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Article
Publication date: 6 February 2017

Sophie Hennekam and Dawn Bennett

The purpose of this paper is to examine the precarious nature of creative industries (CIs) work in Australia, Canada and the Netherlands, with a focus on job security…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the precarious nature of creative industries (CIs) work in Australia, Canada and the Netherlands, with a focus on job security, initial and on-going training and education, and access to benefits and protection.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper reports from a largely qualitative study featuring an in-depth survey answered by 752 creative workers in the three locations.

Findings

Survey data identified common themes including an increase in non-standard forms of employment and the persistence of precarious work across the career lifespan; criticism of initial education and training with particular reference to business skills; the need for and challenges of life-long professional learning; and lack of awareness about and access to benefits and protection. Respondents also reported multiple roles across and beyond the CIs.

Practical implications

The presence of common themes suggests avenues for future, targeted creative workforce research and signals the need for change and action by CIs educators, policy makers and representative organizations such as trade unions.

Originality/value

While precarious labour is common across the CIs and has attracted the attention of researchers worldwide, a lack of comparative studies has made it difficult to identify themes or issues that are common across multiple locations.

Details

Personnel Review, vol. 46 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 28 July 2020

Milton Mayfield, Jacqueline Mayfield and Kathy Qing Ma

While there has been an abundance of research on the positive outcomes of creative environment, little work has been done on how creative environment influences the…

Abstract

Purpose

While there has been an abundance of research on the positive outcomes of creative environment, little work has been done on how creative environment influences the general work outcomes of noncreative specialist workers. The paper aims to fill this void by examining the influence of creative environment on absenteeism among garden variety workers and the mediating role of job satisfaction.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper uses cross-sectional data of 116 noncreative specialist workers to empirically test the hypotheses. The authors used covariance-based structural equation modeling (SEM) through the lavaan package for the statistical software R.

Findings

Results found that, for a cross section of noncreative specialist workers, a one standard deviation increase in a worker's creative environment would decrease that worker's absenteeism by 0.447 standard deviation. The creative environment also explained 11.3% of the variance in absenteeism. Subsequent analysis showed that job satisfaction fully mediated the relationship between the creative environment and absenteeism and that the results were resistant to omitted variable bias.

Originality/value

The study contributes to theory and practice by showing empirically that creative environment leads to positive work outcomes, despite the innovation level required by the job. This study advances research on creative environment by targeting the garden variety workers, underscores the importance of cultivating a creative environment and calls attention to the complexity of the creativity–job affect link.

Details

Journal of Organizational Change Management, vol. 33 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0953-4814

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Article
Publication date: 18 May 2015

Benjamin Stuart Rodney Farr-Wharton, Kerry Brown, Robyn Keast and Yuliya Shymko

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the impact of organisational business acumen and social network structure on the earnings and labour precarity experienced by…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the impact of organisational business acumen and social network structure on the earnings and labour precarity experienced by creative industry workers.

Design/methodology/approach

Results from a survey that collected data from a random sample of 289 creative workers are analysed using structural equation modelling. Mediating effects of social network structure are explored.

Findings

Results support the qualitative findings of Crombie and Hagoort (2010) who claim that organisational business acumen is a significant enabler for creative workers. Further, social network structure has a partial mediating effect in mitigating labour precarity.

Research limitations/implications

This exploratory study is novel in its use of a quantitative approach to understand the relationship between labour and social network dynamics of the creative industries. For this reason, developed scales, while robust in exploratory and confirmatory factor analysis, warrant further application and maturity.

Practical implications

The organisational business acumen of creative workers is found to mitigate labour precarity and increase perceived earnings.

Social implications

The results from this study call for policy and management shifts, to focus attention on developing business proficiency of creative workers, in an effort to curb labour precarity in the creative industries, and enhance positive spillovers into other sectors.

Originality/value

The paper fills a gap in knowledge regarding the impact of organisational business acumen and social network structure on the pay and working conditions of people working in a sector that is dominated by self-employed and freelance arrangements.

Details

Management Decision, vol. 53 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 19 October 2015

Roger Martin, Richard Florida, Melissa Pogue and Charlotta Mellander

This paper aims to marry Michael Porter’s industrial cluster theory of traded and local clusters to Richard Florida’s occupational approach of creative and routine workers

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to marry Michael Porter’s industrial cluster theory of traded and local clusters to Richard Florida’s occupational approach of creative and routine workers to gain a better understanding of the process of economic development.

Design/methodology/approach

Combining these two approaches, four major industrial-occupational categories are identified. The shares of US employment in each – creative-in-traded, creative-in-local, routine-in-traded and routine-in-local – are calculated, and a correlation analysis is used to examine the relationship of each to regional economic development indicators.

Findings

Economic growth and development is positively related to employment in the creative-in-traded category. While metros with a higher share of creative-in-traded employment enjoy higher wages and incomes overall, these benefits are not experienced by all worker categories. The share of creative-in-traded employment is also positively and significantly associated with higher inequality. After accounting for higher median housing costs, routine workers in both traded and local industries are found to be relatively worse off in metros with high shares of creative-in-traded employment, on average.

Social implications

This work points to the imperative for the US Government and industry to upgrade routine jobs, which make up the majority of all employment, by increasing the creative content of this work.

Originality/value

The research is among the first to systematically marry the industry and occupational approaches to clusters and economic development.

Details

Competitiveness Review, vol. 25 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1059-5422

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 19 September 2008

Milton Mayfield and Jacqueline Mayfield

The purpose of this paper is to provide a model for how leaders can nurture and develop worker garden variety creativity.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to provide a model for how leaders can nurture and develop worker garden variety creativity.

