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Book part
Publication date: 15 December 2016

Eric D. M. Johnson

This chapter explores the recent trend in libraries: that of the establishment of spaces specifically set aside for creative work. The rise of these dedicated creative

Abstract

Purpose

This chapter explores the recent trend in libraries: that of the establishment of spaces specifically set aside for creative work. The rise of these dedicated creative spaces is owed to a confluence of factors that happen to be finding their expression together in recent years. This chapter examines the history of these spaces and explores the factors that gave rise to them and will fuel them moving forward.

Methodology/approach

A viewpoint piece, this chapter combines historical research and historical/comparative analyses to examine the ways by which libraries have supported creative work in the past and how they may continue to do so into the 21st century.

Findings

The key threads brought together include a societal recognition of the value of creativity and related skills and attributes; the philosophies, values, and missions of libraries in both their long-standing forms and in recent evolutions; the rise of participatory culture as a result of inexpensive technologies; improved means to build community and share results of efforts; and library experience and historical practice in matters related to creativity. The chapter concludes with advice for those interested in the establishment of such spaces, grounding those reflections in the author’s experiences in developing a new creative space at Virginia Commonwealth University.

Originality/value

While a number of pieces have been written that discuss the practicalities of developing certain kinds of creative spaces, very little has been written that situates these spaces in larger social and library professional contexts; this chapter begins to fill that gap.

Details

The Future of Library Space
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-270-5

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Article
Publication date: 6 March 2017

Darius Pacauskas and Risto Rajala

Information technology has been recognized as one of the keys to improved productivity in organizations. Yet, existing research has not paid sufficient attention to how…

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1182

Abstract

Purpose

Information technology has been recognized as one of the keys to improved productivity in organizations. Yet, existing research has not paid sufficient attention to how information systems (ISs) influence the creative performance of individual users. The paper aims to discuss this issue.

Design/methodology/approach

This study draws on the theories of flow and cognitive load to establish a model of the predicted influences. The authors hypothesize that the information technology supports creativity by engaging individuals in a creative process and by lowering their cognitive load related to the process. To test these hypotheses, the authors employ a meta-analytical structural equation modeling approach using 24 previous studies on creativity and ISs use.

Findings

The results suggest that factors that help the user to maintain an interest in the performed task, immerse the user in a state of flow, and lower a person’s cognitive load during IS use can affect the user’s creative performance.

Research limitations/implications

The findings imply that a combination of the theories of flow and cognitive load complements the understanding of how ISs influence creativity.

Originality/value

This paper proposes an explanation on why ISs affect creativity, which can be used by scholars to position further research, and by practitioners to implement creativity support systems.

Details

Information Technology & People, vol. 30 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-3845

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Article
Publication date: 23 October 2020

Jonas Fernando Petry, Antônio Giovanni Figliuolo Uchôa, Maurício Brilhante de Mendonça, Karinny de Lima Magalhães and Rafaella Marlene Barbosa Benchimol

The purpose of this paper is to draw on concepts from the creative economy literature to present a proposal for conceptualizing the creative industries from the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to draw on concepts from the creative economy literature to present a proposal for conceptualizing the creative industries from the perspective of the ideas underlying the concepts of industrial districts and the triple helix. The analysis lays out the foundations with a review of the literature on the creative economy and builds upon them with the terminology of creative industries and industrial districts.

Design/methodology/approach

The analysis lays out the foundations with a review of the literature on the creative economy and builds upon them with the terminology of creative industries and industrial districts. A three-dimensional representation is developed, from a perspective in which the three dimensions comprise university, creative industries and government, combined with seven underlying factors that define the archetypal framework from the perspective of the creative economy of the region's handcrafts.

Findings

Working from the principal of an analysis of underlying factors, the paper presents an ethnographic study of the potentials and obstacles present in the handcrafts sector and delineates the work that remains to be done to enable construction of a creative economy.

Originality/value

A prominent possibility based on the ethnographic study of the potentials listed, the creative economy of the handicraft sector is underexplored in the Amazon. Based on the Amazon heritage of the people in the Alto Solimões region, future prospects such as establishment of guilds, clusters and internationalization of production in a tourism association represent sui generis potentials for the economic development of the Alto Solimões region of the Brazilian Amazon.

