Search results

1 – 10 of 46
Article
Publication date: 9 April 2020

Vikas Swarnakar, Anil Kr Tiwari and A.R. Singh

The purpose of this study is to identify, evaluate and develop a structured model to measure the interrelation between critical failure factors (CFFs) that affects the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to identify, evaluate and develop a structured model to measure the interrelation between critical failure factors (CFFs) that affects the implementation of the sustainable Lean Six Sigma (SLSS) framework in a manufacturing organization. Further solution approaches have been provided that inhibit those CFFs and help in successful implementation of the framework.

Design/methodology/approach

To find the interrelation among the selected CFFs and develop a systematic structured model, a total interpretive structural modeling (TISM) approach has been used. A 13-level model for selected CFFs has been formed after the application of the TISM approach. Further classification of CFFs has been performed for a better understanding of their nature through MICMAC analysis.

Findings

A total of 26 SLSS CFFs have been identified through a detailed study of case organization, various literature reviews and experience of panel experts toward developing a systematic model of CFFs. The solution approach has been provided by panel experts based on their industrial experiences after observing the role of CFFs in the developed model. Based on the analysis, it was found that most dependent and dominant CFFs affect the implementation of the SLSS framework in the case organization.

Practical implications

This study helps SLSS practitioners, project managers, decision-makers and academicians of manufacturing industries to a better understanding of the failure factors and their interrelations while implementing the SLSS framework in manufacturing organizations. This study also guides the systematic solution approach which helps in tackling such problems that occurred in manufacturing organizations.

Originality/value

In this study, the TISM-based structural model of CFFs for implementing the SLSS framework in manufacturing organizations has been proposed which is a very new effort in the area of a manufacturing environment.

Article
Publication date: 29 November 2018

Raja Sreedharan V., Gopikumar V., Smitha Nair, Ayon Chakraborty and Jiju Antony

Many projects focus on the reliable operation of the activities in the project. Any failure in the process activities leads to major problems resulting in waste, defects…

Abstract

Purpose

Many projects focus on the reliable operation of the activities in the project. Any failure in the process activities leads to major problems resulting in waste, defects, equipment damage, which has a direct impact on the consumers. In addition, Lean Six Sigma (LSS) is not new to this issue. LSS projects have faced an interruption in the process flow and unforeseen defects. Therefore, the purpose of this paper is to identify the vital failure factors of LSS projects.

Design/methodology/approach

Through extant literature review, the researchers found 44 critical failure factors (CFFs) of LSS. Using the Technique for Order Preference by Similarity to Ideal Solution (TOPSIS) SIMOS approach, the decision makers’ (DMs) rating and weight for each factor were collected. Moreover, the study was conducted in both the manufacturing and service industries to identify the impact of CFFs in LSS projects.

Findings

CFFs and their evaluation have received little attention in the literature. Most of the previous studies deal only with the identification of the success factors in general. Therefore, the study identified 44 CFFs and ranked them through DMs. In addition, the TOPSIS SIMOS approach ranked the vital failure factors enabling the management to avert the LSS project from failures.

Research limitations/implications

The study focused on project failures due to CFFs of LSS. Nevertheless, it did not consider other failure factors of project and knowledge management. Further, the sample used to test the approach was considerably small. Therefore, the study can be repeated with significant samples and the vital failure factors compared.

Practical implications

In real-life application, all the parameters in the LSS project need to be understood in a better manner. In such a condition, the practitioner needs to know that the project never fails due to the CFFs and TOPSIS SIMOS approach can prevent the LSS project failures.

Originality/value

The study applied TOPSIS SIMOS approach to rank the CFFs in an LSS project, which is first of its kind and aids the practitioners to make the right decisions in the business environment.

Details

Benchmarking: An International Journal, vol. 25 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-5771

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 9 October 2020

Vikas Swarnakar, A.R. Singh and Anil Kr Tiwari

The purpose of this study is to develop a structured hierarchical interrelationship-based model to evaluate the critical failure factors (CFFs) that affect the sustainable…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to develop a structured hierarchical interrelationship-based model to evaluate the critical failure factors (CFFs) that affect the sustainable Lean Six Sigma (SLSS) framework implementation in a healthcare organization. Further, solution approaches have been provided that guide to eliminate them.

Design/methodology/approach

The CFFs has been identified through empirical study and clustered into six major categories for their better understanding. The interrelation among CFFs has been developed through total interpretive structural modeling (TISM) and classifies the nature using MICMAC technique. Further, prioritized the CFFs based on its driving and dependents power. The methodology enabled the decision-makers, practitioners to systematically analyze the CFFs and develop a structural model for implementing SLSS in the healthcare environment.

