Search results

1 – 10 of over 44000
To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part

Wendy Cukier, Suzanne Gagnon, Laura Mae Lindo, Charity Hannan and Sarah Amato

To explore how Critical Management Studies can be used to frame a strategy to effect change and promote diversity and inclusion in organizations.

Abstract

Purpose

To explore how Critical Management Studies can be used to frame a strategy to effect change and promote diversity and inclusion in organizations.

Design/methodology/approach

Drawing on the experience gained from a large multi-sector action research project aimed at promoting equality, diversity and inclusion in organizations, this chapter proposes a multilayer [Critical] Ecological Model.

Findings

While early critical theorists were committed to effecting change, the rise of post-modern critical theory eroded the ground on which to stand, widening the gap between theory and practice. Secondly, the chapter asserts the importance of linking empirical research and critical theory in order to advance equality seeking projects. Thirdly, the chapter provides a [Critical] Ecological model that bridges theory and action in Critical Management Studies, based partly on experience from a large community-based research project. The need for a multifaceted approach to advance equality and inclusion emerged as a way to bridge ideological differences among actors and academics committed to effecting social change.

Practical implications

By addressing directly the challenges of theoretical rifts as well as differences in research focused on micro, meso and macro levels, the chapter builds a framework to allow different stakeholders – scholars, practitioners, activists and change agents across sectors – to take action in advancing inclusion and equality as well as an understanding of interactions between levels.

Originality/value

While sharing similar goals, many approaches to change are fragmented on the level of analysis and by underlying paradigms. This chapter is unique in its focus on ways to bridge theory and practice and to develop a framework for action that accommodates equality seeking theorists and activists working on several levels.

Details

Getting Things Done
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78190-954-6

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

Robin Selzer and Todd Foley

The purpose of this paper is to implement diversity and inclusion practices in an USA university department through the application of a cultural audit in the style of…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to implement diversity and inclusion practices in an USA university department through the application of a cultural audit in the style of participatory action research (PAR). The cultural audit process demonstrates an inclusive, grassroots approach to creating actionable solutions that brings about positive organizational change and can be replicated by others.

Design/methodology/approach

The version of an organizational cultural audit described here included two phases. The first was quantitative in nature, using a survey to collect data that would provide the organization with a perspective of how its culture is perceived (Fletcher and Jones, 1992) and serve as the basis for the second, more crucial phase. The second phase utilized PAR qualitative approach. Having data presented in aggregate form allows for truer reactions to how others believe they experience the work environment, as opposed to making assumptions about how others may experience the work environment. A cultural audit such as this relies heavily upon the qualitative narrative that is exposed when participants react to the quantitative data presented. In fact, the real assessment begins not with the quantitative data collection process, but with the presentation of the quantitative data and the analysis of how participants respond to what they see.

Findings

The researchers found social and practical implications for empowering employees to develop a culturally agile organization. Results showed that participants generally viewed the culture as lacking transparency and needing values-based guidelines for everyday interactions. Participants thought they should value diversity, but viewed the culture as having a gap in solutions to apply that value. Incentivizing actions that promote diversity and inclusion and better shared governance were needed to address cultural problems in the organization. Recommendations for actionable solutions included: developing shared language through a values statement, restructuring onboarding and mentoring support, increasing transparency of standing committee work, membership, and minutes to foster trust and communication, implementing group guidelines for respectful interactions, and the creation of regular, planned social events to enhance human relations. This case study is significant because it uses an innovative method to not only study diversity and inclusion in a university setting, but also take action, thereby filling a gap in the literature on critical studies of organizations.

Research limitations/implications

For those trying to institute a similar experience for their organization, it would be important to note that the cultural audit was a grassroots intervention, designed to help the division discern what kinds of lived experiences and shared assumptions exist within.

Practical implications

The case study presented should serve as a roadmap for how individuals can garner support for conducting a similar cultural audit with their own organizations.

Originality/value

This case study is significant because it uses an innovative method to not only study diversity in a university setting, but also take action, thereby filling a gap in the literature on critical studies of organizations.

Details

Qualitative Research in Organizations and Management: An International Journal, vol. 13 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-5648

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

George Gotsis and Zoe Kortezi

The purpose of this paper is to contribute to the elaboration of a comprehensive moral framework for designing and implementing diversity practices. In so doing, it…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to contribute to the elaboration of a comprehensive moral framework for designing and implementing diversity practices. In so doing, it employs distinct ethical theories that not only elevate respect for differences to an end, but also provide a set of principles, virtues or values conducive to the formation of an inclusive work environment.

Design/methodology/approach

A literature review, in particular contributions critical to current implementations of diversity management, may provide the basis of a non-instrumental approach to diversity issues, allowing for an inclusive and participative workplace. The paper suggests that such an endeavor can be founded on the concepts of organizational virtue, care or human dignity alternatively. In this respect, a theoretical context demonstrating the very way these concepts influence and inform diversity issues, is elaborated, analyzed and properly discussed.

