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Article
Publication date: 8 August 2016

Crystle Martin

This paper demonstrates the impact of recognition and valuation of youth interest on potential career trajectory and future pathway choices.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper demonstrates the impact of recognition and valuation of youth interest on potential career trajectory and future pathway choices.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper presents data from two ethnographies. The first ethnography is of an online professional wrestling fan community, which took place between October 2012 and May 2013. The second ethnography is of the online Scratch community, Scratch is a free online coding program. Observations of the community took place between October 2014 and October 2015, with interviews ongoing as of the writing of this paper.

Findings

This paper details the importance of valuing youth learning and the impact that receiving recognition and valuation can have on youths’ future choices.

Research limitations/implications

This research focuses on two online communities and presents four examples of the phenomena of valuation and recognition described in the paper. To draw broad conclusions, a wider sample would be required.

Practical implications

This paper can offer examples to practitioners and researcher alike as to what the impacts of valuing youth learning in interest-driven contexts can be for youth long-term learning and career trajectory and forms that the valuation of interest to support growth and interest can take.

Originality/value

The paper demonstrates the importance of valuing learning in all parts of youths’ lives and the impact that the valuation can have on the future pathways and career trajectory of youth.

Details

On the Horizon, vol. 24 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1074-8121

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 27 September 2011

Crystle Martin

This paper aims to investigate an information literacy perspective on learning and new media, specifically virtual worlds and online affinity spaces. It aims to cover the

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Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to investigate an information literacy perspective on learning and new media, specifically virtual worlds and online affinity spaces. It aims to cover the potential of information literacy as an educational linchpin in the age of new media education.

Design/methodology/approach

This conceptual paper explores an information literacy perspective for learning and new media through previous research and prediction.

Findings

Information literacy provides a framework for addressing the explosion of information available, as well as a way to encourage self‐sufficient learners in the digital age.

Originality/value

Whereas previous studies have neglected information literacy as a lifelong skill, this paper recognizes the importance of research in virtual worlds which unveils the potential of new media as sites of learning independent from formal spaces. Recognizing the impact of information literacy on an information‐dependent society, it contributes to a body of literature about individual practices which allows for the creation of new instructional strategies.

Details

On the Horizon, vol. 19 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1074-8121

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 8 February 2016

Crystle Martin and Ryan Martinez

– The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate the impact a games-based curriculum can have on library and information science (LIS) curriculum.

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate the impact a games-based curriculum can have on library and information science (LIS) curriculum.

Design methodology approach

This is a worked example, using a case study and iterative design approach. Each iteration of this course and the reports are from the respective opinions of the instructors.

Findings

The authors found that once students looked past games as being pleasant distractions and were able to see them as both context-rich and well-designed learning environments, they were conducive in bringing games to libraries to spur interest-driven learning. Some students tackled analog and digital game design, while others would play historical games and tie those back to available books, and still others used board and video games to bring parents and their children together through play. While these findings do not dictate that this would work in all situations, presenting games and play as an inclusive practice that spans topics and interests was successful.

Research limitations andimplications

This research focuses on an LIS course and its development. Research and best practices in this course better inform future designs on how to take games-based design and interest-driven learning into broader areas to use games to spur interest and learning. The authors do not claim that our individual approaches to this class are the best methods in any course using games-based learning. Yet instructors in other fields can take what the authors learned, and the different approaches used to teaching games-based learning, and augment based on the authors’ experiences.

Practical implications

This worked example demonstrates that a games-based curriculum can help generate interest in informal learning spaces, such as in libraries.

Originality/value

The value of this paper is to emphasize the impact that games and games research can have on other disciplines. Games-based and interest-driven learning are broad enough that their usefulness in other fields is worth consideration. Libraries have been commonly looked at as “old” spaces to acquire knowledge. Combining “old” and “new” technologies to serve a more technologically savvy demographic not only helps the field of games-based learning, but also helps those in LIS how to better service a new generation of learners in collaborative relationships.

Details

On the Horizon, vol. 24 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1074-8121

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 24 September 2015

Matthew H. Rafalow

This study illustrates how youth and young adults use boundary-making processes to create a regulated community online.

Abstract

Purpose

This study illustrates how youth and young adults use boundary-making processes to create a regulated community online.

Methodology/approach

Ethnographic methods are used to compare deviance models of internet participation with work on digital youth culture.

Findings

This paper finds that digital youth draw boundaries around three categories of participation (n00bs, trolls, and idols) to identify new people who need help, ward off bullies, and uphold community ideals.

Originality/value

Contrary to deviance perspectives, this study finds that digital youth use boundary-making processes to cultivate a civil online community.

Details

Technology and Youth: Growing Up in a Digital World
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78560-265-8

Keywords

Content available
Book part
Publication date: 22 April 2021

Sandra Schamroth Abrams and Hannah R. Gerber

Abstract

Details

Videogames, Libraries, and the Feedback Loop: Learning Beyond the Stacks
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80071-505-9

Article
Publication date: 15 August 2017

Lyn Robinson and David Bawden

The purpose of this paper is to describe a new approach to education for library/information students in data literacy – the principles and practice of data collection…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to describe a new approach to education for library/information students in data literacy – the principles and practice of data collection, manipulation and management – as a part of the Masters programmes in library and information science (CityLIS) at City, University of London.

Design/methodology/approach

The course takes a socio-technical approach, integrating, and giving equal importance to, technical and social/ethical aspects. Topics covered include: the relation between data, information and documents; representation of digital data; network technologies; information architecture; metadata; data structuring; search engines, databases and specialised retrieval tools; text and data mining, web scraping; data cleaning, manipulation, analysis and visualisation; coding; data metrics and analytics; artificial intelligence; data management and data curation; data literacy and data ethics; and constructing data narratives.

Findings

The course, which was well received by students in its first iteration, gives a basic grounding in data literacy, to be extended by further study, professional practice and lifelong learning.

Originality/value

This is one of the first accounts of an introductory course to equip all new entrants to the library/information professions with the understanding and skills to take on roles in data librarianship and data management.

Details

Library Management, vol. 38 no. 6/7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-5124

Keywords

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