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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1984

Terry E. Ashforth and Geoffrey N. Soutar

Research among credit unions in Western Australia is reported in which directors and managers of credit unions expressed their attitudes with regard to the corporate…

Abstract

Research among credit unions in Western Australia is reported in which directors and managers of credit unions expressed their attitudes with regard to the corporate objectives of their organisation, and future directions of development for the credit union movement are suggested.

Details

International Journal of Bank Marketing, vol. 2 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-2323

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Article
Publication date: 23 September 2014

Rebecca Boden and Salima Yassia Paul

This paper aims to explore the reasons for the apparent failure of many UK firms to achieve the competitive advantages indicated in largely positivist literature through…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to explore the reasons for the apparent failure of many UK firms to achieve the competitive advantages indicated in largely positivist literature through the management of their trade credit positions.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper utilises data from a set of semi-structured interviews with trade credit managers in firms and is the first substantial qualitative study of the intra-firm aspects of trade credit management in the UK. Through this approach, we explore the reasons why the theoretical promise of trade credit may or may not be realised.

Findings

The principal findings relate to the importance of three organisational attributes (skills/awareness, communication and structural position of the activity in the firm). That is, trade credit management should be regarded as a relational activity and not merely a narrow technical function. The paper finds that there is no generic formulation of these attributes that can deliver on the promise of trade credit identified in the extant literature. Rather, individual firms must adapt themselves to suit their circumstances.

Practical implications

This paper will be of interest to and is relevant for companies, accounting professionals and policymakers. Trade credit represents a significant area of commercial risk, and the problems experienced with its effective management have previously proved somewhat intractable.

Originality/value

This paper reports on the first substantial piece of UK work to look at the actualities of how trade credit is managed within firms and what the implications of this are.

Details

Qualitative Research in Accounting & Management, vol. 11 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1176-6093

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1987

J. Innes

External management auditing has links with — but is different from — external financial auditing, internal operational auditing and management consultancy. The reasons…

Abstract

External management auditing has links with — but is different from — external financial auditing, internal operational auditing and management consultancy. The reasons for conducting external management audits are considered, particularly in relation to the accountability of corporate management, and the interests of various potential user groups. To obtain empirical evidence, a random sample survey of UK credit managers was carried out; response was almost 50 per cent. Results of the survey are summarised. Essentially, the conclusion was that credit managers strongly favoured external management audit reports.

Details

Managerial Auditing Journal, vol. 2 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-6902

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Article
Publication date: 10 February 2020

Francesco Campanella, Francesco Gangi, Mario Mustilli and Luana Serino

This paper aims to deal with the perceptions of banks’ managers about some criteria for assessing creditworthiness related to firms and how these criteria affect…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to deal with the perceptions of banks’ managers about some criteria for assessing creditworthiness related to firms and how these criteria affect non-performing loans (NPLs). The paper wants to respond to the following research question: “Which criteria influence the magnitude of NPLs?” The evidence is based on the improvement of credit quality in the Italian banking system, which the authors study in aggregate and size-specific analyses, creating two subsamples (large and small banks).

Design/methodology/approach

The methodology used was a mixed method approach. The values of the variables were quantified according to the information derived from Thomson Reuters (Eikon, Datastream), the financial reporting of the banks and questionnaires directly administered to the bank managers.

Findings

This research about loans selection criteria provides useful indications for “The Basel Framework”. The results show that managers of the large banks are improving the approach of allocating the loans; the managers of the small banks are getting worse in the period 2006-2016. Therefore, it should be valuable to build a new standard about qualitative and quantitative criteria to recognize credit risk. In particular, these criteria could be adopted to reduce NPLs, and they should be different in small banks and large banks.

Originality/value

The study is part of empirical research investigating the causes of the significant increase in NPLs in the Italian banking system in 2006-2016. Most research interprets the increase in NPLs in the Italian banking system only as an effect of the crisis in the Italian entrepreneurial system. This research offers a different interpretation of the problem, interpreting the phenomenon as a delay of the banking system in investing in an effective information criterion.

Details

Meditari Accountancy Research, vol. 28 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2049-372X

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Article
Publication date: 1 July 1996

This special “Anbar Abstracts” issue of Women in Management Review is split into five sections covering abstracts under the following headings: Leadership Styles and…

Abstract

This special “Anbar Abstracts” issue of Women in Management Review is split into five sections covering abstracts under the following headings: Leadership Styles and Personality; Recruitment and Career Management; Dependant Care and Health/Family Issues; Job Evaluation, Appraisal and Equal Pay; Discrimination and Equal Opportunities.

Details

Women in Management Review, vol. 11 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0964-9425

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Article
Publication date: 7 November 2016

Candauda Arachchige Saliya and Kelum Jayasinghe

The purpose of this paper is to focus on the enterprise lending and control process in closely held banks, with special reference to Sri Lanka. It explores how those…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to focus on the enterprise lending and control process in closely held banks, with special reference to Sri Lanka. It explores how those processes are being influenced by the distinctive cultural and political processes at organizational and societal levels.

Design/methodology/approach

The study relies on three cases built upon the life experiences of several employees in a closely held bank, articulating multiple sources of evidence: interviews, observations, documents, archival records, open-ended questionnaires, internet conversations and exchange of e-mails. The data analysis adopts cultural political economy theory.

