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Book part
Publication date: 14 September 2020

Virginia Munro

A full and adequate Systematic Quantitative Literature Research Analysis of the academic literature and research on creating shared value (CSV) is long overdue. This…

Abstract

A full and adequate Systematic Quantitative Literature Research Analysis of the academic literature and research on creating shared value (CSV) is long overdue. This chapter commences this process by introducing some of the academic literature currently on CSV and examining the strengths and weaknesses of this literature, while identifying gaps for future research. The chapter builds on current academic literature to include writing and research from the business community in an attempt to make this chapter both topical and accessible to anyone interested in CSV, including practitioners interested in implementing these types of projects as direct CSV projects or as part of already existing CSR strategy. It is expected that the inclusion of this type of business literature will add value to academic research going forward. The Appendix brings the chapter together by presenting examples of a variety of CSV case studies to provide ideas for future project implementation and opportunities for future research in both implementation and measurement.

Details

CSR for Purpose, Shared Value and Deep Transformation
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80043-035-8

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2020

Fernando G. Alberti and Federica Belfanti

This paper aims to contribute to the debate about creating shared value (CSV) and clusters, by shedding light on how clusters might generate shared value, i.e. cause…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to contribute to the debate about creating shared value (CSV) and clusters, by shedding light on how clusters might generate shared value, i.e. cause social and business benefits, hence focusing on the following research question “do clusters create shared value?”

Design/methodology/approach

The study relied on social network analysis methods and techniques. Data have been collected from both primary and secondary sources, in the empirical context of the Motor Valley cluster in Emilia-Romagna. The authors computed three independent and four dependent variables to operationalize the concept of cluster development and shared value creation. A multiple regression quadratic assignment procedure and, more specifically, the most accurate model of that procedure, that is the double semi-partialling method, has been carried out to answer the research question. Finally, empirical evidence has been complemented with other cluster-level data recently collected by the Italian Cluster Mapping project.

Findings

The findings confirm how the development of the Motor Valley cluster in Emilia-Romagna contributed to the creation of economic and social growth opportunities for all the actors. The study shows that clusters do create shared value and the chosen cluster development variables do explain much of the business and social impact variables at a very high statistical significance level.

Originality/value

The paper contributes to the under-explored research on clusters and CSV with a very first attempt in providing quantitative evidence of the phenomenon.

Details

Competitiveness Review: An International Business Journal , vol. 31 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1059-5422

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Article
Publication date: 6 September 2018

Keith James Kelley, Thomas A. Hemphill and Yannick Thams

This paper aims to explore the relationship between corporate social responsibility (CSR) and corporate financial performance (CFP) from a shared value perspective…

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2112

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to explore the relationship between corporate social responsibility (CSR) and corporate financial performance (CFP) from a shared value perspective. Adopting reputation as a multilevel form of value that mediates the CSR–CFP relationship, the paper explains how CSR initiatives may enhance both firm and country reputation and how the amount of shared value between the two leads to CFP.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper first establishes the theoretical foundation for the relationship between CSR and CFP. It then draws connections to a more recent stream of literature surrounding the concept of creating shared value to expand upon this relationship, adopting reputation as a multilevel form of shared value that mediates the CSR–CFP relationship. The paper further discusses moderating influences of this relationship that may vary contextually with emerging economies such as those in Latin America.

Findings

The paper argues that as markets become further developed, CSR initiatives will create a higher proportion of shared reputational value between a corporation and country. This is the result of from aligning CSR initiatives that benefit a society, with the strategic goals of the firm – the essence of creating of shared value – but is more difficult in emerging markets, especially volatile ones.

Originality/value

This paper offers insight into a complex relationship between CSR, shared reputational value and CFP by introducing the more recent concept of creating shared value. Several propositions related to this general relationship, and some related to the difference among emerging markets (such as those in Latin America), address the need for more research related to corporate and country reputation, creating shared value and in the emerging market context.

