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Book part
Publication date: 20 September 2021

Keith D. Parry, Jessica Richards, Jo Batey and Aila Khan

Australian cricket has traditionally been an exemplar of hyper-masculine sporting conservatism. However, cricket, as with a number of Australian sports, has recently…

Abstract

Australian cricket has traditionally been an exemplar of hyper-masculine sporting conservatism. However, cricket, as with a number of Australian sports, has recently introduced an elite women's league. Despite growth in participation and funding of women's cricket, it remains poorly understood at the elite level and particularly its fans. Drawing on the concept of gender-bland sexism (Musto et al., 2017), we investigate differences in fan engagement and perceptions of men's and women's cricket matches. Through a case study of Australian Women's Big Bash cricket team the ‘Sydney Sixers’, this chapter explores how women's cricket was experienced on match-day by fans, as well as perceptions of the value and quality of attending women's professional cricket. We first undertook participant observation at matches to understand how women's cricket was delivered, experienced and engaged with by fans. These observations informed a survey which was distributed to club members. Our findings suggest that there continue to be noticeable differences in the presentation of women's matches when compared to their male equivalents, providing evidence for the presence of gender-bland sexism in areas other than sports media.

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The Professionalisation of Women’s Sport
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80043-196-6

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Article
Publication date: 29 May 2020

Faheem Gul Gilal, Naeem Gul Gilal, Beenish Tariq, Rehman Gul Gilal, Rukhsana Gul Gilal, Zhenxing Gong and Nisar Ahmed Channa

Using two theoretical lenses – social identity theory and generation cohort theory – the present study analyzes the influence of sport motivations (i.e., patriotism, drama…

Abstract

Purpose

Using two theoretical lenses – social identity theory and generation cohort theory – the present study analyzes the influence of sport motivations (i.e., patriotism, drama and excitement of the game, nostalgic associations, interest in star players and social influence) on the intentions to watch the International Cricket Council (ICC) Twenty-20 (T20) World Cup of three different generation cohorts (i.e., Generations X, Y and Z).

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected from N = 499 cricket lovers from Pakistan based on a non-probability sampling technique. Exploratory factor analysis (EFA), confirmatory factor analysis (CFA), structural equation modeling (SEM) and multi-group modeling techniques were used as methods.

Findings

SEM results show that cricket fans' intentions to watch the T20 World Cup are positively influenced by patriotism, drama and excitement of the game, and social influence. The results of multi-group modeling reveal significant differences between Generation X-ers, Y-ers and Z-ers regarding the effect of sport motivations on their intentions to watch the ICC T20 World Cup. Specifically, our findings show that for X-ers, interest in star players and nostalgic associations are the main motivations behind watching the T20 World Cup, whereas drama and excitement appeared to be an important predictor for Y-ers, and patriotism and social influence are more likely to increase Z-ers' intentions to watch the T20 World Cup.

Originality/value

This study is the first of its kind to report the motivations of Generations X, Y and Z to watch the T20 World Cup.

Details

International Journal of Sports Marketing and Sponsorship, vol. 22 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1464-6668

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Article
Publication date: 20 June 2013

Mazia Yassim

The purpose of this paper is to review practices and research within the social change and community cohesion disciplines with a view to applying them in the context of…

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410

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to review practices and research within the social change and community cohesion disciplines with a view to applying them in the context of British Muslims and cricket. The paper aims to discuss the role of sport and especially cricket to help build community cohesion and bring about social change between British Muslims and the wider British society.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper uses an inductive and critical approach.

Findings

This paper suggests that the apolitical nature of sport and the popularity of cricket within the South‐east Asian British Muslim community can be used as an effective tool to build relationships between British Muslims and the wider British society. It calls for reflexive thought and action on the part of cricket management to engage in community projects that will enhance the image of cricket as well as genuinely benefitting the society.

Originality/value

Growth of British Muslims has created a great amount of interest from a marketing perspective. Research into Islamic marketing and British Muslim consumers is still in its infancy. This paper introduces an under‐researched area of British Muslims (to date), namely British Muslim sport spectators, and calls for cricket managers and marketers to take an active approach to embarking upon social change.

Details

Journal of Islamic Marketing, vol. 4 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-0833

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 2006

Paul Kitchin

Stick Cricket is a website visited by more than 2 million unique users every month, with each user averaging more than 20 minutes per visit. The website is positioned…

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163

Abstract

Stick Cricket is a website visited by more than 2 million unique users every month, with each user averaging more than 20 minutes per visit. The website is positioned outside the sporting website category by internet research firms, and this oversight does not consider the valuable consumer segments that these types of websites may hold. This case study describes the business decisions of the Stick Cricket developers in taking a flash-based computer game and creating a website that has been transformed into a sporting portal. The factors that contribute to this success are discussed and provide useful tips for website developers and sports marketers.

