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Article
Publication date: 23 September 2019

Cristina Sancha, Josep F. Mària S.J. and Cristina Gimenez

The purpose of this paper is to illustrate how a focal firm can manage sustainability in its lower-tier suppliers which lie beyond the firm’s visible horizon.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to illustrate how a focal firm can manage sustainability in its lower-tier suppliers which lie beyond the firm’s visible horizon.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper presents a new approach to managing sustainability in multi-tier supply chains with an illustrative case study that analyzes how electronic equipment firms make efforts to verify that they are not using conflict minerals.

Findings

The nexus supplier (smelters in the electronics supply chain) plays a relevant role in increasing visibility and tracing the source of minerals, thus guaranteeing sustainability upstream in the supply chain.

Research limitations/implications

The paper is based on a specific supply chain (i.e. electronics supply chain) and therefore its conclusions might be only partially generalized to other sectors.

Practical implications

Firms in complex supply chains need to make efforts to identify and manage nexus suppliers to extend sustainability upstream in the supply chain, especially beyond their visible horizon.

Originality/value

The paper focuses on management of sustainability in the invisible zone of the supply chain, which has been neglected in previous literature and is increasingly important to the managerial world in an economy with a growing number of global supply chains.

Details

African Journal of Economic and Management Studies, vol. 10 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-0705

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 12 May 2020

Maricela C. Arellano, Cristina Sancha, Torbjørn Netland and Cristina Gimenez Thomsen

In pursuit of increased competitiveness, global manufacturers often seek tighter integration among the plants in their production networks. However, this is a challenging…

Abstract

Purpose

In pursuit of increased competitiveness, global manufacturers often seek tighter integration among the plants in their production networks. However, this is a challenging task because plants are dispersed across multiple institutional environments. Although the literature provides abundant evidence of how formal institutional environments affect the integration among plants, little is known about the role of the informal institutional environment – such as culture. In this study, the authors investigate the relationship between different dimensions of culture and manufacturing network integration.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors combine survey data from the most recent International Manufacturing Strategy Survey with secondary data that capture cultural dimensions. They then analyze the responses from 581 assembly plants in 21 countries obtained from the survey using a multilevel regression model.

Findings

The study results show that plants located in masculine and long-term-oriented national cultures are associated with lower levels of integration with other plants. The results for the other four Hofstede dimensions of national culture were not statistically significant. At the level of organizational culture, the authors found that a collaborative plant environment positively relates to higher levels of network integration. They did not find statistically significant evidence for the relationship between cultural or geographical distance and network integration.

Practical implications

This research provides managers with practical insights into the types and combinations of cultural environments that affect the integration of plants in a global network. This knowledge is useful for informing effective integration strategies and tactics.

Originality

The authors provide new, empirical evidence of the relation between the informal institutional environments of a plant and its integration in a manufacturing network. Drawing on an institution-based view, they contribute to the literature on manufacturing networks by discussing and testing empirically the role of national and organizational culture in network integration.

Details

Journal of Manufacturing Technology Management, vol. 32 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-038X

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2009

Rudolf O. Large, Cristina Giménez and Donna McCarthy

The main purpose of this paper is the evaluation of previous German and Spanish research conducted related to oral communication capability in a different cultural…

Abstract

The main purpose of this paper is the evaluation of previous German and Spanish research conducted related to oral communication capability in a different cultural surrounding. In order to test the validity of the European findings, a new sample was drawn using membership data of the U.S. based National Institute of Governmental Purchasing. The results of this paper corroborate that oral communication capability is a construct consisting of three dimensions. The model obtained in Europe for managers from private sector purchasers is also applicable in the U.S. for public purchasers. Furthermore, European results proposed four distinct types of communicators, while in the U.S. two additional groups of purchasers were found. Nevertheless, there is limited evidence for demographic or cultural influences on the oral communication capabilities of purchasers.

Details

Journal of Public Procurement, vol. 9 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1535-0118

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Article
Publication date: 8 June 2015

Cristina Sancha, Cristina Gimenez, Vicenta Sierra and Ali Kazeminia

The purpose of this paper is twofold. First is to investigate the impact of social supplier development practices on the suppliers’ social performance. Second is to…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is twofold. First is to investigate the impact of social supplier development practices on the suppliers’ social performance. Second is to analyze if the implementation of supplier development practices by Western buying firms pays off in terms of operational and economic results.

Design/methodology/approach

Hypotheses are tested in a sample of 120 Spanish manufacturing firms using Path Analysis.

Findings

The results suggest that while supplier development practices help to improve the suppliers’ social performance and the buying firm’s operational performance, they do not pay off in terms of economic performance.

