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Article

Isabella Maggioni, Sean James Sands, Carla Renee Ferraro, Jason Ian Pallant, Jessica Leigh Pallant, Lois Shedd and Dewi Tojib

For consumers, cross-channel behaviour is increasingly prevalent. Such behaviour involves consumers actively engaging in (and deriving benefit) from one channel during a…

Abstract

Purpose

For consumers, cross-channel behaviour is increasingly prevalent. Such behaviour involves consumers actively engaging in (and deriving benefit) from one channel during a product search but switching to another channel when making a purchase. Drawing on multi-attribute utility theory, this study proposes a cross-channel behaviour typology consisting of three key aspects: channel choice behaviour, functional and economic outcomes and consumer-specific psychographic and demographic variables.

Design/methodology/approach

Segmentation analysis conducted via latent class analysis (LCA) was performed on a sample of 400 US consumers collected via an online survey.

Findings

Cross-channel behaviour is not always intentional. We identify a specific segment of consumers that most often engage in unplanned, rather than intentional, cross-channel switching. We find that of all shoppers that engage in cross-channel behaviour, a fifth (20%) are forced to switch channels at the point of purchase.

Practical implications

Cross-channel behaviour can be mitigated by retailers via a deep understanding of the driving factors of different configurations of showrooming and webrooming.

Originality/value

In contrast with existing conceptualisations, this study suggests that cross-channel behaviour often stems from consumers being “forced” by factors outside of their control, but within the retailers' control. This research presents a nuanced approach to decompose consumer cross-channel behaviour from the consumer perspective as planned, forced or opportunistic.

Details

International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 48 no. 12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

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Article

Alex Wang

This paper aims to examine the effect of cross‐channel integration of an advertiser's television spot that invited viewers to play an online game and web site that…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examine the effect of cross‐channel integration of an advertiser's television spot that invited viewers to play an online game and web site that featured the game on consumers' perceived media engagement and brand attitudes. An important factor, personal involvement is also to be examined.

Design/methodology/approach

In total, 185 college students participate in an experimental study on participation and involvement. Participants fill out surveys and personal involvement is determined using various advertisements.

Findings

The results reveal that interaction effects are evident between cross‐channel integration of advertising and personal involvement on media engagement and brand attitudes.

Research limitations/implications

This study is limited, investigating only one brand, one product category, and two media that can feature advertising messages regarding cross‐channel integration. Future studies should investigate the cross‐channel integration effect on different segments of target consumers.

Practical implications

Advertisers should consider enhancing their media strategies. In particular, advertisers should manage a media plan that includes specific sets of contacts to enhance the effects of cross‐channel integration of advertising.

Originality/value

The paper helps substantiate the strategic value of cross‐channel integration of advertising on branding by assessing the value of cross‐channel integration of advertising.

Details

Management Research News, vol. 32 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0140-9174

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Article

Patrali Chatterjee

The purpose of this paper is to examine the role of consumer shopping orientations on consumer's channel choice, cross‐channel shopping behavior, and shopping outcomes.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the role of consumer shopping orientations on consumer's channel choice, cross‐channel shopping behavior, and shopping outcomes.

Design/methodology/approach

Using multiple sources of data including surveys of store, web, and cross‐channel shoppers and their transaction information, the impact of consumer shopping orientations on comparison‐shopping, likelihood of cross‐channel usage, purchase outcomes including unplanned purchasing, retailer satisfaction, intent to return/abandon purchases, and share of category purchases are investigated.

Findings

Results suggest that high‐thrift customers patronizing a cross‐channel retailer are less likely to search for competitive offerings online or offline than customers patronizing a multiple channel retailer. Further, retailer satisfaction is higher for cross‐channel compared to multi‐channel retailers irrespective of the transaction channel used by consumers.

Research limitations/implications

The data have external validity; however, they lack the control possible in laboratory experiments. Future research should examine if the findings can be replicated in multiple retail sectors.

Practical implications

These results suggest that brick‐and‐click retailers can exploit synergies between their channels through order online and pick up in store strategies for greater profitability than those who operate multiple independent channels.

Originality/value

This paper examines managerial implications of multiple independent channel vs cross‐channel strategies by retailers using data from customers of a commercial retailer.

Details

Marketing Intelligence & Planning, vol. 28 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-4503

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Article

Yunjeong Kim and Yuri Lee

The purpose of this study was to investigate whether consumers differ in their online or offline purchase intention, depending on which channel with price promotion…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study was to investigate whether consumers differ in their online or offline purchase intention, depending on which channel with price promotion information they are first exposed to, and to analyse the moderating role of brand trust.

