seulgi Lee

In “the century of culture,” a current drift is toward utilizing cultural heritage branding. Cultural heritage brand referred to in this study means a brand with value…

Abstract

In “the century of culture,” a current drift is toward utilizing cultural heritage branding. Cultural heritage brand referred to in this study means a brand with value proposition based on cultural heritage. As Asian cultures are gathering global focus amid ongoing trend of exoticism and the growth of Asian economies, there is more opportunity especially for Asian brands to benefit from cultural heritage branding. Also, the advantages of cultural heritage branding can benefit fashion brands, considering that designs of great importance in fashion brand's competitiveness can earn creativity and originality from cultural heritage.

Therefore, this study (1) profiles cultural heritage fashion brands based on Asia: Japan, China, and Korea, (2) identifies components of cultural heritage fashion branding by comparative analysis, and (3) identifies characteristics in brand management strategy from the brands, and offer managerial implications for upcoming cultural heritage fashion brands.

This study adopts a case study approach that focuses on Asian fashion brands; Issey Miyake (Japan), Shanghai Tang (China), and Damyeon designed by Lee Hye Soon (Korea). The analytical contents of this research include general profiles (i.e., brand history, brand philosophy and concept, and BI and visual representation), cultural heritage perspectives and brand management perspective (i.e., product, price, place, promotion, and brand extension). Most of the information was retrieved from multiple sources including books, academic papers, brand's annual report, brand official website, news articles, etc.

Overall, this study shows cultural heritage fashion branding can be useful in distinctiveness in positioning and delivering brand value in depth, authenticity, and credibility for customers (Urde, 2007). The findings suggest some managerial as well as cultural heritage-related indications for upcoming cultural heritage fashion brands.

Although common components of cultural heritage fashion branding (i.e., utilization of traditional prototype, emphasis on traditional fabric, and preservation of traditional craftsmanship) were drawn out, achieving optimal balance between tradition and modernity was found critical as well. Managerial guidelines include foreign brand naming, premium pricing, art-related promotions, and extension for a total lifestyle brand. In further research, the type of industry and different country-of-origins can be applied in order to extensively study about the issue of cultural heritage branding.

Details

Tourism Sensemaking: Strategies to Give Meaning to Experience
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-85724-853-4

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Article
Publication date: 7 October 2019

Markus Wohlfeil, Anthony Patterson and Stephen J. Gould

This paper aims to explain a celebrity’s deep resonance with consumers by unpacking the individual constituents of a celebrity’s polysemic appeal. While celebrities are…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to explain a celebrity’s deep resonance with consumers by unpacking the individual constituents of a celebrity’s polysemic appeal. While celebrities are traditionally theorised as unidimensional semiotic receptacles of cultural meaning, the authors conceptualise them here instead as human beings/performers with a multi-constitutional, polysemic consumer appeal.

Design/methodology/approach

Supporting evidence is drawn from autoethnographic data collected over a total period of 25 months and structured through a hermeneutic analysis.

Findings

In rehumanising the celebrity, the study finds that each celebrity offers the individual consumer a unique and very personal parasocial appeal as the performer, the private person behind the public performer, the tangible manifestation of either through products and the social link to other consumers. The stronger these constituents, individually or symbiotically, appeal to the consumer’s personal desires, the more s/he feels emotionally attached to this particular celebrity.

Research limitations/implications

Although using autoethnography means that the breadth of collected data is limited, the depth of insight this approach garners sufficiently unpacks the polysemic appeal of celebrities to consumers.

Practical implications

The findings encourage talent agents, publicists and marketing managers to reconsider underlying assumptions in their talent management and/or celebrity endorsement practices.

Originality/value

While prior research on celebrity appeal has tended to enshrine celebrities in a “dehumanised” structuralist semiosis, which erases the very idea of individualised consumer meanings, this paper reveals the multi-constitutional polysemy of any particular celebrity’s personal appeal as a performer and human being to any particular consumer.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 53 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

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Article
Publication date: 12 June 2019

Tamás Gyulavári and Erzsébet Malota

This study aims to determine cultures as personalities and investigates whether similarities or dissimilarities compared to the respondent’s own personality (actual self…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to determine cultures as personalities and investigates whether similarities or dissimilarities compared to the respondent’s own personality (actual self) are more attractive. The objectives are to identify the culture personality dimensions relevant for destination choice and to investigate the effect of congruity between perceived actual self and perceived culture personality on the evaluation of the examined cultures as ideal destinations. In this manner, numerous participants in the tourism industry may gain more specific insights into certain segments, while communication related to the specific culture can be targeted more efficiently.