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International Journal of Social Economics, vol. 47 no. 12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0306-8293

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Article
Publication date: 4 June 2010

Christèle Boulaire, Guillaume Hervet and Raoul Graf

The purpose of this paper is to analyse how individual creativity of internet users is expressed in the production of online music videos and how the creative dynamic…

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2309

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to analyse how individual creativity of internet users is expressed in the production of online music videos and how the creative dynamic among amateur internet video producers can be characterized.

Design/methodology/approach

The researchers became readers and authors in the aim of providing the academic community with a scholarly narrative of creative YouTube video production. To develop their narrative, they explored the narrative woods that have grown up on the other side of the monitor screen in the form of videos inspired by one song.

Findings

The collective creative force is shown not to be expressed merely through the semantic and non‐semantic montages that make internet users into postmodern tinkerers, but also through such mechanisms as imitation, diversification and ornamentation. This force and these mechanisms give rise to chains that link and connect individual minds, imaginations, interests, enthusiasms, talents, abilities and skills.

Practical implications

As part of a relationship, or even a “conversation” to be initiated, sustained, and maintained on behalf of an industry organization, or brand with its consumers, the authors believe that the way to deal with digital participatory culture and the creative force manifested in innovation communities is to capitalize on these creative chains as judiciously as possible.

Originality/value

The authors suggest that this process should be part of a high‐impact interactive marketing strategy likely to promote (self‐) enchantment and foster loyalty among community members through (self‐) enchantment, particularly via the coproduction of a story, with community members creating the scripts.

Details

Journal of Research in Interactive Marketing, vol. 4 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-7122

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Article
Publication date: 27 April 2012

Kate Holmes, Rachel McLean and Gill Green

The purpose of this paper is to gain a deeper understanding of how independent craftspeople adopt and use social media (SM) in order to promote their creative enterprise…

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790

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to gain a deeper understanding of how independent craftspeople adopt and use social media (SM) in order to promote their creative enterprise. However, some of these opportunities may place a demand for specific knowledge, business and technical skills on untrained artists. The purpose of this paper is to look into this emerging phenomena, the challenges and opportunities it presents and to propose solutions or recommendations to independent artists, training organisations, and government bodies who may wish to promote the creative industries.

Design/methodology/approach

In order to identify different modes of adoption of SM and some of the related challenges within this domain, interviews were conducted with independent craftspeople in order to explore these topics and identify emergent themes. The research focuses on an ethnographic study through an interpretive lens; Habermas' theory of communicative action is drawn on to explore the adoption and use of technology by craftspeople to promote their work and business.

Findings

The paper identifies some of the most current challenges for the independent craftsperson in adopting SM to promote and sell products. While participants are aware of benefits of SM technologies, lack of time, lack of technical knowledge and unfamiliarity with new media technologies are all highlighted as barriers to adoption. Proposed recommendations include training and support offered by government development agencies, and cooperatives employing social media experts.

Research limitations/implications

Situated within the context of an ongoing ethnographic study, this study was a specific episode carried out at a craft fair to investigate the specific theme of SM adoption for product promotion. Given more time further interviews could be carried out to include a greater range of participants. Craftspeople who work entirely out of a workshop and do not attend events such as craft fairs could be interviewed to give further insight. A future study will present an analysis of the content of web sites, third party portals and social media posts to understand the interactions that take place through web technologies and social media.

Originality/value

The findings of this paper can be used in shaping support solutions for independent craftspeople wishing to adopt SM as a method of promoting their product or craft. The discovered challenges may be used to identify potential problems of the Internet and SM for the independent craftsperson. Findings can also be used to inform hosts of e‐commerce sites for independent artists, they may also be used to inform government and funding bodies.

Details

Journal of Systems and Information Technology, vol. 14 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1328-7265

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Article
Publication date: 4 December 2017

Elham Lafzi Ghazi and Miguel Goede

The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the case of Kish, which is a small island off the coast of Iran, using the creative indicators of a creative economy.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the case of Kish, which is a small island off the coast of Iran, using the creative indicators of a creative economy.

Design/methodology/approach

Based on the extant literature, a set of performance measures and factors are identified for the creative economy. This set is mainly based on Florida’s theory on the creative class. The case of Kish Island is evaluated based on these indicators, and after analysis, conclusions are drawn.

Findings

Kish Island, with its numerous tourist attractions, shows remarkable creative industries that highlight the presence of the creative class and the development of a creative economy in this area.

