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Book part
Publication date: 9 November 2009

Eric F. Rietzschel, Carsten K.W. De Dreu and Bernard A. Nijstad

Psychologists have created highly specific and elaborate models of the creative process and the variables affecting creative performance. Unfortunately, much of this…

Abstract

Psychologists have created highly specific and elaborate models of the creative process and the variables affecting creative performance. Unfortunately, much of this research has tended to take either an overanalytical or an underanalytical approach. By overanalytical we mean that researchers have studied single, isolated stages of group creativity, such as idea generation. By underanalytical we mean that researchers have tended to treat “creative group performance” as a single, unitary construct. However, we argue that it would be better to approach creativity as a multidimensional sequence of behaviors. In support of this argument, we discuss research on individual as well as group creativity showing that, firstly, there are multiple routes toward creative performance (e.g., flexibility and persistence), which may be pursued alone or in combination. It is likely that these different routes are subject to distinct influences. Secondly, we argue and show that different stages of the creative process (problem finding, idea generation, idea selection, idea implementation) are not necessarily affected by the same variables, or in the same way. We highlight some new questions for research, and discuss implications for the management of groups and teams.

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Creativity in Groups
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-583-3

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Article
Publication date: 18 May 2015

Saskia de Klerk

The idea of “creating something from nothing” resonates strongly with the creation process associated with artists. The Levi-Strauss and Baker and Nelson discussions also…

Abstract

Purpose

The idea of “creating something from nothing” resonates strongly with the creation process associated with artists. The Levi-Strauss and Baker and Nelson discussions also refer to entrepreneurial bricolage as something that entails a “make do with what is at hand”. The purpose of this paper is to investigate how artists utilise bricolage to create projects and develop their skills. Little is known of their perceptions of entrepreneurial behaviour and bricolage, and how they construct these bricolage networks. The tension between sharing, creating and to maintain a personal brand is negotiated by leveraging these bricolage relationships.

Design/methodology/approach

In-depth interviews with artists that actively make a living from their involvement in the creative industries were conducted. This provided insight into their perceptions on networking and bricolage. Since networking is such an individual and interchangeable process the interviews allowed the author to unravel these complexities of the relationships.

Findings

The findings produced two themes. The first, demonstrated the entrepreneurial behaviour of these artists and their unique contributions. The second theme involved the bricolage relationships formed to overcome resource constraints. The collaborative nature highlighted the co-creation relationships that are strategically formed to provide long-term opportunities and sustained working relationships.

Research limitations/implications

This study contributes to literature on bricolage, management, creative industries and entrepreneurship in non-traditional settings.

Practical implications

This study contributes to theory on bricolage and entrepreneurial behaviour in small enterprises and creative industries. Artists can benefit from the knowledge to build strategic networks to secure future work.

Social implications

Educators can use this information to prepare aspiring artists to create more independent and/or interdependent entrepreneurial projects.

Originality/value

This work encourages further cross-disciplinary research on the arts, entrepreneurship, networking and small business studies.

Details

Management Decision, vol. 53 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

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Abstract

Details

Frontiers of Creative Industries: Exploring Structural and Categorical Dynamics
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78743-773-9

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 1995

Thomas N. Garavan and Joe Deegan

Considers the availability of objective criteria for creativityenhancement from relevant applied research. Uses research to address theproblem of creativity within the…

Abstract

Considers the availability of objective criteria for creativity enhancement from relevant applied research. Uses research to address the problem of creativity within the framework of artificial intelligence. Compares thinking to using a map and discusses creativity in terms of making our own maps rather than just following existing maps. Suggests that creativity includes the individual′s mastering of existing rules, enabling him or her to see when these rules might be broken. It thus follows that basic heuristic competences underlie the creative act. A strategy for stimulating creativity should include a more systematic basis for the development of creative resources, in the concept of heuristic competence.

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Industrial and Commercial Training, vol. 27 no. 11
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0019-7858

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 2000

Elspeth McFadzean

Innovation is a necessary function of organisations today. In order to develop innovative products, services and procedures, managers must encourage and promote creative

Abstract

Innovation is a necessary function of organisations today. In order to develop innovative products, services and procedures, managers must encourage and promote creative thinking within their organisation. Everyone can be creative but there are some people who have a naturally creative flair. This paper examines some of the behaviour and creative processes that these people undertake in order to develop imaginative and novel ideas. Specifically, the paper describes some of the thoughts, ideas and behaviours of Brian Eno, a rock musician in the 1970s, and compares them with some of the other great creative minds of the past such as George Bernard Shaw and Michael Faraday. The paper concludes with some lessons that have been drawn from exploring the minds of these people and recommends that managers should nurture creativity with their organisation.

Details

Management Decision, vol. 38 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

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Article
Publication date: 13 February 2017

Helen N. Rothberg and G. Scott Erickson

This paper aims to bring together the existing theory from knowledge management (KM), competitive intelligence (CI) and big data analytics to develop a more comprehensive…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to bring together the existing theory from knowledge management (KM), competitive intelligence (CI) and big data analytics to develop a more comprehensive view of the full range of intangible assets (data, information, knowledge and intelligence). By doing so, the interactions of the intangibles are better understood and recommendations can be made for the appropriate structure of big data systems in different circumstances. Metrics are also applied to illustrate how one can identify and understand what these different circumstances might look like.

Design/methodology/approach

The approach is chiefly conceptual, combining theory from multiple disciplines enhanced with practical applications. Illustrative data drawn from other empirical work are applied to illustrate some concepts.

Findings

Theory suggests that the KM theory is particularly useful in guiding big data system installations that focus primarily on the transfer of data/information. For big data systems focused on analytical insights, the CI theory might be a better match, as the system structures are actually quite similar.

