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Article
Publication date: 12 September 2008

Harri Lorentz

The management of international supply chains may significantly contribute to the successful outcome of exports. The purpose of this paper is to investigate the level of…

Abstract

Purpose

The management of international supply chains may significantly contribute to the successful outcome of exports. The purpose of this paper is to investigate the level of supply chain collaboration in an uncertain cross‐border context, and whether it improves supply chain performance. The moderating role of export experience and intensity to the collaboration‐performance relationship is also investigated.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper draws on a survey of Finnish industrial companies with Russian exports. Correlation and regression analysis is used in investigating causal relationships.

Findings

The results weakly support the hypothesised positive relationships of collaboration and performance in the chosen cross‐border context. It seems that experience in cross‐border supply chain operations does not guarantee success in supply chain management. However, those companies with large export volumes, implying frequency and leveraged resources in operations, seemed to be better able to collaborate for successful outcomes.

Research limitations/implications

The research is limited to supplier‐customer dyads, and the suppliers' perceptions. The findings are confined to the specific context of the Finnish‐Russian cross‐border trade.

Practical implications

Despite the generally bleak picture of cross‐border supply chain collaboration, interesting insight was generated concerning which areas of collaboration may be the most effective. Supply chain design is one of the areas where companies should clearly collaborate; joint‐planning should therefore include facility location, mode of transport, carrier selection, and general flow management related decisions.

Originality/value

Although the relationship of supply chain collaboration and performance has been established in the literature, the paper contributes to knowledge by exploring the cross‐border context, with international business environment and high level of supply chain uncertainty.

Details

Baltic Journal of Management, vol. 3 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-5265

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Article
Publication date: 25 October 2011

Cathy H.Y. Lam, K.L. Choy and S.H. Chung

The purpose of this paper is to provide a decision support system (DSS) to enhance the performance of cross‐border supply chain, the goal of which is to improve order…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to provide a decision support system (DSS) to enhance the performance of cross‐border supply chain, the goal of which is to improve order planning and fulfill customer orders within the warehouse.

Design/methodology/approach

An intelligent DSS, namely order picking planning system (OPPS) with the adoption of case‐based reasoning, is proposed to support managers in making appropriate order fulfilling decisions when an order involves cross‐border activities. Similar cases in the past are retrieved and adapted in reference to the new order. A case study is then conducted to illustrate the feasibility and effectiveness of the system.

Findings

Recommendations are given to replace the objective decision‐making process in cross‐border supply chain with the help of the DSS. The warehouse order planning time has been reduced and useful information from past order records can be applied to solve new problems.

Originality/value

With the increasing demand for material sourcing across different places, cross‐border supply chain has raised the concern for manufacturers to seek lower material and rental costs. The focus on warehouse operations can increase efficiency in order delivery by considering cross‐border requirements.

Details

Journal of Manufacturing Technology Management, vol. 22 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-038X

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Article
Publication date: 13 November 2007

Diana L. Haytko, John L. Kent and Angela Hausman

This study aims to report on the current issues facing the maquiladora industry in Mexico and the cross‐border supply chain and to present suggestions for improving the…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to report on the current issues facing the maquiladora industry in Mexico and the cross‐border supply chain and to present suggestions for improving the situation in the future.

Design/methodology/approach

Phenomenological interviews were conducted with managers overseeing various aspects of the cross‐border supply chain. The resulting data were analyzed using a grounded theory methodology to uncover theoretical linkages.

Findings

The results of this study show that maquiladoras experience many of the same problems as other companies in terms of managing the cross‐border supply chain. Key factors such as distance, comparative advantage, and integration of the workforce cause problems everyday for the managers involved.

Research limitations/implications

This was an exploratory investigation of the issues with a small number of informants and future research needs to be done to gain additional insights. As North American Free Trade Agreement enters its second decade, and the focus on global supply chain efficiency becomes primary for all manufacturers, solving the problems discussed in this paper becomes even more paramount.

Practical implications

In addition to low‐cost manufacturing, distance and integration are critical issues for companies to understand in their pursuit of a low‐cost strategy for competitive advantage.

Originality/value

The major contribution of this paper has been an improved understanding of the impediments to success in the Mexican maquiladoras. Many of the issues discussed in this paper would also apply to other global supply chains and numerous other countries.

Details

The International Journal of Logistics Management, vol. 18 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-4093

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Article
Publication date: 9 October 2009

Ari‐Pekka Hameri and Juha Hintsa

This paper aims to systematically document drivers of change and the implications they will have on international supply chain management in the coming two decades.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to systematically document drivers of change and the implications they will have on international supply chain management in the coming two decades.

