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1 – 10 of over 2000
Article
Publication date: 5 October 2018

Jose M. Barrutia, Alexander Velez and Carmen Echebarria

This paper aims to study the moderating effect of customer type (business customers versus private customers) on the link between two forms of openness (cross-industry

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to study the moderating effect of customer type (business customers versus private customers) on the link between two forms of openness (cross-industry networks and customer integration) and two front-end innovation outcomes (a creative idea and a product definition), in the context of radical innovations.

Design/methodology/approach

An agreement was established with the Statistical Office of the Basque Government. This agreement enabled us to access a reliable list of innovative companies in the region that constituted our sample frame. Questionnaires were collected by phone. The response rate was 41.6%, which led to a sample size of 189 firms. Structural equation modeling was used to analyze the data.

Findings

The study reveals that idea creativity is explained by different external drivers in business-to-business (B2B) and business-to-customer (B2C) settings. In B2B settings, customer integration is found to have no effect on idea creativity. For product definition, however, both the external drivers, namely, cross-industry networks and customer integration, matter, although the latter is more salient.

Practical implications

In the search for creative ideas, managers of firms that serve business customers should focus on cross-industry networks, while those that serve private customers should concentrate on customer integration.

Originality/value

Most previous quantitative studies on the front end have focused on internal drivers, and some of them use a mix of B2B and B2C data, which could lead to misleading conclusions.

Details

Journal of Business & Industrial Marketing, vol. 34 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0885-8624

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 2 January 2007

Mona Pearl

As organizations become more global in their reach, their people and tools have to reflect more expansive capabilities. Innovative organizations hire leaders and team…

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Abstract

Purpose

As organizations become more global in their reach, their people and tools have to reflect more expansive capabilities. Innovative organizations hire leaders and team members who possess cross‐industry knowledge. This is one of the keys to dealing with the rapid change and ambiguity of today's business environment. These individuals are adept at transferring successful experiences, processes and tools from other industries in order to develop and sustain a competitive advantage.

Design/methodology/approach

The article discusses examples of senior executives who have successfully crossed industry boundaries, suggests ways of identifying talent that will succeed upon switching industries and gives examples of processes and technologies that have been applied across industry boundaries.

Findings

Specialization in a particular industry is unnecessary, particularly at the leadership level. Senior executives who have been leaders in more than one industry have been highly successful. Processes and technologies from one industry have led to innovative approaches in another.

Practical implications

Companies should hire talent that has proven its flexibility and adaptability by switching industries. They should also look outside their own industry for innovation in the area of processes and technologies. Hiring from outside the industry can also help avoid trade secret litigation.

Originality/value

The article suggests cross‐industry knowledge and application as criteria for success.

Details

Business Strategy Series, vol. 8 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1751-5637

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 6 June 2016

Stefano Ciliberti, Laura Carraresi and Stefanie Bröring

The purpose of this paper is twofold: first, it aims to investigate how internal and external drivers affect innovation in the Italian food industry. Second, the authors…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is twofold: first, it aims to investigate how internal and external drivers affect innovation in the Italian food industry. Second, the authors are interested to understand to what extent these drivers are industry specific, and therefore, they are contrasted against those relevant for the pharmaceutical industry in Italy according to the increasing growth of cross-industry innovation between these two sectors. The paper aims, thus, to shed light on the differences between food and pharmaceutical industries in terms of innovation drivers to understand potential precursors of emerging industry convergence.

Design/methodology/approach

Both probit and bivariate probit models are estimated, using data from the Italian Community Innovation Survey, in order to provide empirical evidence on drivers affecting innovation in the food and pharmaceutical industries.

Findings

The innovation activity of Italian food and pharmaceutical companies strongly relies on the presence of in-house R & D activities. Whereas firms in the pharmaceutical industry combine both internal and external R & D activities and knowledge sources to produce innovation, the case of the food industry is strongly dependent on the acquisition of external technology. In particular, the increased need for absorptive capacity of both sectors emphasises the key role of university research for collaboration, knowledge transfer and product innovation.

Research limitations/implications

The paper gives insights not only on drivers for innovation, but especially on the industry-specific differences which should be taken into account to have a contingent view. Limitations concern the impossibility to perform panel data analysis, due to the design of the database. Furthermore, both food and pharmaceutical sub-samples are not completely representative, since large companies tend to be overrepresented.

Practical implications

This paper provides managerial insights concerning the internal and external drivers affecting innovation. Moreover, it raises awareness as regards the possible differences between the food and pharmaceutical industries, which is crucial for establishing successful pathways for cross-industry innovation.

Originality/value

This study represents one of the few attempts to compare the innovation drivers of two manufacturing sectors (food and pharmaceutical), increasingly involved in cross-industry collaborations, and to highlight the industry-specific differences in those drivers which can act as forerunners of this phenomenon.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 118 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 12 August 2020

Zhi Li, Jiuchang Wei, Dora Vasileva Marinova and Jingjing Tian

This paper aims to explore the explanations of “information effect” and “agency effect” of corporate diversification with cross-industry knowledge under a crisis situation.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to explore the explanations of “information effect” and “agency effect” of corporate diversification with cross-industry knowledge under a crisis situation.