Practical implications

Though the guidelines are general, practitioners should be able to evaluate their own situations and perhaps make better decisions about the direction of their big data systems. One can make the case that all the disciplines have something to add to improving how intangibles are deployed and applied and that improving coordination between KM and analytics/intelligence functions will help all intangibles systems to work more effectively.

Originality/value

To the authors’ knowledge, very few scholars work in this area, at the intersection of multiple types of intangible assets. The metrics are unique, especially in their scale and attachment to theory, allowing insights that provide more clarity to scholars and practical direction to industry.

Details

Journal of Knowledge Management, vol. 21 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1367-3270

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Book part
Publication date: 23 September 2016

Aparna Katre

Social entrepreneurs who use market mechanisms to solve wicked problems (Rittel & Webber, 1973) may benefit from practices based on design thinking. Design thinking offers…

Abstract

Social entrepreneurs who use market mechanisms to solve wicked problems (Rittel & Webber, 1973) may benefit from practices based on design thinking. Design thinking offers approaches to work iteratively on both problem and solution spaces collaboratively with multiple diverse stakeholders, which is characteristic of innovating for social change. This research conceptualizes designing as a construct formed by three practices: making improvements, generating creative leaps, and problem-solving. Using Boland and Collopy’s (2004) conception of a sense-making manager, it proposes “how” nascent social entrepreneurs take actions and also proposes “what” specific activities they undertake for the development of the venture. A conceptual model proposing “what” it is that social entrepreneurs do and “how” they go about their activities affecting new venture development is tested using structural equation modeling. Preliminary support for the predictive capability of the model is encouraging, suggesting that practices based on design thinking may be further developed in order to advance theoretical understanding of the application of design thinking for social entrepreneurship.

Details

Models of Start-up Thinking and Action: Theoretical, Empirical and Pedagogical Approaches
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-485-3

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2003

Keith Crosier and David Pickton

Account planning as a discipline has been somewhat obscured from academic view. In practice, it has played a significant role in the development of the marketing…

Abstract

Account planning as a discipline has been somewhat obscured from academic view. In practice, it has played a significant role in the development of the marketing communications (especially, advertising) industry although it has been adopted in varying forms and with differing emphases. It has been misunderstood by many. This paper offers a summary of the insights gained from the papers contained in this special issue of Marketing Intelligence & Planning; papers that represent many years of experience in the field; papers that are a mix of academic and practitioner perspectives. Collectively, they describe this faintly mysterious discipline more completely than any other published source of which we know. What is clear from the papers is the absence of any agreed succinct description or definition of what account planning should be in the current and anticipated future marketing communications environment. This paper attempts to remedy this situation by proposing a definition of account planning derived from this collective work which others may wish to accept, develop, repudiate or (best of all) debate.

Details

Marketing Intelligence & Planning, vol. 21 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-4503

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Article
Publication date: 2 May 2017

David Rae

The purpose of this paper is to explore the roles of peripherality and centrality in relation to entrepreneurial learning and development. Peripherality has previously…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the roles of peripherality and centrality in relation to entrepreneurial learning and development. Peripherality has previously been considered from a mainly geographical perspective as being remote, loosely connected and marginal. A broader conception of the topic is addressed, asking: in what ways is peripherality relevant to entrepreneurial learning? How can centre-peripheral connectivity enhance this? What are the implications for communities, learners and educators?

Design/methodology/approach

Discourses of entrepreneurship development relating to policy, economics, geography and culture favour the concept of centres, which attract attention, resources, activities and people. Whilst peripherality is an enduring topic of interest in regional studies, it is widened through using the conceptualisation of legitimate peripheral participation in social learning as a methodological lens for the study. A case study of the technology sector in Cape Breton, Canada is included to illustrate peripheral entrepreneurship.

Findings

The paper suggests ways in which peripheral-central relationships can be a positive factor in entrepreneurial learning. It suggests that rebalancing the bidirectional “flow” of knowledge, talent and resources between centres and peripheries can enhance the value of peripheral entrepreneurship, learning and innovation.

Social implications

The paper connects with prior work on community economic development, offering observations for entrepreneurial learning and development of knowledge-intensive businesses in peripheral areas. Boundary-spanning leadership and skills are required to facilitate peripheral-central interaction and entrepreneurship.

Originality/value

Peripherality is defined more widely than in prior work, suggesting peripheral learning is part of the fundamental human experience and offers new insights, innovations and opportunities which can create shared value. A conceptual framework for peripheral-central entrepreneurial learning is proposed, which may assist in rebalancing central-peripheral value creation, innovation and regeneration.

Details

International Journal of Entrepreneurial Behavior & Research, vol. 23 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-2554

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2003

Chris Hackley

In commercial applications the somewhat passive notion of marketing research is increasingly being superseded by the more active idea of consumer insight. In advertising…

Abstract

In commercial applications the somewhat passive notion of marketing research is increasingly being superseded by the more active idea of consumer insight. In advertising this subtle change of emphasis is captured in the evolution of the account planning role and the associated “philosophy” of creative advertising development. The account planner is ostensibly responsible not only for commissioning and/or conducting advertising and consumer research, she or he is also responsible for integrating the resulting consumer insights into the creative advertising development process. Account planners deploy their consumer insights to act as “midwives” to creativity in the sense that they are responsible for persuading creative staff to take research‐derived consumer insights on board. This paper draws on recent depth interviews with advertising professionals and previously published research to explore the process of integrating research‐based insights into creative advertising development. The overall aim is to further elaborate the tasks and effectiveness of the account planner.

Details

Marketing Intelligence & Planning, vol. 21 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-4503

Keywords

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