Details

Multinational Business Review, vol. 27 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1525-383X

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Book part
Publication date: 16 July 2019

Keith James Kelley and Yannick Thams

In this chapter, we explore the multilevel nature of reputation from a shared value perspective. Building on a large body of literature surrounding corporate reputation…

Abstract

In this chapter, we explore the multilevel nature of reputation from a shared value perspective. Building on a large body of literature surrounding corporate reputation, we discuss how the creation of reputational value at the firm level may also lead to value shared by the industries and countries in which a firm operates, and vice versa. In examining the recursive and dynamic relationships, strategic implications emerge with regard to managing reputations globally. We argue that the value of reputation is determined by the ability to meet the expectations of stakeholders with respect to what they as an audience perceive as important. Stakeholders’ expectations and perceptions of what is valuable fluctuate across different markets and the more heterogeneous the markets in which a firm diversifies internationally, the more difficult it will be to manage all these expectations. By building on our understanding of firm, industry, and country reputation, and the recursive relationships between them, we contend that creating shared value (CSV), as part of the global reputation management process (GRM), is likely to be easier when there is contextual similarity and limited product diversification. Building on previous frameworks, and employing signaling theory, we create a simplified model of GRM that highlights CSV in the form of multilevel reputation. Distinctions are drawn between being efficient and effective as part of the GRM process and a corresponding typology is created. The chapter concludes with a discussion of strategic implications, alongside a few recommendations, and possible directions for future research.

Details

Global Aspects of Reputation and Strategic Management
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78754-314-0

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Article
Publication date: 12 September 2020

Sushil S. Chaurasia, Natashaa Kaul, Babita Yadav and Dhirendra Shukla

This paper aims to identify the prominent themes of open innovation for sustainability (OIS) and establish their inter-relationships. Moreover, it examines the importance…

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1276

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to identify the prominent themes of open innovation for sustainability (OIS) and establish their inter-relationships. Moreover, it examines the importance of success factors (i.e. knowledge management system, openness and organizational structure) and their configuration for co-creating shared value for OIS in manufacturing micro small and medium enterprises.

Design/methodology/approach

The first stage of investigation determines the relationship between concepts using the bibliometric technique. The second stage examines predictors (e.g. knowledge management system, openness and organizational structure) that contribute to the desired outcomes (creation of shared value in OIS) through necessary condition analysis.

Findings

The investigation demonstrates that all three conditions are necessary for (at different levels) creating shared values for OIS. More specifically, the investigation shows that the different levels of creation of shared value outcomes do require organizations to configure organizational interventions at different levels of the knowledge management system, openness and organizational structure.

Practical implications

To use the concept of open innovation (OI), organizations need to expand their view beyond their existing resource pool and business environment, to include their partners and stakeholders for more inclusivity. Such creation of shared value for OI does require active participation, interaction and collaboration with both manufacturer, retailers and other stakeholders, for developing an insight in creating value for sustainability problem-solving context.

Originality/value

The investigation advances the existing body of knowledge that propagates the significance of knowledge management system, openness and organizational structure as the antecedent to increase the creation of shared value for sustainability by organizations. The investigation advances the existing body of knowledge that propagates the significance of knowledge management system, openness and organizational structure as an antecedent to increase the creation of shared value for sustainability by organizations.

Details

Journal of Knowledge Management, vol. 24 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1367-3270

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Book part
Publication date: 13 August 2014

Paul C. van Fenema, Bianca Keers and Henk Zijm

Sharing services increasingly extends beyond intraorganizational concentration of service delivery. Organizations have started to promote cooperation across their…

Abstract

Purpose

Sharing services increasingly extends beyond intraorganizational concentration of service delivery. Organizations have started to promote cooperation across their boundaries to deal with strategic tensions in their value ecosystem, moving beyond traditional outsourcing. This chapter addresses two research questions geared to the challenge of interorganizational shared services (ISS): why would organizations want to get and remain involved in ISS? And: what are the implications of ISS for (inter)organizational value creation?

Design/methodology/approach

The conceptual chapter reviews literature pertaining to ISS from public, commercial, and nongovernmental sectors. ISS is understood as a multistakeholder organizational innovation. In order to analyze ISS and conduct empirical research, we developed a taxonomy and research framework.

Findings

The chapter shows how ISS can be positioned in value chains, distinguishing vertical, horizontal, and hybrid ISS. It outlines ISS implications for developing business models, structures, and relationships. Success factors and barriers are presented that epitomize the dynamic interplay of organizational autonomy and interorganizational dependence.

Research limitations/implications

The research framework offers conceptual ideas for theoretical and empirical work. Researchers involved in ISS studies may adopt strategic, strategic innovation, and organizational innovation perspectives.

Practical implications

ISS phases are distinguished to focus innovation management — initiation, enactment, and evaluation. Furthermore, insights are provided into processes and interventions aimed at making ISS a success for participating organizations.

Originality/value

Cross-sectoral perspective on ISS; taxonomy of ISS; research framework built on organization and strategic management literature.

