Search results

1 – 10 of over 2000
Article
Publication date: 3 May 2019

Lee Fergusson, Luke Van Der Laan, Craig White and June Balfour

The purpose of this paper is to explore the work-based learning (WBL) ethos of a professional studies doctoral program, a higher degree by research program implemented in…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the work-based learning (WBL) ethos of a professional studies doctoral program, a higher degree by research program implemented in Australia.

Design/methodology/approach

This is a preliminary case study of one higher degree by research program and two doctoral candidates participating in the program to explore the ethos and outcomes of the program.

Findings

The program has sought to develop a different type of higher education ethos, one characterized by an open-door communications policy, a critical friend philosophy, an emphasis on teamwork, pro tem supervision and a new model for doctoral supervision, self-designed work-based projects, self-directed research programs and the development of professional identity.

Originality/value

The characteristics and contributions of WBL programs at the doctoral level have been well documented in the academic literature, but the unique ethos, if there is one, of such programs has yet to be fully examined. This study goes some of the way to answering the question of whether such programs have a unique ethos and if so what are its features and how might it contribute to student development.

Details

Higher Education, Skills and Work-Based Learning, vol. 9 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-3896

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 17 December 2021

Florence Lui and Deidre M. Anglin

Ethnoracial minorities report a variety of discriminatory experiences due to systemic racism. Yet, few studies have examined whether gender and race/ethnicity interact to predict…

Abstract

Purpose

Ethnoracial minorities report a variety of discriminatory experiences due to systemic racism. Yet, few studies have examined whether gender and race/ethnicity interact to predict institutional discrimination and racial microaggressions through an intersectional approach.

Design/methodology/approach

A predominantly female (60%), ethnoracial minority (20.8% Black, 31.6% Asian, 30.8% Latina/o, 8.2% White, 6.6% Middle Eastern) sample of 895 undergraduates attending a minority-serving public university in an urban setting completed self-report measures of sociodemographic characteristics, experiences of racial microaggressions and institutional discrimination.

Findings

Significant (p < 0.05) gender × race/ethnicity interaction effects were found in several institutional discrimination domains: Males reported more police/court discrimination overall, but gender differences in police/court discrimination were less pronounced for non-Black vs Black students. While males tended to report more institutional discrimination than females, the reverse was true for the Middle Eastern group: Middle Eastern females reported institutional discrimination in more domains and more discrimination getting hired than their male counterparts. There was a significant race/ethnicity × gender interaction effect for environmental microaggressions: White males reported more environmental microaggressions than White females, but gender differences were not found in the overall sample.

Originality/value

This study is the first to the authors’ knowledge to assess the interactive effects of gender and ethnicity on the type of microaggressions experienced in a diverse sample that includes individuals of Middle Eastern descent. The authors highlight the range of discriminatory events that ethnoracially minoritized undergraduates experience, even at a minority-serving institution.

Details

Equality, Diversity and Inclusion: An International Journal, vol. 41 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-7149

Keywords

Abstract

Details

Remembering the Life, Work, and Influence of Stuart A. Karabenick
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80455-710-5

Article
Publication date: 3 June 2014

Agata Debowska, Daniel Boduszek, Philip Hyland and Simon Goodson

– The purpose of this paper is to present and provide a critical review of most recent studies inquiring into brain abnormalities in psychopathy.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to present and provide a critical review of most recent studies inquiring into brain abnormalities in psychopathy.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors provide an overview of the findings of neurobiological studies conducted in the last five years. Publications chosen for review were found using Web of Science, PsycINFO and Scopus search engines.

Findings

Data in the literature reveal that psychopathy is associated with brain abnormalities in frontal and temporo-limbic regions, i.e. regions responsible for moral decision making, emotional processing and learning. Additionally, interactions between the brain areas have been identified as crucial for the development of psychopathic personality traits. Research findings suggest that the flow of impulses between the frontal cortex and temporo-limbic structures in psychopaths is significantly hindered.

Originality/value

The current paper provides an in-depth review of most recent neurobiological studies inquiring into brain abnormalities associated with psychopathic personality traits. Moreover, a particular attention has been paid to identifying abnormalities in brain structures not previously studied in relation to psychopathy (e.g. mirror neuron system, white matter connections).

Details

Mental Health Review Journal, vol. 19 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1361-9322

Keywords

Abstract

Details

The Emerald Review of Industrial and Organizational Psychology
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78743-786-9

Book part
Publication date: 30 October 2023

Sequetta F. Sweet

This chapter proposes a sustainable trajectory for leadership and diversity, equity, and inclusion (DEI) organizational change in higher education. Leadership practices and…

Abstract

This chapter proposes a sustainable trajectory for leadership and diversity, equity, and inclusion (DEI) organizational change in higher education. Leadership practices and strategies necessary to construct and implement change and cultivate diverse, equitable, and inclusive educational environments are deliberated, with particular emphasis on transformational leadership theories and practices. These types of organization development practices produce concrete transformation in institutions that have long-established, inert, and deeply entrenched cultures in which discriminatory or even racist practices have been deeply embedded and accepted over time. The complex dynamics of transformation in higher education, brought on, in part, by the rigidity of its organizational structure coupled with its history and foundation in racism and racist practices, makes achieving sustainable change difficult in higher education. Transformational change requires the creation of new mental models through meaning making and perspective sharing that allow individuals in higher education to think differently about how higher education institutions should operate given the rapid shifts in our society. Organizational change leaders must engage in deep, purposeful, and critical reflection and examination of the organization's culture to lay the groundwork for significant change. The chapter explores topics such as leading change through transformational leadership and the styles, practices, and capabilities associated with it, leadership development, strategic diversity leadership, and the Chief Diversity Officer (CDO) as change leader in higher education. The internal and external environmental trends demanding substantive change in higher education continue to intensify over time. The demand for pervasive transformation in higher education is resounding, and institutional leaders must be open to and even drive new and innovative approaches to shifting its very core – its DNA, its culture – to meet those demands.