Details

International Journal of Sports Marketing and Sponsorship, vol. 8 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1464-6668

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Article
Publication date: 6 March 2007

Roger Bennett, Rehnuma Ali‐Choudhury and Wendy Mousley

The aim of this paper is to examine the factors that induced people to follow the 2005 Ashes cricket series on television and to explore the implications of these factors…

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2979

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this paper is to examine the factors that induced people to follow the 2005 Ashes cricket series on television and to explore the implications of these factors for the marketing of English cricket as a brand.

Design/methodology/approach

A total of 427 members of the public who reported that they had watched at least part of the 2005 Ashes series on television were questioned about their motives for having done so. Specific motives were then related to viewing intensity and to an individual's intention to follow cricket in the future.

Findings

The study finds that viewers who had been motivated to watch the Ashes series because of cricket's nostalgic associations with England's past were more likely than others to have followed the series intensively and to state that they would continue to be interested in cricket. Patriotic motivations led to short‐ but not to long‐term support. Social pressure, prior involvement with cricket, and several variables identified from a review of the general academic literature in the sports marketing area also exerted significant influences on future intentions to watch cricket.

Research limitations/implications

It was not feasible to establish the socio‐demographic, cultural and economic backgrounds of individuals who exhibited strong tendencies in relation to the motivations covered by the study. Thus it was not possible to relate these background characteristics to decisions to follow cricket in the longer period.

Practical implications

The results suggest that English cricket may indeed be regarded as a brand, and that certain aspects of cricket's brand identity should be incorporated into marketing communications that promote the sport.

Originality/value

This was the first empirical study to analyse the factors underlying the highly successful rebranding of English cricket that occurred between 1997 and 2004.

Details

Journal of Product & Brand Management, vol. 16 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1061-0421

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Article
Publication date: 6 August 2019

Javed Siddiqui, Sofia Yasmin and Christopher Humphrey

The purpose of this paper is to analyse the shifting nature of governance reforms, both at global and national levels, in the increasingly commercialised game of cricket

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to analyse the shifting nature of governance reforms, both at global and national levels, in the increasingly commercialised game of cricket. The authors explore the inter-relationship and linkages between governance and commercialism, and in the process, question the contemporary reliance placed on governance as a generic counter-commercialist force and accountability aid.

Design/methodology/approach

The analysis is based on a comprehensive analysis of cricketing archives, newspapers and online media. The authors specifically utilise a range of review reports, governance and accounting information from annual reports and websites of the International Cricket Council (ICC) as well as different national cricket governing bodies (NCBs).

Findings

The paper vividly demonstrates the importance of recognising the specific significance of different cultural traditions and modes of organising – and not presuming a particular form of impact. The findings highlight that the adoption of a dominant market logic by cricket administrators has resulted in a shift in the balance of power in favour of non-western nations. India has emerged as the clear leader and driving force shaping the way cricket is globally governed. The consequences have been profound but not in terms of delivering, enhanced standards of transparency and accountability. Drawing on institutional theory, the paper argues that the scale of the Board of Cricket Control of India’s financial and operational control over the ICC has not only led to an increasingly commercialised game but engendered divergent and highly questionable standards of governance at the level of NCBs.

Originality/value

Unlike other global games, cricket has an imperialistic root, and has gone through the process of globalisation in relatively recent times. Also, the commercialisation of cricket has resulted in the global economic and power base shifting from the West to the East, giving us the opportunity to study the dynamics between commercialisation and governance in a quite different globalisation context that allows an assessment to be made of the culturally contingent nature of governance as a substantive organising force.

Details

Accounting, Auditing & Accountability Journal, vol. 32 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-3574

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Article
Publication date: 6 February 2009

Michael Goldman and Kate Johns

The purpose of this study is to document and analyse Standard Bank of South Africa's sponsorship of Standard Bank Pro20 Cricket as a case study of effective cricket

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2199

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to document and analyse Standard Bank of South Africa's sponsorship of Standard Bank Pro20 Cricket as a case study of effective cricket, stadium and broadcast sponsorship activation.

Design/methodology/approach

An in‐depth case study methodology is employed, drawing on quantitative and qualitative data.

Findings

The main conclusion is that a partnership approach to sponsorship and the creative use of multiple sponsorship activations contributes to the achievement of sponsorship objectives.

Research limitations/implications

The study is limited to one case of a large‐scale sponsor of a major international sport. As such, it has limited generalisability to dissimilar sponsorship situations.

Practical implications

The case documented and analysed suggests that sponsoring organisations may increase their return on sponsorship investment through the adoption of a partnership approach to sponsorship.