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Article
Publication date: 21 January 2019

Jooho Lee

This paper aims to move beyond the limits of creating shared value (CSV) by presenting a norms-driven framework for creating shared value.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to move beyond the limits of creating shared value (CSV) by presenting a norms-driven framework for creating shared value.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper combines insights from organizational studies and philosophy to critique CSV and to articulate an alternative model for integrating the pursuit of profit with social needs and demands.

Findings

CSV poses significant challenges for managers due to the problem of bounded rationality. Rather than merely engaging in a logic of consequence, this paper argues that managers should integrate norms-based reasoning within the cognitive process of strategic management.

Originality/value

This paper critiques an existing framework for creating shared value and proposes a new framework.

Details

Competitiveness Review: An International Business Journal , vol. 29 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1059-5422

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Article
Publication date: 3 August 2012

Heiko Spitzeck and Sonia Chapman

This paper aims to create empirical evidence regarding shared value strategies recently propagated by Michael Porter and Mark Kramer.

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6469

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to create empirical evidence regarding shared value strategies recently propagated by Michael Porter and Mark Kramer.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors analyze a single case study of a collaboration between BASF, André Maggi Group and Fundação Espaço Eco in Brazil. The objective is to evaluate whether the applied strategy can be considered as a case of shared value creation.

Findings

The case study on the collaboration between BASF, FEE and the André Maggi Group does qualify as a shared value strategy, more precisely as a case of redesigning productivity in the value chain.

Research limitations/applications

This single case study creates some evidence for shared value strategies; however, more research is needed to generalize the results.

Practical implications

The socio‐eco‐efficiency analysis offered by Fundação Espaço Eco creates a differentiation strategy for BASF in Brazil. The work enables BASF's clients to reduce negative impacts while increasing their financial, social and environmental performance.

Originality/value

This paper is the first empirical verification of the shared value concept. It demonstrates that shared value strategies do enhance financial as well as socio‐environmental performance and build stronger client relationships.

Details

Corporate Governance: The international journal of business in society, vol. 12 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1472-0701

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Article
Publication date: 18 May 2012

Michael Pirson

The financial crisis of 2007/2008 has caused many to question the basic premises of the current business system. Porter and Kramer suggest that the purpose of the…

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2488

Abstract

Purpose

The financial crisis of 2007/2008 has caused many to question the basic premises of the current business system. Porter and Kramer suggest that the purpose of the corporation needs to be redefined. They posit that the corporation, rather than merely pursuing financial value creation set out to pursue shared value creation. They further declare social entrepreneurs the paragons of said sharedvalue creation. The purpose of this paper is to explore that claim.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper critically analyzes the pathway of sharedvalue creation in three leading social enterprises employing a genealogical perspective.

Findings

It is found that very innovative sharedvalue creating ventures opted out of balance‐oriented, sharedvalue creation strategies and embraced either financial or social‐value primacy strategies over time. The findings thus question the power of the sharedvalue creation notion when viewed as balance orientation.

Originality/value

The paper presents a new concept, a new methodology, and interesting case studies.

Details

Social Enterprise Journal, vol. 8 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-8614

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Article
Publication date: 19 March 2020

Emma Harriet Wood and Maarit Kinnunen

This study aims to explore how emotionally rich collective experiences create lasting, shareable memories, which influence future behaviours. In particular, the role of…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to explore how emotionally rich collective experiences create lasting, shareable memories, which influence future behaviours. In particular, the role of others and of music in creating value through memories is considered using the concept of socially extended emotions.

Design/methodology/approach

Over 250 narratives were gathered from festival attendees in the UK and Finland. Respondents completed a writing task detailing their most vivid memories, what made them memorable, their feelings at the time and as they remembered them, and how they shared them. The narratives were then analysed thematically.

Findings

Collective emotion continues to be co-created long after the experience through memory-sharing. The music listened to is woven through this extension of the experience but is, surprisingly, not a critical part of it. The sociality of the experience is remembered most and was key to the memories shared afterwards. The added value of gathering memorable moments, and being able to share them with others, is clearly evidenced.

Practical implications

The study highlights the importance of designing events to create collective emotional moments that form lasting memories. This emphasizes the role of post-experience marketing and customer relationship building to enhance the value that is created customer-to-customer via memory sharing.

Originality/value

The research addresses the lack of literature exploring post-event experience journeys and the collective nature of these. It also deepens a theoretical understanding of the role of time and sociality in the co-creation and extension of emotions and their value in hospitality consumption. A model is proposed to guide future research.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 32 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

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