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Article
Publication date: 4 November 2014

Yuxiang Chris Zhao and Qinghua Zhu

The rapid development of Web 2.0 and social media enables the rise of crowdsourcing. Crowdsourcing contest is a typical case of crowdsourcing and has been adopted by many…

Abstract

Purpose

The rapid development of Web 2.0 and social media enables the rise of crowdsourcing. Crowdsourcing contest is a typical case of crowdsourcing and has been adopted by many organisations for business solution and decision making. From a participant's perspective, it is interesting to explore what motivates people to participate in crowdsourcing contest. The purpose of this paper is to investigate the category of motivation based on self-determination theory and synthesises various motivation factors in crowdsourcing contest. Meanwhile, perceived motivational affordances and task granularity are also examined as the moderate constructs.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper builds a conceptual model to illustrate the relationships between various motivations (extrinsic and intrinsic) and participation effort under the moderating of perceived motivational affordances and task granularity. An empirical study is conducted to test the research model by surveying the Chinese participants of crowdsourcing contest.

Findings

The results show that various motivations might play different roles in relating to participation effort expended in the crowdsourcing contest. Moreover, task granularity may positively moderate the relationship between external motivation and participation effort. The results also show that supporting of a participant's perceived motivational affordances might strengthen the relationship between the individual's motivation with an internal focus (intrinsic, integrated, identified and introjected motivation) and participation effort.

Originality/value

Overall, the research has some conceptual and theoretical implications to the literature. This study synthesises various motivation factors identified by previous studies in crowdsourcing projects or communities as a form of motivation spectrum, namely external, introjected, identified, integrated and intrinsic motivation, which contributes to the motivation literatures. Meanwhile, the findings indicate that various motivations might play different roles in relating to participation effort expended in the crowdsourcing contest. Also, the study theoretically extends the crowdsourcing participation research to incorporate the effects of perceived motivational affordances in crowdsourcing contest. In addition, the study may yield some practical implications for sponsors, managers and designers in crowdsourcing contest.

Details

Online Information Review, vol. 38 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1468-4527

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Article
Publication date: 19 October 2018

Wanjiang Deng, Xu Guan, Shihua Ma and Shan Liu

The online crowdsourcing has been widely applied in the practice. The purpose of this paper is to investigate the all-pay auction contest in crowdsourcing, wherein a…

Abstract

Purpose

The online crowdsourcing has been widely applied in the practice. The purpose of this paper is to investigate the all-pay auction contest in crowdsourcing, wherein a seeker posts a task online and the solvers decide whether to participate in the contest and in what extent to spend efforts on their submissions.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors specifically consider two classic contest formats: simultaneous contest and sequential contest, depending on whether the solver can observe the prior solvers’ submissions before making her own effort investment decision or not. They derive both seeker’s and solver’s equilibrium decisions and payoffs under different contest formats, and show that they vary significantly according to the number and the average skill level of solvers.

Findings

The results show that a solver would always invest more on her submission under simultaneous contest than under sequential contest, as she cannot confirm how other solvers’ submissions would be. This subsequently intensifies the market competition and brings down a solver’s average payoff under simultaneous contest. Although the simultaneous contest gives rise to a higher expected highest quality of all submissions, it also requires the seeker to spend more search cost to identify the best submission. Therefore, when the number of solvers is high or the average skill level is low, the seeker prefers sequential contest to simultaneous contest. The results also show an analogous preference over two formats for the platform.

Originality/value

This paper investigates two formats of all-pay auction contest in crowdsourcing and evaluates them from the perspective of solvers, seekers and platforms, respectively. The research offers many interesting insights which do not only explain the incentive mechanisms for solvers under different contest formats, but also make meaningful contributions to the seeker’s or the platform’s adoption strategies between two alternative contest formats in crowdsourcing practice.

Details

Industrial Management & Data Systems, vol. 119 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-5577

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Article
Publication date: 2 January 2020

Meng-Meng Wang, Jian-Jun Wang and Wan-Ning Zhang

The purpose of this paper is to explore the underlying mechanisms through which interactivity and fairness perception impart influence on solvers’ continuance intention in…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the underlying mechanisms through which interactivity and fairness perception impart influence on solvers’ continuance intention in crowdsourcing contest settings.

Design/methodology/approach

On basis of self-determination theory and social exchange theory, this study focuses on the mediating roles of motivation and platform trust to explain the underlying influence processes of interactivity and fairness perception on continuance intention. A sample of 306 solvers was obtained from an online crowdsourcing platform through two separated surveys. The hypotheses were tested using the partial least squares method and bias-corrected bootstrapping method.

Findings

The empirical results indicate that motivation and platform trust together fully mediate the effect of interactivity on continuance intention, and the effect of fairness perception on continuance intention is also fully mediated by motivation and platform trust. While motivation is found to have a stronger mediating effect than platform trust does.