Research limitations/implications

The paper shows that supplier development practices help to improve the suppliers’ social performance while improving the operational performance of the buying firm. The study has two main limitations. First, because cross-sectional data are used, possible recursive relationships could not be accounted for. Second, the study is limited to the Spanish scope and, as such, results need to be interpreted in that context.

Practical implications

The results of this study provide insights to managers with respect to the implementation of supplier development practices to make their suppliers more socially responsible. Furthermore, managers are shown the implications of implementing such practices in terms of operational and economic outcomes.

Originality/value

This paper contributes to the existing literature on the effectiveness of sustainable supplier development practices by including the suppliers’ performance, which has been generally neglected. Objective measures for economic performance are also included.

Details

Supply Chain Management: An International Journal, vol. 20 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-8546

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2006

Cristina Gimenez

This paper sets out to empirically analyse the integration process that firms follow to implement supply chain management (SCM). This study has been inspired by the…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper sets out to empirically analyse the integration process that firms follow to implement supply chain management (SCM). This study has been inspired by the integration model proposed by Stevens.

Design/methodology/approach

Uses the survey method.

Findings

The results show that there are companies in three different integration stages. In stage I, companies are not integrated. In stage II, companies have a medium‐high level of internal integration in the logistics‐production interface, a low level of internal integration in the logistics‐marketing interface, and a medium level of external integration. And, in stage III, companies have high levels of integration in both internal interfaces and in some of their supply chain relationships.

Research limitations/implications

First, only one side of the manufacturer‐retailer relationship was considered, and, second, there was a reduced number of cases in each cluster.

Practical implications

As firms' survival lies on integration, a good understanding of the integration process is a key aspect. In this subject, this study has a main implication for managers: in the integration process, firms must achieve a relatively high level of collaboration among internal functions before initiating any external integration.

Originality/value

The contribution of this study is to describe the integration process, comparing two levels of internal integration (logistics‐marketing and logistics‐production) and analysing the relationship between these internal integration levels and the level of external integration. Many studies consider internal or external integration from the logistics point of view, but very few consider both levels of integration simultaneously. This study differs from the existing literature in the fact that it explores the sequence of integration stages in an integration process.

Details

International Journal of Physical Distribution & Logistics Management, vol. 36 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0960-0035

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 2 November 2015

Elcio M. Tachizawa, Cristina Gimenez and Vicenta Sierra

– The purpose of this paper is to analyse the complex interrelationships among environmental drivers, Green Supply Chain Management (GSCM) approaches and performance.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to analyse the complex interrelationships among environmental drivers, Green Supply Chain Management (GSCM) approaches and performance.

Design/methodology/approach

A survey was sent to a sample of managers in the field of Purchasing and Supply Management in Spanish firms. Data were analysed using SmartPLS 2.0 to test a model that relates GSCM drivers, GSCM approaches and performance.

Findings

Results show that coercive and non-coercive drivers have different implications in terms of GSCM approaches. Moreover, monitoring itself is not sufficient to improve performance; firms need to adopt collaborative practices with their suppliers. Results show that whereas collaboration has a direct effect on performance, monitoring has only an indirect relationship through collaboration.

Research limitations/implications

One of the main limitations of this study is the use of data from a single country (Spain). The main contribution of the paper is to show that coercive and non-coercive drivers have different effects on the GSCM approaches. Additionally, it quantifies the mediating effect of collaboration on the relationship between monitoring and environmental performance. As further research, the authors suggest the replication of this study in other countries (notably in emerging markets) and industrial sectors.

Practical implications

This study provides guidance to managers in the implementation of specific approaches of GSCM. For example, it shows that monitoring alone has no direct effect on performance whereas joint collaborative initiatives with suppliers have a significant effect on environmental performance.

Originality/value

This study analyses the implications in terms of drivers and performance for each GSCM approach (monitoring and collaboration), using a quantitative approach.

Details

International Journal of Operations & Production Management, vol. 35 no. 11
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3577

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 2005

Cristina Gimenez and Eva Ventura

This paper examines the logistics‐production and logistics‐marketing interfaces and their relation with the external integration. The study also investigates the causal…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper examines the logistics‐production and logistics‐marketing interfaces and their relation with the external integration. The study also investigates the causal impact of these internal and external relationships on the company's logistical performance.

Design/methodology/approach

An empirical study was conducted in the Spanish FMCG sector and the theoretical model was subjected to analysis using SEM.

Findings

The generic results derived from this study are: Internal and external integration influence each other. Integration in the logistics‐marketing interface does not lead to reductions in costs, stock‐outs and lead‐times, while the integration achieved in the logistics‐production interface does improve these performance measures, if there is no external integration. The external collaboration among supply chain members does always contribute to improving firms’ logistical performance.