Findings

Three distinct theoretical frameworks capturing the importance of major ethical traditions based on dignity, organizational virtue and care, for reconceptualizing diversity issues, are introduced. It is proposed that non-utilitarian philosophical ethics (and more specifically, Kantian deontology, Aristotelian virtue ethics or ethics of care) is in a position to provide a rationale for diversity policies that affirm the diverse other as a valued end.

Practical implications

The authors argue that a corporation is in a position to develop ethically-informed diversity initiatives that may effectively combine performance with an affirmation of the value of the diverse other.

Social implications

The authors argue that a corporation is in a position to develop ethically-informed diversity initiatives that may effectively combine performance with an affirmation of the value of the diverse other.

Originality value

The paper offers certain insights into the particular conditions that may help organizations design and implement a diversity strategy facilitating thriving and fulfillment of diverse others, grounded on the priority of dignity, virtue or care respectively. Such a perspective, permeating vision, culture and leadership, is invested with a potential that overcomes the managerial instrumentality, so strongly denounced by the majority of critical diversity scholars.

Details

Journal of Organizational Change Management, vol. 26 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0953-4814

Keywords

Abstract

Details

Qualitative Research in Organizations and Management: An International Journal, vol. 13 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-5648

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

Abdullah Promise Opute

This conceptual paper aims to offer a theoretical contribution that explicates the “blind spot” cultural diversity and reward diversity team conflict contingencies, and…

Abstract

Purpose

This conceptual paper aims to offer a theoretical contribution that explicates the “blind spot” cultural diversity and reward diversity team conflict contingencies, and personal audit as a mechanism for managing the consequences.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper suggests a framework for analysing and managing diversity (cultural and reward) driven team conflicts. Given the theoretical foundation, personal audit among team members is recommended as a tool for managing the consequences of such conflict factors.

Findings

This paper underlines the team building intervention utility for team effectiveness. It reinforces theoretical foundation that highlights conflict as a determinant of team effectiveness, and reviews two diversity dimensions of team conflicts. Finally, it suggests and explains an “active learning” personal audit model for achieving the conceptualised team effectiveness perspective.

Practical implications

The paper highlights critical but usually overlooked team conflict intricacies in football team management. This framework offers practical relevance in enabling understanding of “attitudes and behaviours” of team members and human resource management in football marketing. Managers would benefit from this perspective and improve team effectiveness, performance and organisation's performance.

Originality/value

The paper offers valuable conceptual insight for development, one that serves the interest of management of football clubs and academia.

Details

Team Performance Management: An International Journal, vol. 18 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-7592

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

Claudia Arena, Alessandro Cirillo, Donata Mussolino, Ingrid Pulcinelli, Sara Saggese and Fabrizia Sarto

This paper aims to provide insights on the gender-performance relationship, this paper studies the impact of board gender diversity on firm performance, by taking into…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to provide insights on the gender-performance relationship, this paper studies the impact of board gender diversity on firm performance, by taking into account the “critical mass” of women directors and their educational level.

Design/methodology/approach

The hypotheses are tested on a unique dataset of 211 European Union publicly listed companies in 2012 belonging to the construction industry from 28 different countries through a set of ordinary least squares regressions.

Findings

The evidence shows that the “critical mass” rather than the simple presence of women has an incremental benefit on firm performance. In addition, results show that the educational level of women directors negatively affects firm performance, as it might impact the dynamics within the boardroom.

Research limitations/implications

The quantitative nature of the study does not allow drawing strong inferences on behavioral processes and dynamics in and around the boardroom. Nevertheless, this study will open new research insights on exploring the educational level on board.

Practical implications

Regulators and policymakers that should be aware of the influence of women as a group on firm performance and that this role is differential across industries.

Originality/value

The novelty of this paper is that it investigates the role of women in a high masculine gender-specific industry and explores a still poorly understood demographic variable (i.e. the educational level) of women directors.

Details

Corporate Governance, vol. 15 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1472-0701

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

Judith K. Pringle and Irene Ryan

– The purpose of this paper is to operationalize context in diversity management research.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to operationalize context in diversity management research.

Design/methodology/approach

A case analysis provides an example of the influences of context at macro, meso and micro levels. Country context (macro) and professional and organization contexts (meso) are analysed in relation to the micro individual experiences of gender and indigeneity at work.

Findings

Tensions and inconsistencies at macro and meso levels impact on diversity management at a micro level. The authors demonstrate how power and context are intertwined in the biopolitical positioning of subjects in terms of gender and indigeneity. The contested legacy of indigenous-colonial relations and societal gender dynamics are “played out” in a case from the accounting profession.

Research limitations/implications

Within critical diversity studies context and power are linked in a reciprocal relationship; analysis of both is mandatory to strengthen theory and practice. The multi-level analytical framework provides a useful tool to understand advances and lack of progress for diversity groups within specific organizations.

