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Article
Publication date: 15 February 2021

Jae Min Lee and Yoon G. Lee

The purpose of this study is to construct composite index variables of credit attitude using six attitudinal variables. This study also examines the relationship between…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to construct composite index variables of credit attitude using six attitudinal variables. This study also examines the relationship between consumer credit attitude and credit card debt behaviors.

Design/methodology/approach

This study used the pooled dataset of the 2010 and 2013 Survey of Consumer Finances (SCF) released by the Federal Reserve Board. A total of 8,417 households were used as our analytic sample. The credit card indices were constructed using factor analysis with polychoric correlations. Factors of the credit card debt behaviors were estimated using hierarchical logistic regression models.

Findings

The results of factor analysis identified two credit attitude indices (wants and needs). The results of hierarchical logistic regression analyses show that the credit attitude indices have a positive influence on payment behaviors; households with more favorable attitudes about credit use for non-necessities (wants) were more likely to hold an outstanding credit card balance, have irregular payment practice and pay a revolving charge.

Originality/value

Although there is ample documentation in the literature of credit behavior, the current literature is deficient in some areas for not addressing unobserved consumer attitudinal dispositions. Further, the separate treatment of selected survey items or an additive scale of survey items has been widely used; however, this approach cannot capture multidimensional characteristics among attitudinal items if credit attitude is not necessarily unidimensional. In response to the shortfall in the extant literature on credit card behavior, this study examined multidimensional aspects of credit attitude as a determinant of credit card debt behavior through methodological justification. Implications for future research and practitioners are provided.

Details

Review of Behavioral Finance, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1940-5979

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Article
Publication date: 7 June 2011

Lili Wang, Wei Lv and Lin Jiang

The present research attempts to address what kinds of attitude variables influence individuals' debt behavior. Although credit card debt has been extensively documented…

Abstract

Purpose

The present research attempts to address what kinds of attitude variables influence individuals' debt behavior. Although credit card debt has been extensively documented recently, the main focus is on the pure amount of debt. Little research is concerned with the source of credit card debt. This research tries to investigate how different attitude variables affect revolving credit card use and petty installment use which are two main sources of credit card debt. It is generally accepted that attitude variables are one of the causes of credit card misuse. But there is no research to compare the differential effect of each factor in one model. The present research tries to use statistical method to find out the distinctive effect of each attitude factor.

Design/methodology/approach

The study was conducted by using mail‐in questionnaires, which were sent to credit card holders who were using or had used either revolving credit or petty installment plans. After reliability and validity tests, stepwise regression model has been used to test the differential effect of each attitude variable.

Findings

According to regression functions, it was found that attitude variables had a wonderful explanatory power in accounting for revolving credit use and petty installment use. Specifically, it was found that revolving credit use and petty installment use were closely related to attitudes about credit card, money, and debt. Risk attitude efficiently predicted petty installment use; however, it did not correlate with revolving credit use. Meanwhile, it was found that all of the attitude factors account for 82.1 percent of variance for revolving credit use. In contrast, they account for 41.6 percent of variance for petty installment use. The findings shed light on the role of attitude variables in debt behavior. Moreover, the paper identifies the specific role of different attitude variables, which has great implications for practice.

Originality/value

Existing research has significantly clarified credit card debt issues, but there are still some gaps to fill in. For one, although the previous literature tests both separate effects and joint effects, it ignores some important variables, such as attitude variables. Meanwhile, previous research focuses on single variables most of the time, such as credit card attitude and debt attitude, and little research has simultaneously considered a bunch of attitude factors simultaneously. In summary, further exploration of the attitude factors is necessary. Additionally, previous researchers have focused only on the final consequences of credit usage – the outstanding balance or credit card debt rather than the behavior which triggers credit card debt. The present research aims to address these two questions.

Details

Nankai Business Review International, vol. 2 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-8749

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Article
Publication date: 16 November 2012

Francesco Pattarin and Stefano Cosma

Consumer credit as a proportion of household debt has grown considerably during the last 20 years across many developed countries. A fairly extensive literature from the…

Abstract

Purpose

Consumer credit as a proportion of household debt has grown considerably during the last 20 years across many developed countries. A fairly extensive literature from the field of empirical psychology has provided evidence that personality factors and attitudes may influence individuals’ debt financing decisions. The purpose of this paper is to investigate the importance of attitude to credit and three main research questions are addressed. Is there any relationship between attitude and use of consumer credit? Are there any differences between the attitudes of credit users and non‐users that can be associated with motivations for using consumer credit? Does attitude towards credit affect preferences for the financing of consumption?

Design/methodology/approach

The authors provide answers based on the results of an original survey of the use of consumer credit conducted on a wide sample of Italian households, which allowed the authors to asses the respondents’ attitudes towards credit and to examine them with respect to credit decisions, controlling for several socio‐economic variables.