Originality/value

The paper illustrates the model of a creative economy assessment for the small Kish Island and finally provides a good understanding of the concept of the creative economy as a key element of the creative city.

Details

International Journal of Social Economics, vol. 44 no. 12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0306-8293

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Article
Publication date: 6 July 2020

Robyn Owen and Marcus O'Dair

This paper aims to examine how blockchain technology is disrupting business models for new venture finance.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examine how blockchain technology is disrupting business models for new venture finance.

Design/methodology/approach

The role of blockchain technology in the evolution of new business models to monetize the creative economy is explored by means of a case study approach. The focus is on the recorded music industry, which is in the vanguard of new forms of intermediation and financialization. There is a particular focus on emerging artists.

Findings

This paper provides novel case study insights and concludes by considering how further research can contribute to building a theory of technology-driven business models which apply to the development, on the one hand, of new forms of financial intermediaries, more correctly referred to as “infomediaries,” and on the other hand, to new forms of direct monetization by artists.

Originality/value

This paper provides early insight into the emerging potential applications of blockchain technologies to streamline music industry business service models and improve finance streams for new artists. The findings have far-reaching implications across the creative sector.

Details

The Journal of Risk Finance, vol. 21 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1526-5943

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Article
Publication date: 1 July 2001

Thomas Tan Tsu Wee

Many large companies in Asia are turning to market intelligence for input into their strategic management system and decision making. Conventional marketing research is…

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6893

Abstract

Many large companies in Asia are turning to market intelligence for input into their strategic management system and decision making. Conventional marketing research is increasingly viewed as being too narrowly focused on tactical and operational issues. It is characterized by an overriding concern with data rather than analysed information and the research is often conducted in response to an apparent market threat or opportunity rather than on an ongoing basis. This paper attempts to highlight the role of the Internet for market intelligence purposes. It proposes and demonstrates the marketing intelligence process, techniques and procedures, as illustrated by a case study on Creative Technology. Believes that the intelligent use of the Internet is strategically beneficial for both marketing research and intelligence.

Details

Marketing Intelligence & Planning, vol. 19 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-4503

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Article
Publication date: 19 August 2010

Si Zhang and Robert Pearce

The paper investigates the importance of six sources of technology as used by MNE subsidiaries operating in China. These are determined by the strategic roles of the…

Abstract

The paper investigates the importance of six sources of technology as used by MNE subsidiaries operating in China. These are determined by the strategic roles of the subsidiaries. This facilitates analysis of the role of technology both in the competitive development of the subsidiaries and Chinese industrialization. Though these subsidiaries build their bridgeheads in China (mainly to supply the Chinese market) around established, standardized parent‐group technology, there is a tendency to broaden technological scope (mostly locally accessed or generated), especially to generate the capability to develop new goods that target the Chinese market.

Details

Multinational Business Review, vol. 18 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1525-383X

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Article
Publication date: 4 May 2010

Anton Kriz

China has become an economic powerhouse in historic terms but there are a number of challenges to its continued prosperity. The aim of this paper is to more fully…

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1710

Abstract

Purpose

China has become an economic powerhouse in historic terms but there are a number of challenges to its continued prosperity. The aim of this paper is to more fully understand China's propensity for creative innovation, which is seen as an important next stage in its continued development.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper is conceptual but uses historical and secondary data to support its assumptions. The paper was written in conjunction with the 1st Global Peter F. Drucker Forum (celebrating 100 years since his birth) and attempts to continue his challenge of “the hard work of thinking”.

Findings

China has a long history of successful innovation. However, Confucian belief, a single despot and a closing off to the rest of the world have thwarted its innovative edge. The key to rekindling the entrepreneurial spirit is seen largely as an internal battle based on the state's ability to balance the institution of government with the needs of a burgeoning prospective creative class. This paper identifies that much of this change will rely on quality‐related developments rather than simply investments of financial capital.

Originality/value

The ability to create new things is a challenge to developing economies that rely on low cost and imitation. China's success in innovation will have substantial implications for developed nations both economically and geo‐politically. China wants to be a significant player on a global scale and this paper sheds light on its potential to achieve such an objective. Through traversing China's innovative landscape, this paper also enlightens the field of management on key aspects of China's innovative past, present and future.

Details

Management Decision, vol. 48 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

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