Findings

A total of 14 leading CFFs have been identified, and 7-level structured interrelationship-based model has been formed. The experts have provided the solution approach after careful analysis of the developed model. Based on the analysis, it was observed that the significant CFFs affect the deployment of the SLSS framework in healthcare organizations.

Research limitations/implications

The structured model and methodological approach have been tested in a healthcare organization. In the future, the approach can be applied in the different service sectors.

Practical implications

The present study has been conducted in a real-time industrial problem. The practitioners, decision-makers and academicians expressed the usefulness of methodology for understanding the CFFs interrelation and their effect on SLSS implementation. This study also guides decision-makers to systematically tackle related problems.

Originality/value

The development of a structured CFFs based model for SLSS framework implementation using the integrated TISM-MICMAC with a detailed solution approach is a unique effort in a healthcare environment.

Details

International Journal of Quality & Reliability Management, vol. 38 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-671X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 10 January 2020

Eunice Cristyl del Pilar, Irish Alegado and Miriam Fabroa Bongo

The premature closure of microbusinesses has become a prevalent issue that demands to be seriously addressed due to the major economic contribution it provides…

Abstract

Purpose

The premature closure of microbusinesses has become a prevalent issue that demands to be seriously addressed due to the major economic contribution it provides particularly to developing countries. The purpose of this paper is to establish and further analyze a set of critical failure factors (CFFs) that aid in the systematic decision-making and strategic management of stakeholders.

Design/methodology/approach

A comprehensive literature review is conducted to gather CFFs and an interpretative structural modeling with Matriced’ Impacts Croise’s Multiplication Appliquée a UN Classement (ISM-MICMAC) analysis is applied to investigate the structural relationships among CFFs by extracting its inherent characteristics according to its driving power and dependence power. In order to illustrate the methodology, a case study is conducted in Cebu, the Philippines.

Findings

It is interesting to note that inadequate government programs information is deemed the most crucial for stakeholders to tackle as its impact on the premature closure of microbusinesses is highly significant. Drawing from this key result, directions for potential strategies for getting evidence-based research into policy and practice in the micro-business sector in the Philippines, and other developing countries, are provided.

Originality/value

Lastly, the contribution of this work is two-fold and is aimed at policymakers and managers. For one, this study is the first to establish a set of CFFs specifically aimed at the level of microbusinesses, a seriously under-researched business sector, which can aid and influence domestic policymakers. For another, a framework that will facilitate business managers in carrying out organization’s strategy development process have been provided.

Details

Journal of Small Business and Enterprise Development, vol. 27 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1462-6004

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 15 July 2014

Surangkana Trangkanont and Chotchai Charoenngam

Numerous studies to date have demonstrated the public-private partnership (PPP) project procurement method's failure to deliver low-cost housing (LCH) to low-income groups…

1513

Abstract

Purpose

Numerous studies to date have demonstrated the public-private partnership (PPP) project procurement method's failure to deliver low-cost housing (LCH) to low-income groups (LIGs) in developing countries. The purpose of this paper is to investigate critical failure factors (CFFs), and how they cause the failure of PPP-LCH program.

Design/methodology/approach

Grounded Theory methodology was used to gather and analyze the data in order to identify, categorize, and develop the logically causal relationships among CFFs that cause PPP-LCH program failure.

Findings

Ten CFFs in various phases of PPP-LCH project life cycle caused PPP-LCH program failure. Some CFFs resulted from ineffective PPP policy and strategy, while some were beyond the control of the project/program management team. These CFFs were inter-/intra-related to one another in a particular way.

Originality/value

Despite the increase in PPP-LCH projects/programs for LIGs in practice and the prevalence of failure, the studies of PPP-LCH project/program failure still suffer from insufficient conceptual clarity about the causes of these failures. The lessons learned, to some extent, help decision makers in both public and private sectors to reduce the probability of the PPP-LCH project/program failure by clearly explaining the nature of each CFF.