Originality/value

This study contributes to the crowdsourcing research by figuring out the pathway through which interactivity and fairness perception influence solvers’ continuance intention.

Details

Online Information Review, vol. 44 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1468-4527

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 27 November 2017

Bhuminan Piyathasanan, Christine Mathies, Paul G. Patterson and Ko de Ruyter

Crowdsourcing delivers creative ideas for the issuing firm, but participants’ engagement in the creative process also creates additional benefits to firms and…

Abstract

Purpose

Crowdsourcing delivers creative ideas for the issuing firm, but participants’ engagement in the creative process also creates additional benefits to firms and participating customers. The purpose of this study is to investigate if these spill-over values endure over time. With data from two time point, i.e. at submission and after announcement of the contest winners, we examine the relationship between the degree of a participant’s creative process engagement (CPE) and value creation from a crowdsourcing contest, and how these perceptions of value change over time.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected from 154 participants in a crowdsourcing contest at two time points with an online survey: at submission, and after receiving feedback (in term of rankings, rewards, and comments) from the community. Partial Least Square path modelling was used to estimate both main and moderating effects.

Findings

CPE increases the perceived value of customers (social and epistemic value) and firms alike (knowledge-sharing intention and customer loyalty), though all but epistemic values decrease over time. Disconfirmation of expectations and need for recognition moderate these effects.

Originality/value

This paper is the first longitudinal study that helps understanding the effect of CPE on value creation from crowdsourcing across time. It also uses the theoretical lens of the honeymoon hangover effect to explain how perceived value changes. The resulting insights into the role of customer engagement in crowdsourcing contests and subsequent value creation will be beneficial to the growing research stream on consumer value co-creation and user innovation.

Details

Journal of Services Marketing, vol. 32 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0887-6045

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Article
Publication date: 26 September 2019

Jiumei Chen, Zhiying Liu, Wen Zhang and Bengang Gong

The purpose of this paper is to develop an optimal charging strategy for a third-party crowdsourcing platform.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to develop an optimal charging strategy for a third-party crowdsourcing platform.

Design/methodology/approach

Based on the auction theory, the Stackelberg game theory and the systems theory, this paper presents a new model from the perspective of risk sharing between solution seekers and the crowdsourcing platform, given the utility maximization of the seekers, the crowdsourcing platform and the solvers.

Findings

Based on the results, this study shows that the menu of fees, which includes different combinations of a fixed fee and a floating fee schedule, should be designed to attract both solution seekers and solvers. In addition, the related prize setting and the expected payoff for each party are presented.

Practical implications

This study is beneficial for crowdsourcing platform operators, as it provides a new way to design charging strategies and can help in understanding key influential factors.

Originality/value

To the best of the authors’ knowledge, this study is one of the first to simulate the interactions among the three stakeholders, thereby providing a novel model that includes a fixed fee and a floating commission.

Details

Kybernetes, vol. 49 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0368-492X

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 8 June 2015

C.K.M. Lee, CY Chan, Sophie Ho, KL Choy and WH Ip

The purpose of this paper is to explore the feasibility of adopting crowdsourcing for enhancing innovative problem solving through task design on task attributes. Task…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the feasibility of adopting crowdsourcing for enhancing innovative problem solving through task design on task attributes. Task attributes have been proven to be an important factor influencing participation and engagement of crowdworkers.

Design/methodology/approach

A survey questionnaire was developed and data from potential and experienced crowdworkers was collected and analyzed to identify the influence of task attributes on the quantity and quality of innovative solutions from crowds. This study finds that extrinsic and intrinsic motivation of task attributes are linked to psychological participation attention and the contribution of innovative solutions.

Findings

It is found that crowdsourcing projects with higher awards and recognition as extrinsic motivation is positively associated with the quantity of solution. Competitive selection with performance feedback, problems with diversity of knowledge and job autonomy with more information from sponsors are positive associate with the quality of innovative solutions. These results can complement existing research studies on how task attributes influence the performance of existing crowdworkers in crowdsourcing and can also be a starting point for analyzing potential crowdworkers’ psychological perspectives.

Originality/value

The novelty of this paper is that it illustrates the influential effects of five selected task attributes – monetary rewards and recognition, competitive selection, knowledge diversity, task complexity and autonomy – to enhance extrinsic and intrinsic motivation toward crowdsourcing feasibility in terms of quantity and quality of innovative solutions.