Originality/value

The study answers the call of Irwin, Zwick and Sutton, Chadwick and others to significantly increase the researching of sports marketing theory and practice outside traditional Western markets. It documents the creative leverage of a new cricket format that has received no attention in the academic literature, although the 20‐over game continues to enjoy widespread and strong sponsor, media and fan support.

Details

Management Decision, vol. 47 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

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Article
Publication date: 30 September 2013

Dominic Malcolm

– The purpose of this paper is to examine the claims made for the potential of sports such as cricket to reduce social conflict and engender peace.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the claims made for the potential of sports such as cricket to reduce social conflict and engender peace.

Design/methodology/approach

The use of an Eliasian sociological perspective to analyze historical documentary sources and contemporary media analyses of narratives of the role of violence and its regulation in cricket.

Findings

Violence and its regulation interweave with the broader development of cricket and remain central concerns in status conflicts between competing social groups involved in the game. This ranges from evidence of an increasing internalization of expectations regarding the regulation of violence to the stratification of social groups according to beliefs about differing uses of and attitudes towards violence.

Originality/value

This paper provides the first long-term analysis of violence trends in relation to cricket, and provides clarification of some problematic aspects of Elias’ sociological framework.

Details

Journal of Aggression, Conflict and Peace Research, vol. 5 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-6599

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Article
Publication date: 17 August 2018

Muhammad Kashif, P.M.P Fernando and S.I. Wijenayake

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the effect of patriotism, nostalgia, drama and excitement of the game, and interest in star players to predict fans’ intentions…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the effect of patriotism, nostalgia, drama and excitement of the game, and interest in star players to predict fans’ intentions to follow one-day cricket in near future. Furthermore, social influence is positioned as a moderator to enrich the understanding of fans’ motives to follow one-day cricket.

Design/methodology/approach

The data are collected by means of a cross-sectional survey conducted among 609 university students enroled in Pakistani and Sri Lankan universities. The collected data are analysed by employing a structural equation modelling procedures to reach meaningful conclusions.

Findings

The variables of patriotism, nostalgic associations, excitement and drama of the game, and interest in star players are found to positively relate to the fans’ intentions to follow one-day cricket in near future. However, the moderating effects of social influence only moderated with interest in star players, which has practical and theoretical implications.

Originality/value

The study is an original contribution to the field of sports marketing. The proposed relationships are based on social identity theory paradigm. Furthermore, the moderating effects of social influence and a multi-country data are unique to this study. Finally, in previous studies, football fans’ motivation and test-match cricket fans’ motivations are studied, hence one-day cricket as a context is also unique to this study.

Details

International Journal of Sports Marketing and Sponsorship, vol. 20 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1464-6668

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 2005

Maria K. Hopwood

The main reason for conducting this research was to conduct an analysis of the extent of public relations activity in domestic first‐class cricket in an attempt to offer a…

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3234

Abstract

Purpose

The main reason for conducting this research was to conduct an analysis of the extent of public relations activity in domestic first‐class cricket in an attempt to offer a strategy for effective, proactive public relations.

Design/methodology/approach

The research objectives were achieved by using an exploratory case study approach to evaluate the extent of public relations within the two cricket clubs, Durham County Cricket Club and Yorkshire County Cricket Club. The constructivist approach was adopted, as primary qualitative research strategies provided the bulk of the findings. A purposive sample of respondents was identified for semi‐structured, open‐ended interviews that were conducted face‐to‐face and via the telephone.

Findings

Public relations is extremely important at Durham County Cricket Club. Durham CCC's approach to public relations is the exception rather than the rule amongst the 18 first‐class counties. Yorkshire CCC does not have a dedicated public relations professional on the marketing team. Though there is clearly a place for public relations, other commercial techniques seem to be more important at Yorkshire. The consensus is that public relations is essential to the future success of the sport but the reality is that it is not fully implemented to the extent that it should be or that many in the game would like it to be. If cricket is to have a viable future, it must address its image problems and become more appealing to a demographically different audience than has traditionally been the case. Public relations, more than the other elements of the contemporary promotional mix, offers a potential solution.

Research limitations/implications

The major limitation to this research was that interviews could not be arranged with a Yorkshire player to balance that held with the Durham player. The information gathered by the researcher was necessarily indirect but it was felt that this did not invalidate the research, as a range of secondary sources was used to underpin the primary research findings. As this research was a snapshot in time, it would be useful to conduct further regular research in order to monitor changes in attitudes and approach to public relations in cricket.

Practical implications

The findings from this research are applicable to all sports and can be implemented and adapted accordingly. It is felt that all sports organisations regularly need to review their communications strategies and implement public relations much more widely.

Originality/value

No such research has previously been conducted and all the findings and recommendations are original. Durham CCC has already implemented some of the proposals and the author's continuing work with other sports organisations has been founded on this research.

Details

Corporate Communications: An International Journal, vol. 10 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1356-3289

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