Design/methodology/approach

This study was commissioned by the World Customs Organization (WCO) at the end of June 2006. Because of increased trade volumes, emerging complex supply networks and heightened security concerns, the WCO saw the need to assess future trends and drivers in supply chain management. The Delphi method was applied to identify a set of foreseeable drivers of change and to assess their predicted impact on global supply chain management in the coming ten to 20 years. Based on a literature review of 150 recent publications and interviews among 33 industry, academic and customs experts, a survey was designed and conducted to collect current and potential change drivers in global supply chains. These drivers were compiled and prioritized by an eclectic team of 12 specialists.

Findings

The main results of the study are strongly connected to strategic and operational supply chain planning for the next ten to 20 years. They are related to increased off‐shoring of operations through truly global manufacturing, characterized by its intercontinental supply of materials; increased product complexity with shorter product life cycles; increased importance of business‐to‐government networking for operational and security efficiency; introduction of new supply chain services integrating financial, physical and information flows leading to further consolidation in the logistics markets; and the overall increase in risks and vulnerabilities in international supply chains.

Originality/value

This paper provides a 360 degree view of the future of international supply chain management and the challenges companies will face to compete in the twenty‐first century business environment.

Details

International Journal of Physical Distribution & Logistics Management, vol. 39 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0960-0035

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Article
Publication date: 12 January 2021

Yubing Yu, Baofeng Huo and Zuopeng (Justin) Zhang

Based on the resource-based view and organizational capability theory, we examine the effect of information technology (IT) on company performance through supply chain

Abstract

Purpose

Based on the resource-based view and organizational capability theory, we examine the effect of information technology (IT) on company performance through supply chain integration (SCI) from the upstream and downstream perspective of the whole supply chain.

Design/methodology/approach

Based on data collected from 296 cross-border e-commerce (CBE) companies in China, we used structural equation modeling with LISREL to test the conceptual model.

Findings

The results show that supplier and customer IT significantly promote supplier and customer system and process integration. Supplier system and process integration enhance operational performance. Meanwhile, IT indirectly affects financial performance through operational performance. Customer system integration has positive effects on operational and financial performance, with an indirect effect on financial performance through operational performance. However, customer process integration only improves financial performance.

Research limitations/implications

We only use cross-sectional data from Zhejiang province of China to investigate relationships of related constructs. Future studies can also use longitudinal data in combination with secondary data from other provinces, regions and countries.

Practical implications

The results provide important managerial insights for CBE companies to sustain their competitive advantages by improving their performances through IT and SCI practices throughout the upstream and downstream data-driven supply chain.

Originality/value

This study contributes to the IT and SCI literature by exploring the effectiveness of IT in improving SCI and company performance from the upstream and downstream perspective and the perspective of IT.

Details

Journal of Enterprise Information Management, vol. 34 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-0398

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 2004

Danny Pimentel Claro and Priscila Borin de Oliveira Claro

The recent interest in and increasing demand for healthy, social and environmentally sustainable products, particularly in developed countries, have fostered the presence…

Abstract

The recent interest in and increasing demand for healthy, social and environmentally sustainable products, particularly in developed countries, have fostered the presence of organic coffee supermarket shelves of such countries. Proposes two models of B2B relationships for the Brazilian supply of organic coffee to international markets, more specifically, The Netherlands. For this proposition, compares two possible organizations of the supply chain wherein B2B relationships are based not only on contracts but more importantly on the informal safeguards of mutual trust, long‐term orientation and joint actions. For the two proposed chains, a cross‐border integrator is included to support the coordination of the business relationship. Emphasis is placed on coordination to increase overall efficiency of the supply chain through reduction of internal and transaction costs.

Details

Journal of Business & Industrial Marketing, vol. 19 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0885-8624

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Article
Publication date: 7 January 2014

Luca Urciuoli, Sangeeta Mohanty, Juha Hintsa and Else Gerine Boekesteijn

The purpose of this paper is to enhance the understanding about how energy supply chains work to build resilience against exogenous security threats and thereafter what…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to enhance the understanding about how energy supply chains work to build resilience against exogenous security threats and thereafter what support mechanisms should be introduced or improved by the European Union.

Design/methodology/approach

Five case studies and data collection from multiple sources is used to understand what exogenous security threats could lead to the disruption of oil and gas flows to Europe, how energy companies, from a supply chain perspective, are working to manage these threats and finally, how the EU may coordinate the security of the energy sector in collaboration with supply chain companies.