Design/methodology/approach

Based on an event study of 203 public companies’ crises in China between 2008 and 2018, the authors verify the information and agency effects of corporate diversification under a crisis situation by, respectively, examining the effects of interactions of corporate unrelated diversification with corporate transparency and knowledge deficiency attribution on the stock market’s responses to the crises.

Findings

It is found that corporate unrelated diversification serves as a buffer in protecting firm value while attribution of knowledge deficiency can be a burden. The buffering effect is stronger when the corporate transparency is higher but weaker when the crisis is attributed to be caused by corporate tacit knowledge deficiency.

Practical implications

Unrelated diversified firms should strengthen information communication with stakeholders so as to break down the stakeholders’ cross-industry knowledge barriers, and thus protect their own value at the crisis’ onset. Also, they can further buffer the loss by reducing stakeholders’ perceptions of the corporate tacit knowledge deficiency revealed in the crisis.

Originality/value

This study is the first to illustrate that the information and agency effects of corporate diversification strategy can be partially explained under a crisis situation, which provides meaningful insights about how firms can conduct knowledge management in their daily operations to deal better with corporate crises.

Details

Journal of Knowledge Management, vol. 25 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1367-3270

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 3 July 2020

Erika Sydney-Hilton and Natalia Vila-López

This paper aims to analyze if the relevance of marketing strategies is the same across 11 industries.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to analyze if the relevance of marketing strategies is the same across 11 industries.

Design/methodology/approach

To reach these objectives, secondary information about 500 companies operating in the USA was analyzed. This information was listed on the US Standard & Poor’s 500-company index (SPX Charts, n.d.), and this information was collected for eight different periods (from 2009 to 2016). In addition, to do a cross-industry analysis, data was collected for 11 different industries. Multiple regression analysis and ANOVA test were applied.

Findings

The results lead us to conclude that marketing strategies vary according to industry.

Originality/value

The added value of this paper is that it elaborates on the marketing-accounting interface to bridge the existing gap. A cross-industry comparison is added while previous research has mainly analyzed specific results for a particular sector. This suggests more accurate valuation techniques for marketers, executives and other stakeholders.

Details

Journal of Business & Industrial Marketing, vol. 36 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0885-8624

Keywords

Case study
Publication date: 23 June 2021

Arpita Agnihotri and Saurabh Bhattacharya

Case can be taught at the undergraduate or postgraduate level, including executive Master of Business Administration programs.

Abstract

Study Level/Applicability

Case can be taught at the undergraduate or postgraduate level, including executive Master of Business Administration programs.

Subject Area

This case is intended for courses in strategic management, entrepreneurship and innovation at the undergraduate or postgraduate level.

Case Overview

The case is about challenges faced by Linda Portnoff, the Co-founder and Chief Executive Officer of Riteband, a Sweden-based fintech startup. In March 2020, Portnoff was conducting beta testing of Riteband’s app, which experts considered the world’s first stock exchange for music trading. After completing a PhD, Portnoff who was working as a Research Analyst, left her job to pursue entrepreneurship. Through Riteband, Portnoff helped to resolve pain points of artists who were forced to give the copyright of their music tracks or albums to distributors, in lieu of funds or promotional campaigns that distributors arranged for them. Portnoff invested in developing a patent-pending machine learning-based algorithm that based on several parameters could predict the likelihood of a music track or an album to become a success. Based on this prediction and royalty that artists were interested in sharing with fans, shares were issued to investors, who were also fans of the artists. As Portnoff identified an innovative business opportunity to trade music on a stock exchange based on Riteband’s machine learning algorithm, competition in Riteband’s strategic group was also becoming intense. Consequently, Portnoff was facing challenges of establishing competitive advantage of Riteband. Furthermore, as women in general faced challenges in raising funds for their startups, and even though Portnoff obtained some funding for Riteband, but overall, funding was a challenge for her as well. Moreover, as machine learning was a technical aspect for artists and potential investors, Portnoff also faced challenges to monetize on its machine learning algorithm.

Expected learning outcomes

By the end of the case study discussion, students should be able to: understand the principles of cross-industry innovation and explain the creation of new business opportunities based on cross-industry innovation; differentiate between direct and indirect competitors through strategic group analysis and further critically analyze the competitive advantage of business over other direct competitors; determine ways of reducing gender biases in venture capital funding; describe how machine learning works and further formulate ways to monetize a business through machine learning; and demonstrate the application of the value proposition canvas and business model canvas.

Subject codes

CSS 3: Entrepreneurship; CSS 11: Strategy.

Article
Publication date: 7 August 2009

Cortney C. McDermott

The purpose of this paper is to establish the feasibility and benefits of forming a cross‐industry corporate sustainability association, Corporate 21, comprised of leading…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to establish the feasibility and benefits of forming a cross‐industry corporate sustainability association, Corporate 21, comprised of leading reputable corporations around the world.