Design/methodology/approach

This model was created by synthesizing existing research and literature on leadership and garden variety creativity.

Findings

Findings' synthesis yielded a testable and implementable model for improving worker garden creativity through leader interventions.

Originality/value

This paper provides a specific examination of leader potential for garden variety creativity enhancement. This focus is different from most research that examines organizational structure interventions, high‐level creativity, or both.

Details

Journal of Management Development, vol. 27 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0262-1711

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 9 August 2013

Doris Ruth Eikhof and Chris Warhurst

The purpose of this paper is to develop a more comprehensive understanding of why social inequalities and discrimination remain in the creative industries.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to develop a more comprehensive understanding of why social inequalities and discrimination remain in the creative industries.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper synthesizes existing academic and industry research and data, with a particular focus on the creative media industries.

Findings

The paper reveals that existing understanding of the lack of diversity in the creative industries’ workforce is conceptually limited. Better understanding is enabled through an approach centred on the creative industries’ model of production. This approach explains why disadvantage and discrimination are systemic, not transitory.

Practical implications

The findings suggest that current policy assumptions about the creative industries are misguided and need to be reconsidered. The findings also indicate how future research of the creative industries ought to be framed.

Originality/value

The paper provides a novel synthesis of existing research and data to explain how the creative industries’ model of production translates into particular features of work and employment, which then translate into social inequalities that entrench discrimination based on sex, race and class.

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 1999

D. Lynne Persing

As competitive pressures mount, firms are attempting to do more with less – and far more quickly. They are downsizing, using teams, and pushing the time to market. These…

Abstract

As competitive pressures mount, firms are attempting to do more with less – and far more quickly. They are downsizing, using teams, and pushing the time to market. These trends promote polychronic behavior in that they require additional variety in the tasks, activities, and roles that individuals must handle simultaneously. Although evidence suggests that creativity and polychronic preferences are positively related, demands for polychronic behavior appear to be defeating – and resisted – in creative venues such as R&D. This paper addresses this apparent disjunction by focusing on the definition of polychronicity, emphasizing the critical role of agency and the need to count as activities the not particularly visible workings of the mind. The paper proposes, in part, that among creative workers, individual creativity is more related to polychronicity than to monochronicity. Further, volition will play a moderating role in that the relationship between creative performance and either chronicity will be stronger the higher personal agency is in choosing tasks and schedules.

Details

Journal of Managerial Psychology, vol. 14 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-3946

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Article
Publication date: 18 May 2015

Sophie Hennekam

The purpose of this paper is to examine the challenges of older self-employed workers in the creative industries and ways of dealing with these challenges. This is…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the challenges of older self-employed workers in the creative industries and ways of dealing with these challenges. This is important in the light of the aging population and the increase in entrepreneurship among older workers.

Design/methodology/approach

In total, 43 older self-employed creatives in the Netherlands were interviewed by telephone. Once the data were transcribed, content analysis was conducted.

Findings

The findings reveal that older self-employed creatives are often forced into self-employment, experiencing a vicious circle that pushes them away from the creative industries. They have to deal with multiple identities. Successful older self-employed creatives dealt with these challenges by creating synergies between their identities, focussing on their strengths and using their existing networks. They also stressed the transferability of their skills and knowledge.

Research limitations/implications

Older self-employed creatives have to deal with some specific challenges. Although these challenges are difficult to deal with, some successful strategies emerged.

Originality/value

Older self-employed creatives are an under-researched group of workers. Other industries can learn from the success stories of older entrepreneurs in the creative industries.

Details

Management Decision, vol. 53 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 3 July 2017

Andi Burris

The purpose of this paper is to apply a postcolonial perspective on the findings from ethnographic research in a multi-national corporation in Shanghai and shed light on…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to apply a postcolonial perspective on the findings from ethnographic research in a multi-national corporation in Shanghai and shed light on the ways that western creativity narratives are deployed as a means to mobilise and transform workers into self-governing, obedient corporate subjects.

Design/methodology/approach

The research applied ethnographic approaches to understand how creativity narratives are enacted in cross-cultural settings.

Findings

Creativity discourses in China often provoke anxieties around national capacity, economic growth and indigenous innovation. Locally trained knowledge workers in China are often assessed as less creative than their western counterparts and the reason attributed to cultural, pedagogical and political differences. However, these factors are not static in China’s fluid economic landscape and neither do Chinese workers uniformly accept that they are less creative.

Originality/value

This paper sheds light on a previously unexamined aspect of dominant western creativity discourses, which may be useful in future work amongst practitioners in international business settings.

Details

critical perspectives on international business, vol. 13 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1742-2043

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 14 February 2008

Brenda Parker

In the seemingly perpetual battle among cities to secure economic growth, one strategy has gained increasing credence of late: luring the Creative Class. The argument…

Abstract

In the seemingly perpetual battle among cities to secure economic growth, one strategy has gained increasing credence of late: luring the Creative Class. The argument, promulgated by Professor of Economic Development Richard Florida (2002a, pp. 4–5), suggests that human creativity is now the “decisive source of competitive advantage” and cities can thrive by tapping and harnessing such creativity. The primary ingredients in this sweeping recipe for urban success are a group of young, mobile, diverse, ‘creative’ professionals, who constitute a social class of their own, according to Florida's popular book, The Rise of the Creative Class (2002). This Creative Class – if cities can attract and retain it – operates as its own economic machine, producing jobs, enhancing productivity, and increasing the overall well being of the city, Florida argues. From an urban economic development perspective, the role of the city is to create the conditions in which this Creative Class and associated industries can flourish.

Details

Gender in an Urban World
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-7623-1477-5

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