Findings

Results show that today, oil and gas supply chains have in place a good combination of disruption strategies, including portfolio diversification, flexible contracts, transport capacity planning and safety stocks. The most relevant security threats the companies fear, include hijacking of vessels (sea piracy), but also terrorism, and wars. Finally, the study highlights that the European Union has built a comprehensive portfolio of strategies to deal with scarcity of oil and gas resources. However, these approaches are not often synchronized with supply chain strategies.

Practical implications

The paper provides guidance for supply chain managers dealing with critical suppliers located in conflict environments. The paper recommends that supply chain managers fine tune their strategies in coordination with governmental actions in foreign politics, dependence reduction and crisis management. This may be achieved by closer communication with governments and potentially through the creation of a pan-European sector alliance.

Originality/value

Previous research discusses the topic of supply chain resilience and supply chain risk management. However, none of these studies report on exogenous security threats and disruption strategies of oil and gas supply chains. At the same time, previous research lacks detailed studies describing the interaction between governments and energy supply chains.

Details

Supply Chain Management: An International Journal, vol. 19 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-8546

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Article
Publication date: 12 September 2008

Ruey‐Jer “Bryan” Jean, Rudolf R. Sinkovics and Daekwan Kim

Advanced information technology (IT) changes the way companies manage cross‐border supply chains. This paper examines the role of IT in the context of international…

Abstract

Purpose

Advanced information technology (IT) changes the way companies manage cross‐border supply chains. This paper examines the role of IT in the context of international business to business (B2B) relationship and its contribution to supply chain performance.

Design/methodology/approach

This literature review paper develops a conceptual model of IT‐mediated relationships in international supply chain relationships. The framework integrates transaction cost economics and resource‐based theory perspectives and argues that IT capabilities facilitate supply chain performance, deter partner's opportunism and this process is mediated by B2B processes. Moreover, environmental, relational, cultural and country level moderators are examined.

Findings

It is suggested that IT capabilities contribute directly to improved organizational process such as coordination, transaction specific investment, absorptive capacity and monitoring. These in turn contribute to strategic and operational performance outcomes. Against a resource‐based as well as a transaction‐cost theory background it is suggested that partner interdependence and environmental, country and cultural factors moderate the process of IT contribution on performance.

Research limitations/implications

The paper provides a number of propositions which can be tested empirically in future studies.

Practical implications

Managers should focus on the complementarities of IT capabilities. Electronic integration in combination with, for example, human IT resources may enhance supply chain performance and mitigate the moderating effects of environmental, relational, cultural and country factors.

Originality/value

The paper develops an integrated conceptual model and propositions which contribute to a clarification of the ambiguous nature of the IT‐business value in international B2B relationship.

Details

International Marketing Review, vol. 25 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-1335

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Article
Publication date: 17 September 2019

Andrew Grainger and Cristiano Morini

The purpose of this paper is to disentangle the interactions between logistics operators and government stakeholders in cross-border logistics operations with a specific…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to disentangle the interactions between logistics operators and government stakeholders in cross-border logistics operations with a specific focus on the UK and Brazil.

Design/methodology/approach

The research builds on supporting literature. The comparative cases of the UK and Brazil are examined by reference to an extensive series of focus group workshops as well as a series of interviews with key informants. Care was taken to make sure that comprehensive engagement the respective business and government communities were in place, and that there were opportunities to feedback on the analysis.

Findings

Suggestions were provided on how to improve the business–government interactions in cross-borders logistics operations. The analysis considered transaction costs and scope for trade facilitation. The research also helped produce a descriptive model of business–government interactions in cross-border logistics operations.

Research limitations/implications

The paper points to new directions in the understanding of how businesses interact with government agencies, and the kind of issues they face in cross-border logistics operations. However, the research only looked at two countries and there is significant scope for further enquiry within the logistics literature.

Practical implications

Reduced transaction costs at the border and subsequent economic opportunities for the UK and Brazil.

Social implications

A list of practical reform recommendations informed by the business communities of the UK and Brazil.

Originality/value

This paper’s original contribution to the literature is its framework for the analysis of transaction costs associated with the business–government interactions in cross-border logistics operations. In addition to the resulting findings in Brazil and the UK it may serve as a template for research elsewhere.

Details

The International Journal of Logistics Management, vol. 30 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-4093

Keywords

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Abstract

Details

The Emerald Handbook of Blockchain for Business
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83982-198-1

Keywords

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