Research/limitations/implications

The study has some limitations: other important members of the grocery supply chain (such as retailers, TPL, etc.) have not been considered and the effect of inter‐firm co‐ordination has only been analyzed from the perspective of the provider (as most studies do). Further research on the logistics‐marketing impact on performance should be carried out and other important supply chain members should be considered.

Practical implications

The study contributes to the existing literature by showing that the impact on performance of internal integration depends on the functional areas that are being integrated and the level of external integration.

Originality/value

It is believed that this paper will be insightful to researchers and managers in the SCM field. For researchers, this paper has provided new lines of research. And, for managers, this paper has shown that there is a positive relationship between firms’ logistical performance and SCM.

Details

International Journal of Operations & Production Management, vol. 25 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3577

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 2003

Cristina Giménez and Eva Ventura

Adversarial relationships have been traditional in business, but Supply Chain Management (SCM) entails a new perspective. SCM requires a movement away from arms‐length…

Abstract

Adversarial relationships have been traditional in business, but Supply Chain Management (SCM) entails a new perspective. SCM requires a movement away from arms‐length relationships toward partnership style relations. In this paper, we studied the Spanish grocery sector to analyze the relationship between internal and external integration processes, their effect on firms' performance and their contribution to the achievement of competitive advantage. Performance improvements are analyzed through costs, stock‐out and lead‐time reductions. The achievement of a better competitive position is measured by comparing the firm's performance with its competitors' performance.

Details

The International Journal of Logistics Management, vol. 14 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-4093

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Article
Publication date: 3 August 2012

Cristina Gimenez and Elcio M. Tachizawa

To make their supply chains more socially responsible, many companies are implementing supplier assessment tools and collaborative practices. The aim of this paper is to…

Abstract

Purpose

To make their supply chains more socially responsible, many companies are implementing supplier assessment tools and collaborative practices. The aim of this paper is to provide a systematic literature review on the governance structures used to extend sustainability to suppliers. More specifically, the authors aim to answer two questions: “What is the impact of these mechanisms or governance structures on sustainable performance?” and “What are the enablers of these mechanisms?”.

Design/methodology/approach

A structured literature review is carried out that analyses published studies, evaluates contributions, summarises knowledge and identifies managerial implications and lines for further research.

Findings

Both assessment and collaboration have a positive impact on environmental performance and corporate social responsibility, although the most recent collaborative paradigm stresses that assessment alone is not enough. Some enablers of these practices are identified.

Research limitations/implications

Although the authors believe that the right search terms have been used, the choice of these terms could be a limitation of this study. Also, the selection of the articles could be considered subjective, although the papers were reviewed by two researchers.

Practical implications

Supplier assessment and collaboration are effective in improving sustainability. However, the results also indicate that assessment alone is not enough. Firms also need to adopt a collaborative approach. Finally, a list of enablers to implement these practices is provided.

Originality/value

The paper summarises knowledge related to the impact of supplier assessment and collaboration on sustainability, and describes the enablers of such initiatives, providing some managerial implications and lines for further research.

Details

Supply Chain Management: An International Journal, vol. 17 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-8546

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Article
Publication date: 20 April 2012

Cristina Gimenez, Taco van der Vaart and Dirk Pieter van Donk

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the effectiveness of supply chain integration in different contexts. More specifically, it aims to show that supply chain…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the effectiveness of supply chain integration in different contexts. More specifically, it aims to show that supply chain integration is only effective in buyer‐supplier relationships characterised by high supply complexity.

Design/methodology/approach

A survey‐based research design is developed to measure different dimensions or aspects of supply chain integration and supply complexity. Data were collected among manufacturers in The Netherlands and Spain.

Findings

This research shows that supply chain integration increases performance if supply complexity is high, while a very limited or no influence of supply chain integration can be detected in case of low supply complexity. The results also show that in high supply complexity environments the use of structured communication means to achieve supply chain integration has a negative effect on cost performance.

Research limitations/implications

The limited sample size prohibits estimating and testing of more comprehensive models of the relationship between supply chain integration and performance. Specifically, the authors were not able to further investigate how different supply chain integration dimensions are inter‐related and mutually reinforce one another to improve performance.

Practical implications

The main managerial lesson is that, in contrast to what has been written in many books and other popular publications, high levels of supply chain integration are only necessary in environments characterised by high supply complexity.

Originality/value

This study helps to better understand context in supply chain management research. Specifically, it investigates the moderating effect of supply complexity on the integration‐performance relationship, a topic suggested by Bozarth et al. as a line for further research.

Details

International Journal of Operations & Production Management, vol. 32 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3577

Keywords

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