Details

Industrial Management & Data Systems, vol. 115 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-5577

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Book part
Publication date: 28 August 2018

Peter Robbins

In his inauguration speech of 1961, John F. Kennedy, the first Catholic and youngest-ever holder of the office of US President, famously exhorted citizens to ‘Ask not what…

Abstract

In his inauguration speech of 1961, John F. Kennedy, the first Catholic and youngest-ever holder of the office of US President, famously exhorted citizens to ‘Ask not what your country can do for you; ask what you can do for your country.’ At the time, few would have interpreted this as a call for open innovation or even citizen crowdsourcing: neither the language nor the architecture then existed for either. But the sentiment he expressed marked the beginning of a campaign of citizen engagement in developing ideas for government. It was, in effect, the first national exhortation for the crowdsourcing of ideas, and Kennedy’s words have subsequently been adapted by Jeff Howe for the modern crowdsourcing context.

Citizen crowdsourcing is now well-established. This chapter sets out to assess how successful it has been as a mechanism for finessing original and meaningful ideas that advance social goals. We look briefly at leading examples of crowdsourcing for social good. We also look at the underlying factors that support it, including the knowledge and input solicited from the crowd; the crowd’s willingness to participate; and the mechanisms through which the crowd can engage. We trace the idea and practice of crowdsourcing back to Socrates in ancient Athens. We look at prosocial behaviour, exploring selected annals of public intellectuals, including Emerson. We examine citizen science as a forerunner of crowdsourcing, then move into the business strategy of open innovation and, finally, we arrive at crowdsourcing for social good in various guises. In conclusion, we explore what has been learned from initiatives that can now be considered current best practice in this area.

Details

Exploring the Culture of Open Innovation
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78743-789-0

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Article
Publication date: 23 October 2020

Wei Wu and Xiang Gong

Crowdworkers' sustained participation is critical to the success and sustainability of the online crowdsourcing community. However, this issue has not received adequate…

Abstract

Purpose

Crowdworkers' sustained participation is critical to the success and sustainability of the online crowdsourcing community. However, this issue has not received adequate attention in the information systems research community. This study seeks to understand the formation of crowdworker sustained participation in the online crowdsourcing community.

Design/methodology/approach

The research model was empirically tested using online survey data from 212 crowdworkers in a leading online crowdsourcing community in China.

Findings

The empirical results provide several key findings. First, there are two different types of sustained participation: continuous participation intention (CPI) and increased participation intention (IPI). Second, extrinsic motivation and intrinsic motivation positively influence crowdworker CPI and IPI. Third, community commitment negatively moderates the effects of extrinsic motivation on CPI and IPI, while it positively moderates the effects of intrinsic motivation on CPI and IPI.

Originality/value

This study has significant implications for research on online crowdsourcing community and provides practical guidance for formulating persuasive measures to promote crowdworker sustained participation in the community.

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Abstract

Details

Platform Economics: Rhetoric and Reality in the ‘Sharing Economy’
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78743-809-5

Content available
Article
Publication date: 16 October 2017

Rita Faullant, Johann Fueller and Katja Hutter

Companies are discovering the power of crowdsourcing as a source of new ideas for products and services. It is assumed that the personal engagement and the continuous…

Abstract

Purpose

Companies are discovering the power of crowdsourcing as a source of new ideas for products and services. It is assumed that the personal engagement and the continuous involvement with a company’s products or services over a period of several weeks positively affect participants’ loyalty intentions toward the host companies. The research leads the authors to challenge this assumption. In addition to mere participation in crowdsourcing initiatives, the authors argue that perceptions of fairness will explain changes in customer relationship-related consequences such as loyalty, perceived innovativeness and product interest. The paper aims to discuss these issues.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors analyzed a real-life crowdsourcing contest launched by a leading lighting manufacturer and investigated the impact of two fairness dimensions (distributive and procedural) on participants’ future behavioral and attitudinal intentions (n=121). The analysis was performed with SEM.

Findings

The results suggest that fairness perceptions are significantly related to evoked product interest, perceived innovativeness and loyalty intentions. The analysis reveals that the influence of the fairness dimensions is asymmetric: while distributive fairness can be considered as a basic factor that must be fulfilled in order to avoid negative behavioral consequences, procedural fairness instead is an excitement factor that causes truly positive behavioral consequences.

Research limitations/implications

The results are particularly relevant for companies launching a crowdsourcing competition under their own brand name, and for broadcasting platforms. For companies with no relations to end-users, these findings may not be as relevant.

Practical implications

Organizers of crowdsourcing contests should be aware that such initiatives can be a double-edged sword. Fair Play is a must to gain the positive effects from crowdsourcing initiatives for both new product development and the customer relationship. For companies lacking the capabilities to manage crowdsourcing initiatives professionally it is advisable to rely on intermediary broadcasting platforms.

Originality/value

The research is the first to investigate systematically the consequences of fairness perceptions in a real-life crowdsourcing idea contest. The authors demonstrate the asymmetric nature of fairness perceptions on three different outcome variables that are important for the customer relationship.

Details

Management Decision, vol. 55 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

Keywords

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