Details

Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management, vol. 21 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-9988

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 7 June 2022

Shreeranga Bhat, Jiju Antony, Gijo E.V., Rajesh Koul, Elizabeth A. Cudney and Ayon Chakraborty

While Six Sigma (SS) has been deployed effectively in Indian manufacturing and service sectors as a process improvement methodology, the implementation of Design for Six…

Abstract

Purpose

While Six Sigma (SS) has been deployed effectively in Indian manufacturing and service sectors as a process improvement methodology, the implementation of Design for Six Sigma (DFSS) for robust product and service development has not shown noticeable results. Therefore, this article aims to determine the critical failure factors (CFFs) of DFSS in the Indian context.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper presents the results of a pilot survey on the CFFs of DFSS in Indian companies. The survey participants were specialists in DFSS who have been involved in DFSS projects in their past and present companies. Moreover, the pilot study participants were DFSS Champions, Master Black Belts, Black Belts and Green Belts from the manufacturing and service sectors.

Findings

Company-wide applications of DFSS are very limited in India. Most of the DFSS project failures are reported in the Analyse phase of the project. The results indicated that all 18 CFFs used in the survey have a significant impact on project failures. Also, it was determined that all CFFs are positively correlated with each other. Further, a strong correlation was observed between the voice of the customer (VOC) and project selection and prioritisation. In addition, effective training showed a strong correlation with the right selection of tools.

Research limitations/implications

The pilot survey was based on a limited sample size. Moreover, the study is confined to only the Indian context and data were collected through the authors' networks. However, respondents were proficient, certified and involved in DFSS project deployment in the manufacturing and service sectors. Therefore, the study's findings are useful and meaningful to draw robust inferences.

Originality/value

To the best of the authors' knowledge, this is the first empirical study conducted in the Indian context to identify the reasons for DFSS project failures. The study's findings can aid academicians and practitioners in comprehending and critically examining the CFFs of DFSS before executing a project. Moreover, the research outcome motivates policymakers to create an ecosystem to effectively adopt DFSS for start-ups and micro, small and medium enterprises (MSME) to ensure a circular economy and support the “Atmanirbhar Bharat” initiative.

Details

The TQM Journal, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1754-2731

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 4 February 2014

Peyman Akhavan and Amir Pezeshkan

The goal of this paper is to present the main critical failure factors extracted from analyzing ten case studies of failure in knowledge management (KM) systems and

3465

Abstract

Purpose

The goal of this paper is to present the main critical failure factors extracted from analyzing ten case studies of failure in knowledge management (KM) systems and projects and present a framework in which the failure factors are linked to the different stages in the cycle of KM implementation.

Design/methodology/approach

“Grounded theory” as a qualitative research technique has been applied to explore the main failure factors. Data was collected reviewing scholarly articles containing KM case studies (failure in KM implementation) and after an in-depth study – applying grounded theory method – the results of main critical failure factors categorized and analyzed in specific stages of implementing KM systems.

Findings

Through review and analysis of ten case studies, two main results were obtained. First, the main critical failure factors of KM projects were identified. Second, identified critical failure factors were traced along the KM implementation cycle. A framework is proposed that shows the critical failure factors' effect in each specific stage of the KM cycle.

Research limitations/implications

The results of this research are generalized based on cases from prior literature. However, the authors have tried to be as inclusive as possible to ensure a representative sample of reported KM failures. In addition, organizations do not provide accurate reports of failure in their projects because of their policies, the image of their organization, and privacy, which could affect the identification of all failure factors.

Practical implications

The findings are incorporated into a framework of failure factors in KM projects and the proposed framework can help practitioners in organizations to avoid factors that lead to the demise of KM systems in each stage of the KM project development cycle. This multi-case study research and its suggested framework are also useful for academics to gain a comprehensive view of KM critical failure factors for future studies.

Originality/value

To the authors' knowledge this study is the first of its kind to provide an integrated perspective of critical failure factors for the implementation of KM through the inspection of ten case studies and maps the failure factors on KM implementation cycle. It provides valuable information and guidelines that will hopefully pave the way for managers to avoid failure in implementation of a KM.

Article
Publication date: 24 September 2020

John Israilidis, Evangelia Siachou and Stephen Kelly

This paper explores critical failure factors (CFFs) in the context of knowledge sharing. It provides further insights into what can cause knowledge- sharing failures

Abstract

Purpose

This paper explores critical failure factors (CFFs) in the context of knowledge sharing. It provides further insights into what can cause knowledge- sharing failures, inflexible knowledge-sharing strategies and ineffective knowledge- sharing mechanisms. It also examines how practitioners can reduce or even mitigate such dysfunctions.

Design/methodology/approach

A case-based inductive approach was conducted. Data were collected from two studies applying mixed methods. The first data set included nine in-depth, semi-structured interviews with highly skilled personnel from an aerospace and defense organization. The second data source included 375 successfully completed questionnaires from participants employed at the same organization.