Design/methodology/approach

Such an association would require an even reporting structure and a formal sustainability agenda – Corporate Agenda 21. In determining the latter, this paper drew initiatives from 12 current cross‐industry corporate social responsibility (CSR) reports; inclusion is based on repeated findings and potential global application of initiative.

Findings

It is debated that such an association would serve to further strengthen the role of business in the modern sustainability and CSR movement, insofar as it would offer increased cross‐industry collaboration through a collective plan of action in the field.

Research limitations/implications

The paper would benefit from a broader range of CSR report analysis, including all reports from leading corporations in fields of CSR, sustainability and innovation. A subsequent study should also develop a benchmarking system for all Corporate Agenda 21 initiatives.

Practical implications

A unified sustainability blueprint and shared cross‐industry CSR collaboration would provide the most beneficial plan of action for business by working: first, reverse the image “corporate” has globally; second, offer money‐saving solutions and healthy profit attainment at the heart of its programs; third, allow companies to supersede inevitable governmentally imposed environmental and social regulations; fourth, create inter‐company synergy through effective global intent; provide member corporations with a competitive market advantage; and finally, foster an innovative business environment.

Originality/value

Such an association would provide a new forum from which business would have increased understanding and greater leverage in social and environmental responsibility and innovation.

Details

Corporate Communications: An International Journal, vol. 14 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1356-3289

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 August 2006

G. Ronald Gilbert and Cleopatra Veloutsou

This paper seeks to identify service satisfaction measures that can be used across industries.

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Abstract

Purpose

This paper seeks to identify service satisfaction measures that can be used across industries.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper attempts to identify empirically core characteristics of customer satisfaction ratings across six industries based on the ratings of 10,835 respondents within the USA. The industries included are banking and finance, retail, government, grocery stores, hospitality/sports, and restaurants.

Findings

The paper finds that banking and finance and hospitality/sports entertainment were rated highest by their patrons. Those dealing with government, general retail and moderately priced fast food restaurants received lower service satisfaction ratings. Differences were also found among respondent characteristics (i.e. age, gender, education and ethnicity/race).

Research limitations/implications

The study sample was selected from organizations readily available to the research team. Future studies based on systematic random samples would enhance the generalizability of the findings.

Originality/value

The results provide a basis from which cross industry benchmarking and the identification of best practices can be captured and used by practitioners.

Details

Journal of Services Marketing, vol. 20 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0887-6045

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 22 April 2004

Dale Young and John Benamati

This study examines how the Fortune 500 use transactional public Web sites (TPWS). It applies innovation diffusion theory to identify variables and construct a model to…

Abstract

This study examines how the Fortune 500 use transactional public Web sites (TPWS). It applies innovation diffusion theory to identify variables and construct a model to explain differences in adoption rates of TPWS across industries. The study finds high rates of TPWS adoption in the airline, computer and office equipment, commercial banking, and retailing industries. The study also explains why the rates of TPWS adoption vary across different industries. Characteristics of both the innovation and the industry’s environment affect TPWS adoption. A high level of TPWS adoption is associated with industries where: products, services, and sales processes “fit” electronic transactions, the level of price competition is extreme, competitors are aggressively adopting the same technology, and firms are experienced with related technologies and have already developed the necessary information technology infrastructure. The study is significant because it identifies the specific innovation and environmental characteristics that drive varying rates of TPWS adoption among large firms across different industries.

Details

American Journal of Business, vol. 19 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1935-5181

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 27 April 2012

Joanna McDonald and Isabella Crawford

This paper aims to analyse the post‐crisis communication response of the UK oil industry both from a management and employee perspective following two major helicopter…

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Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to analyse the post‐crisis communication response of the UK oil industry both from a management and employee perspective following two major helicopter incidents in 2009. The purpose of this paper is to develop further understanding of the merits of a cross‐industry post‐crisis communication strategy for certain crisis types.

Design/methodology/approach

This research is a single case study focusing on the Helicopter Task Group (HTG). Thirteen members of the HTG were interviewed and 250 questionnaires distributed to the workforce. Results were analysed against a literature review of current post‐crisis communication theory.

Findings

The study demonstrates that where a crisis is deemed to genuinely cross company boundaries, an inter‐organisational approach to post‐crisis communications is of mutual benefit to all stakeholders, providing certain conditions for dialogue are met.

Research limitations/implications

This paper only focuses on one crisis event. Further research is required with other inter‐organisational groups formed to lead a cross‐industry response to a crisis.

Practical implications

This case study provides a model for cross‐industry pre‐crisis planning and post‐crisis renewal strategy where the aim is not to attribute blame, but to respond to a wider community of concerns and issues that are deemed to cross company and institutional boundaries.

Originality/value

The research demonstrates that the process of rebuilding stakeholder relationships and renewal is possible prior to any formal attribution of blame or apology.

Details

Corporate Communications: An International Journal, vol. 17 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1356-3289

Keywords

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