Originality/value

While many diversity scholars agree that the analysis of context is important, hitherto its application has been vague. The authors conduct a multi-level analysis of context, connecting the power dynamics between the levels. The authors draw out implications within one profession in a specific country socio-politics. Multi-level analyses of context and power have the potential to enhance the theory and practice of diversity management.

Details

Equality, Diversity and Inclusion: An International Journal, vol. 34 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-7149

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

Lotte Holck

The purpose of this paper is to critically explore why a diversity agenda in favor of equal opportunities failed despite apparent organizational support and commitment to…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to critically explore why a diversity agenda in favor of equal opportunities failed despite apparent organizational support and commitment to diversity.

Design/methodology/approach

Drawing on data from a municipal center, this study inquire into how organizational dynamics of power and hierarchy influence change efforts to alter practices of inequality. The study is positioned within critical diversity research and structured around an analysis of the researcher’s fieldwork experiences.

Findings

The analysis examines into why change efforts failed despite organizational approval of a diversity agenda, open-mindedness toward change and legitimacy in regard to diversity. Paradoxically, change efforts designed to alter the status quo were, in practice, derailed and circumvented through power dynamics reproducing organizational inequality.

Research limitations/implications

A single case study in a particular type of organization constrains the generalizability but point to new directions for future research.

Practical implications

This study aims at sensitizing researchers and diversity practitioners alike to the organizational embeddedness of diversity initiatives. Accordingly, change efforts must necessarily address diversity in a situated perspective and as intersecting with key organizational power dynamics gaining impetus from macro discourses on diversity and difference.

Originality/value

Few critical diversity scholars engage with practitioners and reflect on the impact of their studies. In doing so, this paper contributes by developing diversity research, exploring the limitations and possibilities for increasing its relevance and impact.

Details

Equality, Diversity and Inclusion: An International Journal, vol. 35 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-7149

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

Wendy Cukier, Suzanne Gagnon and Ruby Latif

This paper examines actors and discourses shaping new Canadian legislation designed to advance diversity in corporate governance.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper examines actors and discourses shaping new Canadian legislation designed to advance diversity in corporate governance.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper performs a stakeholder and discourse analysis drawing on texts of parliamentary debates.

Findings

The paper illuminates tensions regarding definitions of diversity, its importance for boards of directors and the mechanisms favoured for implementation. Official discourses examined show that, unlike for other political issues, opposition was largely muted, and most stakeholders engaged in the process supported legislation advancing diversity. Nonetheless areas of debate and positioning by actors and suggest important differences, with outcomes linked to non-traditional power bases.

Research limitations/implications

This study provides insights into the discursive environments of organizations and processes relating to promoting diversity and equality in the political decision-making domain, a critical venue for understanding advancement of equity, often neglected in organizational studies.

Practical implications

By understanding the complex and competing discourses surrounding diversity and inclusion at the macro level this paper provides a context for understanding organizational (meso) and individual (micro) beliefs and behaviours.

Social implications

This study shows how advocacy shapes how policy and legislation are framed and the ways mainstream organizations, including women's groups, may advance gender equality without regard to other dimensions of diversity or intersectionality.

Originality/value

This study maps the political discourse around recent Canadian legislation designed to improve diversity on boards that must, in the Canadian context, address more than gender.

Details

Equality, Diversity and Inclusion: An International Journal, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-7149

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

Leigh Lafever‐Ayer

The purpose of this paper is to look at how the creation of a tailor‐made Diversity Scorecard helped Enterprise Rent‐A‐Car to equip regional managers to build diversity

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to look at how the creation of a tailor‐made Diversity Scorecard helped Enterprise Rent‐A‐Car to equip regional managers to build diversity into their businesses.

Design/methodology/approach

Designed to empower each branch to serve local customers according to their needs, the Enterprise business model is highly decentralized. Autonomy is drilled down and this includes HR decisions which are made region by region. When diversity became identified as a business priority for Enterprise, a series of initiatives were implemented to raise understanding and awareness at the regional level including workshops and training. However, it was the introduction of the Diversity Scorecard that enabled regional teams to measure their success in this and plan for improvement where required.

Findings

As a result of its strategic focus on diversity, Enterprise recruited 40 percent females and 22 percent Black, Asian and minority ethnic (BAME) this year, exceeding its targets. Of employees in management positions, 24 per cent are from minorities globally. The company has been recognized externally by organizations such as Business in the Community for its efforts. Enterprise has proved that diverse businesses are successful. In 17 years since it opened its first UK branch, the company has grown to more than 360 branches in the UK, with 25 opened in the last year alone.

Originality/value

Enterprise takes a deliberately incremental, evolutionary approach to diversity. Central is the recognition that diversity is more than a policy or a value. It needs to underpin the actions and decisions of each employee – and especially managers – on a day‐to‐day basis. Large businesses with a distributed workforce need to equip regional teams with the tools to ensure that diversity is a part of every decision.

Details

Strategic HR Review, vol. 12 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1475-4398

Keywords

1 – 10 of over 44000