Findings

The paper identifies six CFFs with an impact on knowledge sharing. It also reveals that managing organizational ignorance can play a key role in generating new knowledge and averting failure. Study findings provide insights into the importance of identifying these failures when sharing knowledge and propose relevant mitigation strategies.

Originality/value

This paper identifies a range of empirically validated CFFs that complement the extant work on the complexity of knowledge sharing and have hitherto not been seen in the literature. It also provides a more nuanced understanding of why both organizations and their people often fail to share knowledge by exploring the role of organizational ignorance.

Details

Information Technology & People, vol. 34 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-3845

Keywords

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 10 March 2022

Olivia McDermott, Jiju Antony, Michael Sony and Tom Healy

The main objective of this study is to investigate what are the critical success factors that exist for continuous improvement (CI) methodology deployment in the Irish…

Abstract

Purpose

The main objective of this study is to investigate what are the critical success factors that exist for continuous improvement (CI) methodology deployment in the Irish medical technology (MedTech) industry. The research will, in particular, seek to establish if the highly regulated nature of the global MedTech industry is an additional critical failure factor (CFF) for the deployment of CI methodology. The study involves the analysis of the benefits, challenges, CFFs and tools most utilised for the application to the deployment of CI methodologies in the Irish medical device (MD) industry.

Design/methodology/approach

A quantitative survey was utilised in this study. The main participants were made up of senior quality professionals working in operational excellence, quality consultants, quality directors, quality engineers, quality managers and quality supervisors working in both manufacturing and service sectors from Irish MD companies. A total of 94 participants from the Irish MedTech industry responded to the survey.

Findings

The main finding of this study is that 42% of participants perceived that a highly regulated environment was a CFF to CI, whilst 79% of respondents utilised Lean Six Sigma in their organisations, and productivity and financial factors were found to be the highest reasons for CI deployment amongst the Irish MedTech industry. The top CFFs highlighted for CI in regulated industries were fear of extra validation activity, compliance versus quality culture and a regulatory culture of being “safe”. Another relevant finding presented in this paper is that just over 48% of participants felt that CI tools are very strongly integrated into the industries quality management systems (QMSs) such as the corrective and preventative action system, non-conformance and audit systems.

Research limitations/implications

All data collected in the survey came from professionals working for Irish indigenous and multinational MedTech companies. It is important to highlight that n = 94 is a low sample size, which is enough for a preliminary survey but reinforcing the limitation in terms of generalisation of the results. A further study on a wider European and global scale as well as a comparison with the highly regulated pharma industry would be informative.

Originality/value

The authors understand that this is the very first research focussed on the CFFs for CI in the MedTech/MD manufacturing industry with a specific focus on the highly regulated nature of the industry as a potential CFF. The results of this study represent an important first step towards a full understanding of the applicability and use of CI in the medical-device-manufacturing industries on a global scale.

Details

The TQM Journal, vol. 34 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1754-2731

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 18 October 2021

Jiju Antony, James Lancastle, Olivia McDermott, Shreeranga Bhat, Ratri Parida and Elizabeth A. Cudney

The purpose of this paper is to conduct an empirical study derived from the previous literature from the perspective of benefits, tools and techniques, continuous…

254

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to conduct an empirical study derived from the previous literature from the perspective of benefits, tools and techniques, continuous improvement (CI) and quality improvement (QI) methodologies and critical failure factors (CFFs) of Lean and Six Sigma (SS) in the national health service (NHS).

Design/methodology/approach

A literature review was carried out to identify previous findings, empirical data and critical variables concerning Lean and SS in healthcare for over ten years. Second, primary research in quantitative surveys and qualitative interviews was carried out with 110 participants who have experience using Lean and SS in the NHS.

Findings

Lean and SS have evolved into common practices within the NHS and now have an established list of tools and techniques frequently employed by staff. Lean and SS are considered robust CI methodologies capable of effectively delivering extensive benefits across many different categories. The NHS must overcome a sizable amount of highly important CFFs and divided organizational culture.

Originality/value

This paper has developed the most extensive empirical study ever produced on Lean and SS in the NHS and has expanded on previous works to create new and updated research. The findings produced in this paper will assist NHS medical directors and practitioners in obtaining up-to-date insight into Lean and SS status in the NHS. The paper will also guide the NHS to critically evaluate their current CI strategy to ensure long-term sustainability and deliver improved levels of service to patients.

Details

International Journal of Quality & Reliability Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-671X

Keywords

1 – 10 of 46