Design/methodology/approach

Overall, 174 responses were obtained via an online survey using two contact channels (online/offline) by two levels of brand trust (high/low) between-subject designs.

Findings

Spillover effects were found across channels when a consistent price promotion is executed in both online and offline channels, purchase intentions for cross-channel and contact channel increase simultaneously. Although there was a similar effect in the discrepancy of purchase intentions towards the cross-channel according to contact channels, it varied depending on brand trust. When brand trust is high, having contact with offline price-discount information has a large online spillover effect. When brand trust is low, the spillover effect from online to offline is large.

Research limitations/implications

This study expands the multi-channel research by proving the spillover effects between channels and confirming the difference according to brand trust.

Practical implications

Increasing promotion information for online contact is effective in driving offline visits for new brands, and the effective use of promotion information at offline stores can have a positive impact on online channels for well-known brands.

Originality/value

This study explores the cross-channel spillover effect of price promotion and proves that these effects depend on brand trust.

Details

International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 48 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

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Article

Niall Piercy

Purchasing behaviour across traditional retail and internet routes to market is becoming increasingly integrated. The positive and negative consequences of such behaviour…

Abstract

Purpose

Purchasing behaviour across traditional retail and internet routes to market is becoming increasingly integrated. The positive and negative consequences of such behaviour for multi‐channel businesses have not been thoroughly examined – while an offline retail presence may reassure customers purchasing from an online channel, poor service online may negatively influence customer usage of an offline channel. This paper aims to address this issue.

Design/methodology/approach

A questionnaire survey of the online customers of four companies is employed and structural equation modelling used to investigate influences of demographic and behavioural variables (purchase involvement, loyalty, experience with the internet, company and product‐type) on positive and negative cross‐channel behaviour (CCB).

Findings

Strong evidence for both positive and negative customer CCB is found. Females, higher purchase involvement, higher loyalty and those with more experience of the company were more likely to display positive CCB; higher education, experience with the product type and online channel negatively influenced positive CCB. Increased age, education, occupation/class and purchase involvement lead to more negative CCB; product and company experience lead to reduced levels of negative CCB.

Research limitations/implications

As a first step towards understanding of customer CCB the research generates many insights; however, more research is required to explore in more depth each of the constructs discussed and measured.

Practical implications

Understanding how different customer groups display different tendencies for CCB can help companies shape fulfilment and delivery strategies across different channels to market.

Originality/value

The study makes contributions to customer cross‐channel customer behaviour, developing implications for future research as well as management practice.

Details

Marketing Intelligence & Planning, vol. 30 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-4503

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Article

Abena Animwaa Yeboah-Banin and Kwaku Krobea Asante

For many developing country citizens, traditional herbal medicines offer affordable alternatives to expensive orthodox options. Consumers learn about them from different…

Abstract

Purpose

For many developing country citizens, traditional herbal medicines offer affordable alternatives to expensive orthodox options. Consumers learn about them from different sources including the packaging, which by regulatory demands must provide certain information. In countries such as Ghana, many herbal medicine brands combine packaging information with radio presenter mentions (PMs) as the primary modes of advertising. The purpose of this study is to compare radio PMs of herbal medicines to their packaging information to see how consistent they are in providing credible information to consumers.

Design/methodology/approach

The study uses comparative qualitative content analysis to compare information about disease indications, directions for use and warnings/cautions as provided on the packaging and in PMs to gauge the extent of their congruence.

Findings

Findings show that there are substantial cross-channel message differences. These differences range from under-representation to sometimes, blatant misinformation, suggesting the possibility that audiences will have difficulty relying on them for decisions.

Research limitations/implications

This study only addressed issues with the manifest content of herbal drugs’ packaging and PMs. It does not include any interviews with consumers to gauge the extent of their consciousness of the lapses identified, and how they are affected by such. In addition, the study sample is context-specific. Ghana presents an interesting setting for the study but it is none-the-less only one country, denying us the power to generalize the findings.

Practical implications

The study points to a need to pay closer attention to message salience and consistency where multiple channels are used in promoting herbal medicinal products. Due to their historically traditional context of consumption in many developing countries, regulatory frameworks on herbal medicine markets are often lax. This study calls attention to a need for better policing on how herbal medicinal products promote themselves, particularly where they use multiple media channels that introduce variations into their messages.

Originality/value

The study calls attention to the credibility of cross-channel messages in supporting consumers of medicinal products. Secondly, because of the predominance of the normative view in medical advertising, channels such as PMs that accommodate message variation and improvisation have eluded critical analysis. By its focus on the presenter mention advertising format, the study also draws attention of health communication scholars to begin to include emerging modes of medical advertising in their analysis.