Book part
Publication date: 9 November 2004

Paul D. Hutchison and Craig G. White

Productivity, participation, and trend analyses are used in this study to examine academic tax publications by accounting faculty. These analyses utilize a database of academic…

Abstract

Productivity, participation, and trend analyses are used in this study to examine academic tax publications by accounting faculty. These analyses utilize a database of academic tax articles from 1980 through 2000 derived from 13 academic research journals. Results suggest that, on average, 46 tax articles have been published annually during the most recent five-year period, sole or dual authorship is the primary publication strategy by authors of academic tax articles, and assistant professors authored the most tax articles on an annual basis in these journals. The results also find that schools of residence for those publishing are far more diverse than the schools of training. Comparisons with Kozub et al. (1990) show some limited similarities for school at publication and university of degree productivity listings. This study also identifies some of the overall context for tax accounting research by noting groups making a significant contribution to the literature.

Details

Advances in Taxation
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-76231-134-7

Article
Publication date: 28 January 2014

Stella Christiana Stevens, Lynn Hemmings, Claire Scott, Anthony Lawler and Craig White

– The purpose of this paper is to investigate to what extent an engaging or authentic leadership style is related to higher levels of patient safety performance.

3568

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate to what extent an engaging or authentic leadership style is related to higher levels of patient safety performance.

Design/methodology/approach

A survey and/or interview of 53 medical and dental staff on their perceptions of leadership style in their unit was conducted. Scores obtained from 51 responses were averaged for each question and overall performance was compared with unit specific hand hygiene (HH) compliance data. Interview material was transcribed and analysed independently by each member of the research team.

Findings

A modest negative relationship between this leadership style and hand hygiene compliance rates (r=0.37) was found. Interview data revealed that environmental factors, role modelling by the leader and education to counter false beliefs about hand hygiene and infection control may be more important determinants of patient safety performance in this regard than actual overall leadership style.

Research limitations/implications

The sample was relatively small, other attributes of leaders were not investigated.

Practical implications

Leadership development for clinicians may need to focus on situational or adaptive capacity rather than a specific style. In the case of improving patient safety through increasing HH compliance, a more directive approach with clear statements backed up by role modelling appears likely to produce better rates.

Originality/value

Little is known about patient safety and clinical leadership. Much of the current focus is on developing transformational, authentic or engaging style. This study provides some evidence that it should not be used exclusively.

Details

Leadership in Health Services, vol. 27 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1751-1879

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 20 June 2008

S. Tamer Cavusgil, Z. Seyda Deligonul and David A. Griffith

This chapter offers a template for examining the rigor and validity ideals in international business survey research. It provides (1) observations on how research-quality checks…

Abstract

This chapter offers a template for examining the rigor and validity ideals in international business survey research. It provides (1) observations on how research-quality checks are currently used, and (2) recommendations about prerequisites for their use. These recommendations are based on the idea that the ideal of rigor and validity is not absolute and cannot be achieved by ad-hoc checks. We argue that there must be certain linkages and progression in attempting higher quality in survey research. We propose a hierarchy of stipulations to strive for highest validity and rigor goal, which we entitle commensurability. As such, this framework outlines the different steps which need to be examined progressively to approach commensurability.

Details

International Business Scholarship: AIB Fellows on the First 50 Years and Beyond
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-7623-1470-6

Article
Publication date: 1 December 2005

Sarah Lewis, Craig A. White and Liam Dorris

The purpose of this article is to identify the range of psychosocial care components used by a multidisciplinary breast cancer team.

969

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this article is to identify the range of psychosocial care components used by a multidisciplinary breast cancer team.

Design/methodology/approach

A questionnaire was developed to assess the range of psychosocial care components used by the team, their confidence using them and their training needs in relation to them. A total of 15 people completed the questionnaire from seven different professions.

Findings

The breast cancer team carried out a wide range of psychosocial care components despite little formal training to support their work. They valued the importance of psychosocial interventions and recognised their learning needs in relation to them.

Research limitations/implications

The small sample size limited ability to detect correlations and significant trends within the data. Future research could sample other cancer teams and use the questionnaire before and after training to detect changes in the use of psychosocial care components.

Practical implications

The psychosocial needs of cancer patients are best met when all members of the team are aware of and respond to those needs. This study suggests that team members' confidence in using psychosocial care components should be regularly assessed and training provided. It is proposed that a questionnaire is a valuable way of gathering information and evaluating training.

Originality/value

This paper would be of value to a manager or clinician aiming to develop a multidisciplinary approach to the psychosocial care of cancer patients.

Details

Clinical Governance: An International Journal, vol. 10 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7274

Keywords

1 – 10 of over 2000