Findings

The study’s findings reveal how cultural and political factors, such as egoistic motives and politics, gifts/rewards and a manipulative culture, along with exploitative and discriminatory politics at organizational and societal levels, articulate into the enterprise lending and control process (“five Cs”) in closely held banks. “Rational” enterprise lending and control processes in this context merely become a “ceremonial” practice, serving the petty interest of powerful capitalist business owners. Whereas previous studies emphasize that the criteria (five Cs) discriminate against ordinary people, as distinct from the élite, the findings of this study implicate that over and above that the criteria are set aside when it suits in order to favor or accommodate the élite.

Originality/value

The paper provides a “qualitative inquiry” on how cultural politics at organizational and societal-level effect on enterprise lending and control process within closely held banks in less developed countries (LDCs). The previous studies on bank lending and control used either large-scale surveys or alternatively devoted their interest toward the role and impact of accounting in World Bank and IMF-led lending schemes and policies, particularly in LDCs.

Details

Journal of Accounting in Emerging Economies, vol. 6 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-1168

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Article
Publication date: 31 October 2008

Sameer Kumar, Anthony D. Wolfe and Katherine A. Wolfe

The credit initiation process for mid‐level corporate credit card customers involves dependencies on multiple people across divisions considered as a critical function for…

Abstract

Purpose

The credit initiation process for mid‐level corporate credit card customers involves dependencies on multiple people across divisions considered as a critical function for a US financial services company. Increasing efficiency and effectiveness of the process could save time and money for the company. The purpose of this study is to analyze the process using Six Sigma DMAIC tools in order to determine inefficiencies; specifically, to decrease the number of days it takes from the time a company submits a request, to the time it is approved from 20 days to 15 days, resulting in a 25 percent improvement in throughput.

Design/methodology/approach

The process improvement tool used is the Six Sigma DMAIC methodology, in addition to cause‐and‐effect diagrams and the development of poka‐yokes.

Findings

This study found several areas for improvement in the process studied. Using statistical testing, bottlenecks in the process were identified. Process changes are suggested, as well as, new measures that can be implemented to prevent variance in the process.

Practical implications

Business operations can benefit from evaluating key processes in this way to strengthen procedures and eliminate variation. The managers at the financial services operation studied will be able to implement the recommended process to improve efficiency and throughput.

Research limitations/implications

Limitations exist that may prevent the recommendations from being carried out. These limitations lie in elements that are outside the control of the credit manager, such as the actions of the sales team and the approval of executive management. Success of this project hinges on cooperation from these parties.

Originality/value

The process under evaluation in the study has never before been examined with such scrutiny. The outcome of the study and recommendations for improvement will be of great value to the financial services operation studied. Other service organizations, however, can learn from the Six Sigma process executed for this study as well. Six Sigma is a valuable methodology that can be applied to a wide variety of organizations and business processes.

Details

International Journal of Productivity and Performance Management, vol. 57 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-0401

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Article
Publication date: 7 November 2016

Alexander Rad

This paper aims to explore the interplay between risk management and control systems in banks, specifically investigating the managerial intentions underlying the design…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to explore the interplay between risk management and control systems in banks, specifically investigating the managerial intentions underlying the design of management control systems.

Design/methodology/approach

This study is based on 31 interviews with personnel of two banks in a European country.

Findings

The main finding is that belief systems drive the interplay between risk management and control systems in the studied banks. In several instances, belief systems and boundary systems were operating complementarily. Cross-case analyses of the two banks demonstrate that risk management (i.e. the Basel II Accord) replaced established operating procedures for loan origination and portfolio monitoring at the first bank, whereas senior managers suppressed Basel II to maintain established loan origination and portfolio monitoring procedures at the second one.

Originality/value

This is one of very few studies investigating the interplay between risk management and control systems in banks.

Details

Journal of Accounting & Organizational Change, vol. 12 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1832-5912

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Book part
Publication date: 4 December 2003

David Deakins, Monder Ram, David Smallbone and Margaret Fletcher

This chapter is concerned with access to bank finance by ethnic minority businesses (EMBs) in the U.K., focusing particularly on the process of decision-making by bank…

Abstract

This chapter is concerned with access to bank finance by ethnic minority businesses (EMBs) in the U.K., focusing particularly on the process of decision-making by bank managers with respect to credit applications by entrepreneurs from ethnic minority groups. The results reported in this chapter are taken from a major U.K. study that included two large scale surveys of EMB owners and a white control group, case studies with ethnic minority entrepreneurs and a programme of interviews with business support agencies. Whilst referring to other evidence, this chapter focuses on the findings from a series of interviews with bank representatives. The U.K. study was funded by the British Bankers’ Association (BBA), the Bank of England and the Small Business Service and supported by the Commission for Racial Equality.

Details

Ethnic Entrepreneurship: Structure and Process
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-220-7

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2003

Deborah Ralston and April Wright

Sound lending procedures in retail financial institutions involve identifying high‐risk applicants, modifying loan conditions such as security requirements, and monitoring…

Abstract

Sound lending procedures in retail financial institutions involve identifying high‐risk applicants, modifying loan conditions such as security requirements, and monitoring repayments post‐loan approval. For managers of credit unions, this procedure is complicated by the need to achieve balance between the institution’s social objective of improving loan accessibility so members can attain lifestyle goals and the possibility of reducing the institution’s viability through loan default. The results of our survey of Australian credit unions, in which 70 per cent of respondents reported experiencing some bankruptcy‐related default on personal loans, indicate managers do not impose more stringent lending conditions on high‐risk borrowers. However, social and viability objectives could be better balanced through careful loan monitoring and timely arrears practices.

Details

International Journal of Bank Marketing, vol. 21 no. 6/7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-2323

Keywords

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