Design/methodology/approach

A culture personality scale was developed by identifying the five relevant dimensions (three items in each). To measure actual self, the same 15 scale items were used. In the framework of the current research, 238 respondents evaluated the Turkish and French culture personality and their own personality.

Findings

Results show that for both cultures highly similar personality structures can be observed; incorporating dimensions such as competence, interpersonal approach, aura, life approach and rectitude. In relation to congruity theory, the authors found that the effect of the similarity between perceived culture personality and actual self is marginal. Instead, results show that the more positively culture personality is perceived relative to perceived actual self, the more positive the attitude respondents have towards cultures as destinations.

Research limitations/implications

The generalizability of the results is subject to some limitations due to the student sample.

Originality/value

Both the developed scale and the revealed effects contribute to the research field.

Details

Tourism Review, vol. 74 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1660-5373

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 28 March 2020

Pedro Vazquez, Alejandro Carrera and Magdalena Cornejo

The aim of this study is to explore and understand corporate governance patterns in family firms across Latin America. This is in response to several calls in the academic…

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this study is to explore and understand corporate governance patterns in family firms across Latin America. This is in response to several calls in the academic literature urging for more empirical studies in corporate governance in developing regions.

Design/methodology/approach

Following a configurative perspective, a hierarchical cluster analysis is applied to a sample of the 155 largest Latin American family firms.

Findings

The authors identify three main corporate governance configurations across Latin American countries. First, the exported governance model resembles many characteristics of Anglo-American and Continental Europe governance patterns of public listed control, having independence from the board of directors, and mainly hiring non-family management. Second, the super-familial governance model describes private ownership where one or multiple families control both the board of directors and the top-management team. Finally, the hybrid governance model is the largest cluster identified in the sample and combines governance characteristics of both of the foregoing configurations. This configuration exhibits ownership structured through public offerings of shares combined with leadership of the board of directors by a family member as well as moderate family influence on the board and management.

Originality/value

This is the first study to investigate corporate governance in the largest listed and privately-owned family firms in Latin America. The article extends the conversation on family firm heterogeneity and contributes to the configurative approach in the family business field by offering a cross-country perspective and identifying meaningful taxonomies that are applicable beyond national boundaries.

Details

Cross Cultural & Strategic Management, vol. 27 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2059-5794

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 2 February 2015

Richard Mesch and Stacie Comolli

The purpose of this paper is to define a new methodology for designing corporate learning for a global audience and to provide a case study of that methodology in action…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to define a new methodology for designing corporate learning for a global audience and to provide a case study of that methodology in action. The Global Learning Archetypes approach adapts well-established cultural preference models and combines them with insightful learning models. The result is three primary Global Learning Archetypes and six secondary archetypes that allow training to be designed once and used around the world.

Design/methodology/approach

The Global Learning Archetype approach was created by evaluating well-established global cultural preferences models, integrating them with a proprietary learning criteria model, and developing a model for rapidly and cost-effectively creating learning for multiple geographies. Additionally, a case study illustrates both the challenges and successes when implementing this model in a large global corporation.

Findings

Most organizations create global learning either by creating content in their “home” location and then adapting it for other locations, or by distributing a single version of content and trusting local facilitators to provide context for it. The first method is expensive and time-consuming; the second method is risky and unreliable. The Global Archetype method provides for creating learning interactions that are appropriate for multiple geographies in a single effort.

Practical implications

Most large organizations are global, and smaller organizations increasingly have a global footprint. According to Fortune Magazine, the Fortune Global 500 are headquartered in 37 different countries and do business in over 150 different countries. An Institute for the Future/Intuit study notes that by 2018, half of all US small businesses will be involved in international trade. CSA Research observes that businesses spend about US$31 billion a year on localization. A method for providing global learning in both an impactful and cost-effective way is clearly necessary.

Originality/value

The Global Learning Archetypes method is comparatively new, but it draws from well-established and well-vetted content on worldwide cultural preferences and on effective learning criteria. As such, it is a valuable synthesis of the proven and the innovative. Far more than a conceptual model, the Global Archetypes have been used by some of the largest organizations in the world; a case study of one such implementation is provided in this paper.

Details

Industrial and Commercial Training, vol. 47 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0019-7858

Keywords

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