Findings

The findings indicate that the influence of attitude on consumer credit decisions cannot be ruled out. Attitude toward credit appears to play an important role and is significantly related to motivations for using credit and to the method of choice for financing consumption.

Originality/value

This study improves on most existing research on these topics in the particularly large size and scope of the sample, and also because several studies from the psychological field lack a thorough assessment of household economic conditions and expectations.

Details

Review of Behavioural Finance, vol. 4 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1940-5979

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Article
Publication date: 30 October 2009

Alex Wang

This paper aims to test the relations among consumers' attitudes toward disclosures in credit card issuers' print ads, attitudes toward credit card issuers' CSR practices…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to test the relations among consumers' attitudes toward disclosures in credit card issuers' print ads, attitudes toward credit card issuers' CSR practices, and attitudes toward credit card issuers in general, with a survey study.

Design/methodology/approach

A survey study with a convenient sampling consisting of college students is used to test the relations among consumers' attitudes toward disclosures in credit card issuers' print ads, attitudes toward credit card issuers' CSR practices, and attitudes toward credit card issuers in general.

Findings

The results suggest that students' positive attitudes toward disclosures positively enhance their attitudes toward credit card issuers and credit card issuers' CSR practices. More importantly, students' attitudes toward credit card issuers' CSR practices mediate their attitudes toward disclosures on enhancing their attitudes toward credit card issuers.

Research limitations/implications

Disclosures are increasingly common in advertisements for a range of products, including banking, cigarettes, over‐the‐counter drugs, and diet products. Thus, the study's results can also be applicable for corporations that advertise financial and health‐related product or services. Despite the inherent limitations of this study (e.g. context‐specific, convenience sample, and limited product types) that have to be confirmed in future research, future research should examine the relationship between various practices of disclosures and different aspects of CSR practices.

Practical implications

Based on this study's results, credit card issuers should improve their practices of disclosures and communicate their disclosures better to college students. Since a positive relationship between consumer responses and CSR practices is evident, projecting good CSR practices can also enhance credit card issuers' corporate images.

Originality/value

The paper primarily studies the impact of advertising disclosures and CSR practices on corporate image from college students' perspective. The research adds value to the existing literature on CSR, which is important to both academic researchers and practitioners.

Details

Management Research News, vol. 32 no. 12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0140-9174

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Article
Publication date: 31 August 2012

Matthew Tingchi Liu, Rongwei Chu, IpKin Anthony Wong, Miguel Angel Zúñiga, Yan Meng and Chuan Pang

The purpose of this paper is to examine the relationship among affective loyalty, perceived benefits, attitude towards co‐branded products and the intention to use such products.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the relationship among affective loyalty, perceived benefits, attitude towards co‐branded products and the intention to use such products.

Design/methodology/approach

In total, 433 valid responses were collected from active bank/department store co‐branded credit card holders, from four major Chinese cities. Regression and t‐test analyses were used to test the hypotheses.

Findings

The findings revealed that affective loyalty to the bank and the department store, as well as perceived credit card benefits, all positively influence consumers' attitude toward bank/department store co‐branded credit cards. Additionally, results showed a positive relationship between attitude and intention. Moreover, gender differences were also found to be significant in affective loyalty to the bank and the department store, as well as with the intention to use co‐branded credit cards.

Originality/value

The paper contributes to the co‐branding literature by gaining a better understanding of co‐branded partners in symbiotic marketing collaboration.

Details

Asia Pacific Journal of Marketing and Logistics, vol. 24 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-5855

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 2008

Ian Phau and Charise Woo

The purpose of this paper is to investigate money attitudes and credit card usage, between compulsive and non‐compulsive buyers, of young Australians. It also serves to…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate money attitudes and credit card usage, between compulsive and non‐compulsive buyers, of young Australians. It also serves to validate the money attitude scale (MAS) using an Australian sample.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected using a mall intercept method in a major shopping complex in Perth, Western Australia. A self‐administered questionnaire was distributed and recorded a response rate of 18 per cent.

Findings

Compulsive buyers are more likely to perceive money as a source of power and prestige. They are also more frequent users of credit cards and are more likely to bargain hunt. There are no differences between compulsive and non‐compulsive buyers for the dimensions of time retention, distrust, and anxiety of the MAS.

Research limitations/implications

The study has only captured young adult Australians and should not be generalized across other demographics and national consumers. Studies on compulsive behaviour of online shopping and a comparison between fashion and non‐fashion related variables could also be explored.

Practical implications

Firms should consider using advertising campaigns that portray images of status and prestige in order to appeal to young adults. They could utilize aggressive in‐store promotion and selling techniques and highlight the discount or best buy slogans. For the credit card companies and banks, word‐of‐mouth through family and friends are better promotional tools to attract users. Marketers and policy makers are recommended to incorporate consumer education programs for young adults to build skills to counter financial problems.

Originality/value

This is the first Australian study that examined money attitudes, credit card usage and compulsive behaviour. Further the MAS scale is validated with the addition of the “bargain hunting” variable.