Details

International Journal of Pharmaceutical and Healthcare Marketing, vol. 14 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-6123

Keywords

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Article

Jae Youn Chang and Wi-Suk Kwon

This study aims at examining the role of the e-store brand personality congruence/incongruence of a multichannel apparel retailer in the formation of consumers' perceived…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims at examining the role of the e-store brand personality congruence/incongruence of a multichannel apparel retailer in the formation of consumers' perceived e-store brand fit and e-store patronage intention, based on the concept of image congruence.

Design/methodology/approach

An online survey was conducted with a US national sample of 458 female consumers (20–50 years old) who had shopped for clothing online.

Findings

Results revealed that e-store brand personality incongruence in three personality dimensions had a negative impact on consumers' e-store patronage intention directly as well as indirectly by reducing the consumers' global perception of the e-store brand fit. Further, the retailer's relevance to the consumer moderated the relationship between the perceived e-store brand fit and e-store patronage intention in that this relationship was significantly greater among consumers with a high (vs low) perceived self-relevance of the retail brand.

Practical implications

The findings highlight the importance of symbolically integrated cross-channel brand management for multichannel apparel retailers by clearly identifying their brand personality and carefully crafting it into their e-store interface design and e-store visual merchandising to convey the brand personality.

Originality/value

This study expands the application of image congruence to the cross-channel image congruence phenomenon in multichannel retailing environments by examining the e-store brand image congruence employing both direct and indirect approaches.

Details

Journal of Fashion Marketing and Management: An International Journal, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1361-2026

Keywords

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Book part

Selen Öztürk and Abdullah Okumuş

Nowadays companies are constantly changing their retail settings and strategies to keep up with technological developments and consumer needs. Digital transformation…

Abstract

Nowadays companies are constantly changing their retail settings and strategies to keep up with technological developments and consumer needs. Digital transformation enabled one’s shopping experience to be more efficient in terms of money, time, physical effort and other elements that determine the price a consumer has to pay. Channels of communication and distribution have evolved, increased in number and also became integrated. Mobile devices, mobile applications and location services help consumers in their shopping journey. These developments have led us to a new concept called omni-channel management. In theory, the omni-channel refers to a single and unified channel experience with multiple touchpoints, which include physical stores, online stores and direct marketing; mass communication channels (television, radio, print media, C2C, etc.), online channels (social media, search engines, comparison sites, e-mail, display etc.) and mobile channels (SMS, branded apps, etc.). Some examples of omni-channel practices are click-reserve, click-collect, tablets as in-store sales tools, in-store product order through mobile apps, etc.

In this chapter, the latest trends in marketing channels are discussed with enabling digital technologies and relevant success factors. Challenges and opportunities in implementing omni-channel strategies and several omni-channel initiatives from Turkey are reported.

A research was employed to present consumers’ preferences of touchpoints/channels for search, payment and delivery, and to find out the drivers that lead consumers to use more than one channel simultaneously and/or interchangeably in a buying process. The results will guide the readers to understand consumer behaviour in the new omni-channel world.

Details

Marketing Management in Turkey
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-558-0

Keywords

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Article

Guangling Zhang, Chenchen Liu and Hui Wang

Currently, the issues of cross-channel integration (CCI) have become the attentive focus. However, little research based on institutional theory details the drivers of and…

Abstract

Purpose

Currently, the issues of cross-channel integration (CCI) have become the attentive focus. However, little research based on institutional theory details the drivers of and obstacles to adopt CCI strategy. Combined with resource-based view (RBV) and institutional theory, this thesis studies the effect of institutional pressures on the manufactures' extent of CCI, through exploring the moderating effects of firm's technology competence and relationship governance capabilities on the relationship between institutional pressures and the extent of CCI.

Design/methodology/approach

The survey data of 249 valid research samples were obtained from Chinese manufacturing enterprises. Statistical software such as SPSS 22.0 and AMOS 18.0 was used to analyze the data and test the conceptual model and relevant research hypotheses from an empirical perspective.

Findings

The results of empirical study from 249 manufacturers indicate that the mimetic, coercive and normative pressures perceived by enterprises can significantly promote their extent of CCI; relationship governance capabilities attenuate the positive impact of mimetic pressures on the extent of CCI, but strengthen that of normative pressures on the extent of CCI; besides, technology competence can attenuate the positive effect of mimetic pressures on the extent of CCI, but enhance that of normative pressures on the extent of CCI.

Originality/value

Few studied the impact of the interaction of internal capabilities and external institutional pressures on CCI of enterprises. This study combines institutional theory and resource-based view to fill the theoretical gap in this regard.

Details

Journal of Contemporary Marketing Science, vol. 3 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2516-7480

Keywords

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Abstract

Details

Marketing Management in Turkey
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-558-0

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