Details

Marketing Intelligence & Planning, vol. 26 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-4503

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1988

Jean‐Charles Chebat, Michel Laroche and Helen Malette

A comparison of attitudes towards credit cards and purchase behaviours reveals some major differences between French and English Canadians. The determinants of frequency…

Abstract

A comparison of attitudes towards credit cards and purchase behaviours reveals some major differences between French and English Canadians. The determinants of frequency of usage are identified for both groups and reveal five attitudinal factors. Finally, it is shown that increased income does not lead to convergence of the two subcultures.

Details

International Journal of Bank Marketing, vol. 6 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-2323

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Article
Publication date: 12 April 2019

Simona Cosma, Stefano Cosma and Alessandro M. Peluso

The purpose of this paper is to highlight opportunities for the banking sector arising from the population’s aging and the expected reduction in pension incomes. Home…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to highlight opportunities for the banking sector arising from the population’s aging and the expected reduction in pension incomes. Home equity conversion (HEC) instruments are a potentially useful way of restoring households’ finances and satisfying their needs, with implications for the demand for financial services.

Design/methodology/approach

By using an ordered probit regression model, the paper analyzes data obtained from a survey of 2,000 Italian households.

Findings

The main finding of this paper is that individuals with greater familiarity with consumer credit, a cognitive and decision-making approach favorable to use of credit, and an internal locus of control show greater interest in various forms of equity conversion.

Originality/value

This paper extends the analysis of the determinants of individuals’ interest in HEC products. It focuses more closely than the existing literature on households’ credit behaviors, attitudes toward credit and locus of control. The paper helps identify the potential targets of marketing campaigns and commercial proposals, and highlights the levers that the banks can focus on in communicating with customers and future prospects. Moreover, this paper suggests that there is a need to develop greater awareness on the part of people who could be interested in these products. Therefore, appropriate financial education projects should be implemented to develop a better “credit” culture, with due appreciation of the usefulness of credit as a means of supporting household budgets.

Details

International Journal of Bank Marketing, vol. 37 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-2323

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Article
Publication date: 29 March 2021

Delia Cornea

This study analyzes how cultural and social values shape specific attitudes toward credit cards and indebtedness and consumption behavior.

Abstract

Purpose

This study analyzes how cultural and social values shape specific attitudes toward credit cards and indebtedness and consumption behavior.

Design/methodology/approach

The study uses a panel dataset for a selection of European Union countries from 2003 to 2016. The relation between credit card use and social and cultural attitudes is constructed by controlling for past habits in payment behavior and cross-substitution with alternative payment instruments by employing a dynamic panel data analysis based on the system Generalized Method of Moments (GMM) estimator.

Findings

The total value of credit card payments positively correlated with values emphasizing risk-taking attitudes. When analyzing the propensity of using these instruments for larger purchases, the level of trust is the most relevant predictor. However, the results seemed region-specific with some variables correlating consumption behavior with credit card usage depending on the political and the economic background of the country. Moreover, risk-taking attitudes prevail when they are related to the extent to which countries rely on cash as a preferred payment instrument. Also, credit card usage is mainly explained by past habits and the economic context.

Originality/value

The model expands on previous credit card transaction research by including an additional set of cultural values able to account for the complex nature of payment instruments and their effects on indebtedness and consumption behavior.

Details

Managerial Finance, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4358

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 2006

Deirdre O'Loughlin and Isabelle Szmigin

This research seeks to explore current attitudes, motivations and behaviours in relation to student credit and debt consumption in the UK and Ireland.

Abstract

Purpose

This research seeks to explore current attitudes, motivations and behaviours in relation to student credit and debt consumption in the UK and Ireland.

Design/methodology/approach

Key qualitative consumer research based on 20 interviews with Irish and UK higher education students is presented.

Findings

The findings highlight that, while the UK and Irish student contexts are significantly different in terms of accommodation costs, tuition fees and living expenses, many Irish students reported relatively high debt levels, with some exceeding their UK counterparts. The research identifies key contextual factors associated with the credit‐friendly environment in which students live in addition to shedding light on student orientation towards credit and debt, with specific conclusions for future student debt.

Research limitations/ implications

Given the rise in debt and its detrimental consequences, the study has far‐reaching implications for policy makers, consumer agencies financial providers and marketers in terms of creating an environment where good student financial capability and management is developed and facilitated through increased financial education and regulation. The research has implications for other western countries in terms of predicting comparative trends in student credit and debt attitude and behaviour.

Originality/value

This paper addresses the lack of analytical and academic commentary exploring the dynamics and nature of student credit and debt, particularly within an Irish context, in addition to providing a cross‐cultural comparison between credit and debt consumption in Ireland, where debt is a relatively new phenomenon, and the UK, a country well‐entrenched in debt.

Details

Journal of Consumer Marketing, vol. 23 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0736-3761

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